9 Things You Need to Know About Closing

first_imgThe words you use to ask for your dream client’s business are less important than all of the things you do leading up to that point.There are a lot of smaller “asks” that you need to make on your way to the final “ask.” You can’t move the final “ask” forward by skipping the “asks” that should have come before it.Your dream client wants you to ask for their business. They want to work with someone who wants to do the work.If the language you use to close makes you uncomfortable, then it probably isn’t good closing language. If your close has a name, then it probably isn’t good for business-to-business sales.If your dream client doesn’t say “yes” to your ask, then they have some concern that you haven’t yet resolved. If you don’t resolve that concern (or overcome that objection, if you prefer), then you are not going to get an affirmative answer by asking again.If your dream client has needs now, ask for the opportunity to help, even if you haven’t completed all the steps in your sales process. You can begin working with them while you are going through the process.There is no scenario in which it makes sense for you to wait for your dream client to ask you to work with them. Not asking for the business doesn’t make you a better salesperson.Sometimes the best way to help your dream client is to ask for the commitment to get started and force them to make a decision that they have been postponing because they are afraid to make a change that is necessary.Asking for the commitments you need to serve your dream client doesn’t make you a bad or pushy salesperson. Not asking does.last_img read more

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How to Measure Productivity in Sales

first_imgA lot of people mistake being busy for being productive. Crossing to-dos off a list may, in fact, mean you’re productive, but as it pertains to sales, it may mean that you are incredibly unproductive.There are only two activities that prove that you are productive when it comes to selling. The first measurement of productivity is the opportunities created. The second measurement of your productivity is how many of those opportunities you win (caution here, winning one big deal may mean you are not productive, and winning many small deals may also mean that you are not doing well).The time you spend at work is no indication of productivity. Neither is the number of dials you make per hour or day. The number of face-to-face sales calls or ear-to-ear sales calls or video face to video face sales calls are also no measurement of productivity. They are activity, and not all activity produces the right outcomes. You can have meetings in which nothing is accomplished. They may even be necessary, but that does not mean that any initiative was advanced. The last thing on earth you can measure that might be mistaken for productivity is email, something that is necessary and that almost invariably reduces your productivity.All of the above activities are only proof that you are productive if and when you obtain the primary outcome that those activities are designed to generate. While it’s necessary that you dial the phone and schedule appointments the outcome is a new opportunity being created. And while it’s important to have sales meetings, it is possible to have meetings that do not result in the next step for you or a prospective client. It’s also possible to have meetings in which an opportunity is not advanced from one stage to the next.Productivity is the measurement of the outcomes you create divided by the time and energy you invest in those outcomes. Time and energy invested in activities that do not produce an outcome do not mean that you were productive. This is true even when the non-productive activities are necessary.Think of it this way, if you could generate the outcomes of creating and winning opportunities without doing any of the other activities that are necessary but not sufficient to produc those outcomes, would that be enough for you to reach your goal? If the answer is yes, then you should focus your time and energy on producing those outcomes. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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Goa drowning tragedy: sixth body found

first_imgThe Margao police on Tuesday recovered the lone missing body of the six victims who drowned in the Karwar Chendiya waterfalls on Sunday. Fire service personnel retrieved the body of Renuka Murbutti, which was found floating in a pipeline. The body was found by family members of the deceased. The six victims, including four women, were part of a group of 50 from Goa who were picnicking at the waterfalls. The six drowned following a sudden rise in water level at the falls. All bodies have now been recovered.last_img read more

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4,327 Kashmiris get a reprieve

first_imgThe Jammu and Kashmir government on Wednesday withdrew cases against 4,327 youths, mainly first-time stone-throwers involved in 744 cases of disturbing law and order in the past one year.Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti announced the decision after a high-powered committee, headed by Director-General of Police S.P. Vaid, submitted its report to her in Jammu.Regular monitoringAn official spokesman said cases against these youths stood withdrawn. “The DGP has been asked to regularly monitor the progress in the matter and furnish a fortnightly report,” reads the communication from the Home Department to the DGP. An official spokesman said the decision “marks the revival of the process of withdrawal of cases started by Ms. Mufti immediately after taking over last year”.In the past, the Mufti government set a process of reviewing cases against youths involved in incidents from 2008 to 2014. “The process, unfortunately, got disrupted due to the continued violence and unrest in the latter part of last year,” the spokesman said.A total of 848 cases, involving 4,957 youths, had been withdrawn since last year. “She [the Chief Minister] is committed to withdrawing cases against youths found ‘not involved in heinous crimes’,” said the spokesman.The release of first-time stone-throwers was also recommended by the Government of India’s Special Representative on J&K, Dineshwar Sharma, who completed his first visit in the second week of November. He later made a presentation before the Union Home Ministry in Delhi.“The decision is a ray of hope for these young boys and their families. It is an opportunity for them to rebuild their lives,” Ms. Mufti said. She hoped the decision would help in creating “a positive and conciliatory atmosphere” in the State.last_img read more

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Amarnath attack a quick plan: SIT

first_imgEleven militants used two cars and one motorbike to carry out the attack on a bus carrying Amarnath pilgrims on July 10 last year in Kashmir and “the spot and the target was picked just days before the attack”, says the Special Investigation Team (SIT) that filed a chargesheet against the accused on Monday.Read: Sheikh Salim Gafur, driver who saved Amarnath pilgrims, gets second highest awardSpeaking to The Hindu, SIT head and Superintendent of Police (SP) Tahir Ashraf Bhatti said, “The Lashkar-e-Taiba terrorists, including locals, and its head Abu Ismail, picked the spot and the target just a few days before the attack. It was executed by four terrorists directly, with others being assigned their role to provide logistics and keep an eye on the movement of the yatri bus.”Also Read Charge sheet against LeT, 11 people in Amarnath terror attack case  He said two cars and one bike was used for the attack. “One car remains missing,” the officer added. Eight pilgrims died last year when heavily armed militants opened indiscriminate fire on the bus carrying pilgrims from Baltal to Jammu on the Srinagar-Jammu National Highway.According to the 1,500-page SIT report, the bus got disconnected from its security cover first at Pantha Chowk, where the pilgrims picked up more associates, and “later developed a technical snag”, which was attended to at Awantipora.Of the 11 accused, four persons, including a juvenile, have been arrested.last_img read more

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Soldiers rescue three from mob in Assam

first_imgSoldiers on patrol rescued three persons who were surrounded by locals at Mahur in central Assam’s Dima Hasao district on Thursday on the suspicion that they were child-lifters. The trio had come in an Uttar Pradesh-registered car.Prasanta Saikia, the District’s Superintendent of Police, said the soldiers rescued them before they were assaulted, but the locals had rummaged through their belongings in the car and found an LPG cylinder, some packets, medicines and sprays.“The cooperation of some local people helped avert a serious situation,” Mr. Saikia said.Assam has had several cases of lynching triggered by rumours spread through the social media. The worst of these claimed the lives of two adventurer friends – sound engineer Nilotpal Das and businessman Abhijeet Nath – who were clobbered to death in a Karbi Anglong village on suspicion of being child-lifters.last_img read more

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Hotel rooms booked for J&K civic poll candidates

first_imgThe J&K government on Tuesday offered hotel accommodation as part of security arrangements to candidates contesting the urban local bodies elections in the State from October 8. “Additional 400 companies of armed forces will be deployed for polling duty across Kashmir keeping in view law and order situation. Around 300 hotel rooms have been booked in Srinagar for candidates and similar arrangements are made in south and north Kashmir. Adequate security will be given to candidates,” Chief Secretary B.V.R. Subrahmanyam said.The government has also decided to provide a month’s extra salary to employees opting for election duty.The elections are being held to 79 urban local bodies with 1,200 wards — 600 each in the Kashmir and Jammu regions. There are 4,490 panchayats in the State, headed by sarpanches. Posts of 35,000 panchs will be filled through the elections. Funds for civic bodiesMr. Subrahmanyam said ₹4,335 crore will be devolved to the ULBs for development activities. “There is no link between the timing of panchayat elections and the hearing of the PIL petition challenging Article 35-A before the court. It is just accidental that the case is listed in January and the panchayat elections are to be completed before that,” Mr. Subrahmanyam said.The All J&K Panchayat Conference chief Shafiq Mir expressed unhappiness over the measures taken by the govt. “Both urban local bodies and panchayats are community institutions and have no link with the larger political issue of J&K. It should not be politicised. The security to candidates should come from the community. Instead of hotel rooms, the government should work on providing conducive atmosphere for elections,” he said.Meanwhile, the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) suspended the party leader, Hameed Manhas, for filing his nomination for the election. “Manhas tried to defy the unanimous decision to stay away from the polls,” said party spokesman Rafiq Mir.last_img read more

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J&K Governor raises issue of manhandling of Kashmiri students with Adityanath

first_imgJ&K Governor Satya Pal Malik on Friday raised the issue of manhandling of Kashmiri students at a varsity with UP Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath.“Governor sought the intervention of the UP Chief Minister to ensure that the Kashmiri students are provided a safe and secure environment in the educational institutions of the State,” said a Raj Bhawan spokesman.A Kashmiri student was injured at Sharda University Campus in Greater Noida area in an attack by a mob two days ago.“Mr. Adityanath informed the Governor that strict disciplinary action would be taken in the Sharda University incident,” said the spokesman. The UP government has already ordered an inquiry into the incident. “All measures would be taken to ensure safety of Kashmiri students so that they can continue their studies in a safe environment,” the spokesman added.last_img read more

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Think globally, Sitharaman tells defence shipyards

first_imgDefence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman on Thursday urged Defence Ministry shipyards not to constantly seek equipment manufacturing contracts from the ministry, and to explore global markets as well.She was speaking at the launch of an offshore patrol vessel (OPV) of the Indian Coast Guard manufactured by Goa Shipyard Limited (GSL), a public sector undertaking, at Mormugao port. “Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Make in India’ call is not just aimed at manufacturing for local markets, but also to promote India as a defence equipment manufacturing hub for a global market,” she said. “There should definitely be an approach of competing globally. You have a market everywhere where the Defence Minister of India or the Commerce Minister of India goes out.” The Defence Minister said there is immense interest in buying equipment such as offshore patrol vessels and speedboats to guard borders from India. She announced that the OPV launched on Thursday would be named Sachet. Cmde. B.B. Nagpal, chairman and managing director, GSL, and Rajendra Singh, Director General of the Indian Coast Guard, were among those present. Sachet is the first of five OPVs being built by GSL for the Coast Guard. The 105-metre-long OPV, with a displacement of 2,350 tonnes at full load and endurance of 600 nautical miles, is expected to patrol and police the Indian Exclusive Economic Zone.last_img read more

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The Physics of Sandstorms

first_imgMidair collisions of sand particles can double the strength of a sandstorm, according to new computer simulations. The work—among the first analyses to track every sand grain in a virtual storm—could help predict how this destructive weather phenomenon shapes the surrounding landscape.It’s not easy to recreate a sandstorm on a computer. These columns of windswept sand—which can cause roadway pileups, eat away at buildings and machinery, and drive larger processes such as  erosion and dune formation—consisting of many millions of interacting particles propelled by ever-changing winds. Their intricacies overwhelm even the most powerful processors, forcing scientists to simplify their models, says physicist Marcus Vinicius Carneiro of ETH Zürich in Switzerland, lead author on the new research.But as computer speeds have increased, researchers have been able to make their simulations more complex. Recent models reveal a hierarchy within the seemingly chaotic cloud of sand. Just a few centimeters off the ground in a layer called the soft bed, bouncing particles called reptons move in the direction of the wind. A small number of grains called saltons leap high above the bed in a process known as saltation. These grains move much faster and have longer trajectories than reptons, because wind speeds increase with altitude. But physicists have struggled to explain what separates low-bouncing reptons from high-flying saltons, Carneiro says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)He and his colleagues have been developing a program, first described in a 2011 paper, that follows the trajectory of every grain of sand in a model storm under various wind conditions. They can now simulate the movement of 4000 particles, which, Carneiro points out, is less than a mouthful of sand, but still a leap forward in complexity.In this new research, the team focuses on one feature that previous models have had to ignore: collisions between individual grains in the air. “Mathematical models become simply easier if midair collisions are neglected,” says Eric Parteli, a physicist at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in Germany who was not involved in the research. The influence of these interactions on the speed and strength of a sandstorm was initially assumed to be negligible, he says.The team ran simulations to gauge the effect of midair collisions on a storm’s strength, which they measure as flux, the number of particles passing through a given volume of air in a given amount of time. They can switch these collisions on and off in their model to see how flux changes. The team expected that particles bumping into one another would dissipate energy and slow the storm down, Carneiro says, but the results surprised them. Including midair collisions in the model increased the flux, in extreme cases approximately doubling the strength of the storm, they report online this month in Physical Review Letters.“In the beginning, we thought that was a mistake,” Carneiro says. But as the researchers further explored their simulation, they developed an explanation. As a sandstorm gets started, a strong wind lifts some particles off the ground. When they crash back into the soft bed of slow-moving particles, they create a splash, kicking more particles into the air. (This splash effect had been suggested in previous research.) The team dubbed these kicked-up grains leapers. When a grain on its way back down collides with an ascending leaper, the descending grain gets buoyed higher into the air. This is how reptons become high-flying saltons, the team explains. And the splash of descending saltons makes more and more leapers, which buoy more saltons in turn. As sand grains reach altitudes with greater wind speed, the sandstorm escalates.This more detailed and accurate model could help scientists better predict the motion of dunes or manage coastal land threatened by erosion, says physicist Hans Jürgen Herrmann, also of ETH Zürich, who led the research team. He thinks previous models that did not take midair collision into account have been underestimating the strength of sandstorms, making their prediction of a storm’s effects on the landscape inaccurate.This underestimation is most dramatic at higher wind speeds, notes Jasper Kok, an atmospheric physicist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who was not involved in the work. That means models ignoring the collisions would still be largely accurate for all but the most extreme storms. He also notes that numerical models like the team used have their limits. “Even though it’s a really well-done paper and I think the physics all checks out, it needs to be confirmed by experiment.” Such experiments will be a challenge, Kok says, because it’s hard to prevent these midair collisions when recreating a sandstorm in a wind tunnel or when measuring speeds of windblown sand in the field. What’s more, he says, the finding increases the gap between models and real-world studies. “Usually we get higher fluxes than what they measure in the field. And this finding makes it even worse.” If the collisions are as crucial as this research suggests, physicists will have to find some other way to account for the widening gap between the true storms and their digital mimics.last_img read more

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Podcast: Saturn’s Giant Moon, Jumping Frogs, and Why Exercise Is Good for Our Brains

first_imgHow did Saturn’s giant moon Titan get so big? How did a Mark Twain story inspire a scientific study? And why does exercise benefit our brains? Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science’s Sarah Crespi.Listen to the full Science podcast.Read the transcript.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Hear more podcasts.last_img read more

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Will ‘lazy’ fish benefit most from new U.S. marine megareserve?

first_imgPresident Barack Obama has moved forward with a plan to vastly expand three remote U.S. reserves in the central Pacific Ocean into a massive national monument.In June, White House officials announced that they were considering expanding the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument (PRIMNM), which covers about 225,000 square kilometers. On Wednesday evening, the White House announced that Obama will sign a proclamation expanding the monument to about 1.27 million square kilometers. Obama is acting under authority granted by the Antiquities Act, which allows a president to create a national monument with the stroke of a pen, and without action by Congress.The total is somewhat smaller than a proposal to protect some 1.8 million square kilometers that the White House floated in June. Obama will extend fishing bans and other monument protections to include the entire U.S. exclusive economic zone around the islands of Jarvis, Johnson, and Wake (the zone extends to up to 200 nautical miles offshore). But the White House did not advance plans to greatly expand protections around the islands of Palmyra, Howland, and Baker, which are targeted by tuna fishing boats. Making that move would have allowed the new U.S. monument to bump up against another megareserve, the Phoenix Islands Protected Area, and create the world’s largest swath of ocean closed to fishing. Fishing groups had opposed closing the tuna fishing areas, saying it would have created economic hardship.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Still, conservation groups are applauding the move. “This marks an important day for ocean conservation in this country,” said Matt Rand, the leader of the Pew Charitable Trust’s Global Ocean Legacy project, which has advocated for the expansion, in a statement. “We hope the steps taken today by the U.S. government will accelerate similar actions by a growing list of coastal nations to protect more of the world’s great ocean treasures.”Marine researchers predict the move will benefit a vast array of marine creatures by helping protect relatively remote and intact ecosystems. But they note any benefits could be decades away for some of the region’s most heavily exploited fish, including certain species of tuna. And how fast those populations recover could depend partly on just how “lazy” some of the fish are.In general, relatively little fishing occurs in the remote waters covered by the new reserve. Few fishing boats ply the waters around the atolls of Wake and Johnston, east of Hawaii, where fish abundance is naturally low. A fleet does target the more tuna-rich waters around the islands of Howland, Baker, Palmyra, Kingman Reef, and Jarvis. But those areas produce less than 4% of their total catch (mostly bigeye and skipjack tuna), according to figures from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).Tuna species that don’t stray far from the reserve during their lives could see quick benefits. For example, recent studies suggest that more than 90% of yellowfin tuna found around the main Hawaiian Islands remain in the region. (Yellowfin populations are estimated to be at 38% of historic levels.)The reserve’s immediate impact could be more muted, however, for fish species that routinely travel vast distances, and so spend relatively little time in the new preserve, biologists say. In particular, recent tagging studies suggest that bigeye tuna—prized for sushi and down to just 16% of historic populations—“do not exhibit any prolonged residency in this or any other area of the equatorial central Pacific,” wrote John Hampton, director of the Oceanic Fisheries Programme at the Secretariat of the Pacific Community in Nouméa, in an e-mail. (The group advises Pacific states on how to fish sustainably.)Even within mobile species, however, the reserve could help, researchers say. That’s because fish are like people: Some like to travel, and others are homebodies. For bigeye tuna, the proportion of lazy fish is unknown, but “the point is that some will [stay within the reserve, and] they will produce more offspring during a longer life than those who don’t,” says fisheries scientist Daniel Pauly of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. The lazy fish may also “pass on their short-travel habits to their offspring, who will grow in numbers.”Indeed, over many years, modeling studies suggest the reserve could even encourage the evolution of “lazier” but healthier fish populations, says fish geneticist Jon Mee, a former colleague of Pauly’s who is now a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Calgary in Canada. “We have lots of evidence that mobility has a genetic basis and is inherited to a fairly high degree,” he says. And if fish “that move more, die more, you will get evolution.” In simulations that Mee is developing, lazy individuals living in protected areas can have higher reproduction rates than their more mobile—and more vulnerable—relatives, leading to larger but less mobile populations.Another long-term benefit provided by the new reserve could be to make fish populations less vulnerable to climate change, says Patrick Lehodey, an oceanographer at the French satellite company CLS in Toulouse, France. In a recent study published in Climatic Change, he and colleagues found that by 2060, waters in the Central Pacific, where the reserves are located, will become warm enough to attract more skipjack tuna from the Western Pacific, where populations are now usually denser and fishing is more intense.Such results suggest there are few downsides to expanding marine reserves, says Jane Lubchenco, a marine ecologist at Oregon State University and NOAA administrator from 2009 to 2013.  “It makes sense to protect an area before it’s seriously degraded,” she says.See here for more on conservation science.*Update, 25 September, 7:30 a.m.: This story has been updated to clarify how the final White House plan differs from the proposal presented in June.*Update, 25 September, 11:46 a.m.: The lead has been corrected; the new additions will fall short of doubling the total area of the world’s marine reserves. The details of the expansion have been clarified. Jane Lubchenco’s quote has also been updated.last_img read more

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U.S. takes possible first step toward regulating nanochemicals

first_imgThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is ratcheting up its scrutiny of nanoscale chemicals amid concerns that they could pose unique environmental and health risks. Late last month, the agency proposed requiring companies to submit data on industrial nanomaterials that they already make and sell. Observers say EPA’s move could be a prelude to tighter federal regulation of nanomaterials, which have begun to show up in consumer products.For years, EPA has grappled with whether and how to use the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the nation’s leading chemical regulation law, to handle nanomaterials. TSCA is silent on nanoproducts, generally defined as materials composed of structures between 1 and 100 billionths of a meter. But many environmental groups worry that they potentially carry unknown risks by virtue of their size. Other observers, however, have argued that size alone shouldn’t trigger new regulation and that existing rules are adequate to deal with the new products.EPA’s 25 March proposal actually walks back an earlier version—now scrapped—that would have let the agency more easily clamp down on any new uses of nanomaterials. Still, the weaker version being proposed now represents the first time EPA would use its powers under TSCA to request information specifically on nanomaterials. (The proposal comes as Congress is debating revamping TSCA, which has drawn extensive criticism.)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Under the rule, manufacturers would have to submit a range of data regarding the nanoscale substances they now make and that fall under TSCA’s scope—such as substances used in industrial applications. EPA wants to know how much the company is producing, for example, as well as potential public exposures, and manufacturing and processing methods. It also wants see any existing health and safety data. In addition, the agency would require manufacturers of proposed new nanomaterials to submit existing data before they want to start making and selling those substances.The rule wouldn’t force companies to generate any new health and safety data. And by itself, the rule wouldn’t restrict any nanomaterials’ use, EPA notes in its draft proposal. The agency’s actions “do not conclude and are not intended to conclude that nanoscale materials as a class, or specific uses of nanoscale materials, necessarily give rise to or are likely to cause harm,” the notice states. Rather, EPA says the information would let it better assess nanomaterials’ risks.And the agency states that its approach would help protect human health and the environment “without prejudging new technologies or creating unnecessary barriers to trade or hampering innovation.” EPA argues that case-by-case approach would jibe with a set of nanotech regulation principles released in 2011 by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Those principles advise agencies against making one-size-fits-all judgments.The American Chemistry Council (ACC), the largest chemical industry trade group, is still evaluating the proposal, it said in a statement. But it “is particularly interested in how EPA defines the materials to be covered by the proposed rule,” says Jay West, manager of ACC’s Nanotechnology Panel, says in the statement.The proposal is “logical” and “creatively written,” says Lynn Bergeson, a managing partner with the law firm Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. in Washington, D.C., which advises companies on EPA regulatory compliance. Some companies may argue the rule is too broad or burdensome, she says, or worry that EPA’s move could stigmatize their products. But the government effort to collect information could potentially help the industry by reassuring a skeptical public, she adds. “If there are no data on which EPA is able to rely to conclude that there is no risk, then the agency really is not doing its job,” she says.The proposal is a good first step for EPA, says Jaydee Hanson, policy director at the International Center for Technology Assessment, a group in Washington, D.C., that has raised concerns about nanotechnology’s potential risks. But he worries that many companies might simply not respond and that the cash-strapped EPA would struggle to crack down on violators. And he worries that the proposal would let companies keep too much information secret, by claiming it as confidential business information. (TSCA reforms that Congress is debating would limit the types of information that companies could claim as confidential, he notes.) But Hanson is looking on the bright side. “We wish [EPA was] doing more, but we’re excited that they are doing it,” he says.Still, even with all the new information in hand, it’s unclear how much action EPA could take to restrict nanomaterials under current law. In general, EPA has moved slowly to regulate new chemicals, and struggled to meet the burden that TSCA sets on it for removing, restricting, or preventing the sale of chemicals found to be unsafe. Congress says it wants to make that process easier, but it is unclear how any new rules would apply to nanotechnologies.last_img read more

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Startups Hiring Foreign Professionals Due to Dearth of Artificial Intelligence Talent in India

first_imgWhy are Indian startups looking for talent abroad? Well, the answer to this is the dearth of homegrown professionals on the ground with knowledge of UI/UX (user interface/user experience), artificial intelligence, machine learning, reports The Economic Times.Industry experts are of the opinion that roles in data science and data engineering are not typically part of the curriculum of Indian colleges.Read it at Money Control Related Itemslast_img

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Turn of the Turds

first_imgThis month Little India undertook an exercise journalists usually loathe — seek to referee a festering public dispute. Our report, “Parsing the Sacred,” determined that Paul Courtright’s 1985 book, titled Ganesa: Lord of Obstacles, Lord of Beginnings, which has been fiercely criticized for several years now, has inaccurate references on the Puranas. We are astonished that the religious studies community resisted addressing these factual disputes for so long. The arrogance and disdain with which some scholars have treated their non-academic critics is nothing short of astounding.Wendy Doniger, a leading Hinduism scholar at the University of Chicago, for instance, ridiculed one of her critics for hanging around academic conferences “where real scholars gather as jackals hang about the congregations of lions.” Instead of engaging the critiques of her scholarship, she taunted him as an “aufgestllte Mausdrek, a mouse turd standing up on end. You do not even know enough to know how much you do not know.”Turns out the mouse turds knew a thing or two the academic Brahmans didn’t. Ganesa must be chortling.Even worse, some critics were publicly bullied. An author of Invading the Sacred, a book critical of several religious scholars, for example, was threatened with exposure to his employer for using the company’s email server for posting his critiques.Such street epithets and intimidation tactics by scholars, of religion, no less, to silence their pesky critics is appalling and downright bizarre.That said, Hindus must also respect the traditions of intellectual freedom and inquiry in an academic setting. We reject the proposition that scholars should be sensitive in their treatment of religious subjects. Scriptures in the Hindu tradition are living, breathing documents, open to reinterpretation and reinvention by Hindus and non Hindus alike.The Puranas are uncharacteristically honest in exploring the deepest taboos and Hindus need not be touchy about perceived slights, offensive treatments and departures from narrow literal interpretations. Few Hindus have any familiarity with the Puranas, precisely because they have become fossilized by mechanical textual readings.Notwithstanding the identified weaknesses in the scholarship, Courtright’s book on Ganesa is a valuable contribution to the literature on one of Hindu’s most important deities. Likewise, Doniger’s sometimes playful, sometimes acerbic, often lurid discourses on Hindu scriptures have engaged a generation of scholars and opened new vistas in Hinduism studies. Attempts to suppress such scholarship or intimidate these scholars, as occurred with Courtright, whose book on Ganesa was withdrawn under pressure from Hindu radicals by its Indian publisher, must be denounced and resisted.The public discourse cannot be surrendered to loonies and extremists, who have a chilling effect upon scholars. But surely the one arena where it should be possible to conduct a nuanced, even if occasionally caustic, debate on passionately held views is the academy.Courtright in his response last month in Little India rightly noted that a university is not an ashram. But nor ought it to be a fortress to hold back dissenters. A commitment to intellectual freedom demands that the academic community step up to its professional responsibilities by engaging and embracing dissent, just as it makes it incumbent upon their critics to unequivocally deplore and counter threats against scholars with whom they disagree. Related Itemslast_img read more

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U.P. govt. issues orders to withdraw 22 more cases of Muzaffarnagar riots

first_imgThe Uttar Pradesh government has issued orders to withdraw 22 more cases linked to the 2013 Muzaffarnagar riots, taking the total number to 70. Additional district magistrate Amit Kumar confirmed to The Hindu that he has received the orders. “Out of 90 cases in which report was sought, the government has decided to withdraw proceedings in 70 cases. These are cases related to arson and loot,” he said.District government counsel Dushyant Tyagi said he would move the application at relevant courts. “I can’t say much as the cases are still sub-judice. It is for the court to accept or reject the government’s position.” The riots which swept Muzaffarnagar in 2013 claimed at least 65 lives and thousands were displaced. Since 2017, Muzaffarnagar courts have delivered verdicts in 41 cases and have acquitted the accused in 40 cases where Muslims were attacked.Mr. Tyagi said the government was not keen to go on appeal in acquitted cases. The prime reason, he said, was witnesses in most cases turned hostile. Welcoming the move, senior BJP leader from Muzaffarnagar Sohanveer Singh said these were “fake cases” foisted by the then Samajwadi Party government. Describing the move as “unprecedented”, human rights activist Ovais Sultan Khan, who has been working with the victims since 2013, said it was the third attempt by the Yogi Adityanath government since last year to derail the criminal-judicial procedure in the case. “It is a way to tell the victims that the government of the day is not with them and that others should withdraw cases as well. Those who instigated or participated in the riots are sitting on positions of power,” he alleged. He refuted the administration’s claim that witnesses are being protected. “Many have wilted under social pressure and threats and the ones who have not are being killed like Ashbab.” added Mr. Khan. A milk vendor, Ashbab was a witness to the killing of his two brothers during the riots. He was gunned down at the busy Indra Murti stretch in Muzaffarnagar in March this year just days before a hearing of the case.last_img read more

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Amit Shah chairs 24th meeting of Western Zonal Council in Goa

first_imgUnion Home Minister Amit Shah on Thursday chaired the 24th meeting of Western Zonal Council in Goa. The Western Zonal Council is a forum for the Centre and States to exchange ideas on issues such as health, security and social welfare. Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis, Gujarat Chief Minister Vijay Rupani, Goa Chief Minister Pramod Sawant, representatives from the Union Territories of Daman and Diu and Dadra and Nagar Haveli attended the meeting. Mr. Sawant is the vice-chairman and host of the meeting. The previous meeting of the Western Zonal Council was chaired by then Home Minister Rajnath Singh at Gandhinagar in Gujarat in April last year. The zonal councils provide a forum where irritants between the Centre and the States, and among the States themselves can be resolved through free and frank discussions and consultations, an official said. The States have been divided into five zones and each zone has its council comprising the Chief Minister, two Ministers and the Chief Secretary of each State. The zonal councils are headed by the Union Home Minister and each zone nominates one Chief Minister as its vice-chairman on rotation basis.last_img read more

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