PASADENA STAKES QUOTES-SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 2020

first_imgJOCKEY QUOTESUMBERTO RISPOLI, HARIBOUX, WINNER: “I watched film of this horse before I rode him the last time (a second place finish in the Eddie Logan Stakes Dec. 29).  You could see that if you put him in the race early, he will pull quite a bit.  We decided he needs to be taken off the pace and it’s best for him. Today, I was one hundred percent sure there was enough speed in the race, so Jeff said, ‘Okay, take him back.’  We were able to save ground and coming around the last turn, a gap was open, so why go around?”   TRAINER QUOTESJEFF MULLINS, HARIBOUX, WINNER: “Umberto’s done a great job with him.  He’s a very studious guy and he’s a strong finisher. He’s been able to take him back, drop the reins and gets him to relax very well.  He showed a nice turn of foot today and he’s looking like he’s going to be a really nice horse.“(Hariboux) is just an honest hard trying little horse and he gives it to you every time.”MARK COHEN, RED BARON’S BARN, HARIBOUX, WINNER: “It looked like we were three to five around the far turn and luckily he got the job done.”NOTES: The winning owners are Red Baron’s Barn LLC or Rancho Temescal LLC.last_img read more

Read More →

‘It’s supposed to make Liverpool fans happy’ – FSG smokescreen?

first_img1 It was a quiet transfer window for Liverpool.The Reds recalled teenager Jordon Ibe from his loan spell at Derby and sent 17-year-old Sheyi Ojo to Wigan until the end of the season.However, they did tie playmaker Philippe Coutinho to the club until 2020. The 22-year-old’s previous deal expired in 2018, but he has been offered improved terms to sign on the dotted line.Liverpool paid Inter £8.5m for the Brazilian two years ago and he has become a favourite of the Anfield faithful. Naturally there were some ecstatic supporters when stories of his extension began circulating, but some were critical of the club, believing they were using it to distract from a lack of activity in the market. Philippe Coutinho has signed a new contract at Liverpool last_img read more

Read More →

Alarming Arsenal view: ‘The whole football club must be dismantled’

first_imgArsenal chiefs should not just axe Arsene Wenger, they should dismantle the entire club.That is the view of ex-England striker Rodney Marsh after he witnessed the Gunners fall apart against Monaco in the Champions League on Wednesday night.The finger of blame is being pointed at Wenger, who, having led the club to just one trophy in the last nine years, is running out of support at the Emirates.But Marsh insists Arsenal’s problems run deeper than the manager and is warning they must carry out a complete overhaul if they are to enjoy a repeat of the major success they had in the early part of the Frenchman’s reign.Speaking on the Sports Bar, the expert pundit said: “Arsenal football club, ten years ago they were sensational. They had brilliant players and a brilliant, brilliant team.“They want to go back there and to do that you don’t just sack Arsene Wenger, you sack the lot. You go and dismantle the whole football club.“There are players playing that are not Arsenal players. There are players playing that don’t seem to care about the club. [Mesut] Ozil, they paid £42milion for him, he is not interested.“It’s bitch and bitch and bitch and moan. If you are going to change that, you can’t just sack Arsene Wenger at the end of the season, because the next guy that comes in, what is he going to do?”last_img read more

Read More →

DDTV: KATIE HERRON – ‘WINNING ULSTER TITLE HAS GIVEN US THE BELIEF TO GO FURTHER’

first_imgDDTV: Katie Herron has said that winning the Ulster title has given Donegal the belief to go further in the All-Ireland series.Herron was speaking to Charlie Collins for Donegal TV in the lead-up to Sunday’s All-Ireland quarter-final against Armagh. She feels the belief the squad have taken from winning their first ever Ulster title can help propel them on and says they are in bonus territory at the minute.She has also urged GAA supporters to come out and cheer them on in Clones this weekend and says the state of the Ladies game in Donegal has never been as healthy.To watch her interview with Donegal TV simply click play on the link above.DDTV: KATIE HERRON – ‘WINNING ULSTER TITLE HAS GIVEN US THE BELIEF TO GO FURTHER’ was last modified: August 17th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DDTVnewsSportlast_img read more

Read More →

Antonio Conte sacked as manager of Chelsea, with Maurizio Sarri set to come in

first_img How Chelsea could line up against Southampton – what system will Lampard play? Chelsea have sacked manager Antonio Conte.The Italian was informed of his departure on Thursday, with former Napoli boss Maurizio Sarri set to replace him. ANTONIO CONTEDoB: 31/07/69Born: Lecce, ItalyTHE PLAYERLecce (1985-1991) Juventus (1991-2004) – Serie A (x5), Coppa Italia, Champions League, UEFA CupItaly (1994-2000) – 20 capsTHE MANAGERArezzo (2006-07)Bari (2007-09) – Serie B Atalanta (2009-10)Siena (2010-11)Juventus (2011-14) – Serie A (x3), Supercoppa Italiana (x2)Italy (2014-16)Chelsea (2016-18) – Premier League, FA Cup Tottenham v Brighton LIVE: talkSPORT commentary and team news for Boxing Day opener Conte returned to Chelsea’s training ground on Monday for the start of pre-season and has been putting the squad through their paces all this week.But he was summoned to a meeting on Thursday and told his services are no longer required.Former Napoli boss Sarri is expected to be appointed as his successor.Sarri led Napoli to a record points total last season as they finished a narrow second in Serie A behind champions Juventus.But he was replaced as manager of the Italian club by Carlo Ancelotti in May. Despite being axed by Napoli, Sarri remained under contract with the club and they have been seeking a compensation figure from Chelsea to allow him to join the Blues.Their president Aurelio de Laurentiis revealed on Wednesday that an agreement was close.“We are in the finishing line,” said De Laurentiis. “Now it depends on [Sarri] and Chelsea.“The Sarri affair is nearly at its conclusion, it all depends on him. My lawyers have submitted papers to his lawyers.”The agreement with Chelsea now looks to have been finalised, with Conte’s exit paving the way for Sarri to take over at Stamford Bridge. smart causal 3 Antonio Conte won two major trophies in his time at Stamford Bridge Tottenham predicted XI to face Brighton with Mourinho expected to make big changes Maurizio Sarri left Napoli after three years in May 3 Conte was appointed as Chelsea manager in the summer of 2016, leaving his role as Italy head coach to take the job at Stamford Bridge.He enjoyed a hugely successful first season in English football, leading the London club to the Premier League title. How the Premier League table could change after the Boxing Day fixtures How Man United could line up for Newcastle clash – will Pogba start? possible standings 3 How Arsenal could line up in Arteta’s first official game in charge – Ozil return? Latest Premier League News CONTE FACTFILE NEW ERA Every current Premier League club’s best kit from the past decade ALTERED who plays? gameday How Liverpool could line up at Leicester with midfielder set for lengthy absence predicted possible xi Antonio Conte has left Chelsea after two years in charge However, the Blues mounted a miserable defence of their title last season, finishing fifth.They did end the 2017/18 campaign on a high by winning the FA Cup but there was intense speculation over Conte’s future throughout the campaign.The 48-year-old is understood to have angered the Chelsea hierarchy with critical comments about the club’s recruitment policy. Gianfranco Zola is being linked with a return to Chelsea as part of the backroom staff.Sarri is also set to be followed from Napoli by midfielder Jorginho.The Italy international was wanted by Manchester City but De Laurentiis claimed on Wednesday the 26-year-old would prefer to live in London and would be moving to Chelsea in a deal worth in excess of £50million.last_img read more

Read More →

SEAN BRINGING SOCCER FUN ACADEMY TO DONEGAL

first_imgLocal soccer coach Sean Davis with Everton and Rep. of Ireland international Shane Duffy at the launch of his Fun Soccer Academy Summer Programme.The coaching will cater for boys and girls aged 5-17 years and will focus primarily on the key areas of dribbling, shooting passing and control through the use of fun coaching techniques.There are also numerous ‘Mini Soccer Competitions’ which include; World Cup; Premier League; Spanish League and Champions League as well as the ever popular ‘Penalty King’ and ‘Penalty Queen’ Competitions. Sean will be bringing the Academy to Bonagee Showgrounds, Letterkenny from Monday 22nd to Thursday 25th July – Contact Gerry Gallagher 0863397235. Ray Community Centre, Rathmullan from Tuesday 23rd to Friday 26th July – Contact Gerry Gallagher 0863397235. Drumbar Utd., Donegal Town from Tuesday 30th July to Friday 2nd August – contact Paddy Brogan 0876834507. Aileach FC, Inch Road, Burnfoot from Tuesday 20th August to Friday 23rd August – contact Stephen O’Donnell 0863009314Registration for the courses will take place on the first day @ 10.00am. Lunch is from 12.30 – 1.00pm with the course finishing a 3.00pm each day. In addition to the coaching each participant will receive: free top quality football, certificate of achievement and refreshments daily and there are 100’s of prizes to be won including t-shirts, trophies, boot-bags and medals.For further information contact Sean Davis on 048 7126 3044:  SEAN BRINGING SOCCER FUN ACADEMY TO DONEGAL was last modified: July 4th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalletterkennysoccer campslast_img read more

Read More →

How Are Radioactive Dates Determined?

first_img A paper in Science last week1 by an international team of earth scientists discussed evidence for extinct plutonium-244 in Australian rocks dated at 4.2 billion years old.  Plutonium-244 has a half-life of 82 million years.  The authors, Turner et al., begin by assuming Pu-244 was well mixed within the cloud that presumably formed the solar system.  Since the Australian rocks are assumed to be among the oldest on earth, they wanted to determine the ratio of plutonium to uranium (Pu/U) for clues to the early evolution of the earth.  Xenon-136 would have been produced primarily by the more rapidly-decaying plutonium-244 in the early years of the earth, then the slower-decaying uranium-238 would gradually have predominated; but the ratio is so low, .004 to .008, that U tends to overwhelm the contribution from Pu unless the rocks are older than 3.8 billion years, the authors claim.     They extracted eight tiny zircon crystals just 50-200 millionths of a meter in size, from rocks they claim are up to 4.1 to 4.2 billion years old.  Detecting the xenon in such a small grain – a quadrillionth of a cubic centimeter – is beyond the range of most instruments, “comparable to blank levels and sensitivities of conventional noble gas mass spectrometers” (i.e., the instrument would show no xenon at all).  They developed what they claim is a more sensitive instrument able to get two orders of magnitude below that low detection threshold, and found a few thousand atoms of xenon.  They measured the xenon isotope ratios from the eight zircons, and graphed their results.  Only two of them fell on the expected Pu/U ratio line expected from the age of the rocks, compared with ratios measured in meteorites which presumably predate the formation of the earth.     The other six were “discordant,” off expectations by 24% to 97%.  Their explanation for these is: “This could be the result of preferential loss of the earlier-formed Pu xenon or the result of chemical fractionation of Pu and U during or before the formation of the zircons.”  How can this be, since they say “Xe is at least as strongly retained as Pb” [lead, the ending fission byproduct]?  Well, lead has also been found to leach out of zircons, and these crystals have been through a long, wild ride: “Nevertheless, Pb loss associated with metamictization is commonly observed in zircons, and, given the antiquity and complex history of the ancient detrital zircons, it is likely that loss of Xe will also have occurred in a portion of our samples.”.  This history could have included “diffusion or recrystallization events” and other metamorphic processes.  Most of the loss would have been early on, when plutonium production of xenon dominated, according to their model, so that explains why the ratio fell short of expectations.  “To be more definitive requires an additional relationship between the time of Xe loss and the degree of loss,” they suggest.  So their study can only claim partial success, and will require more work: “The highest implied Pu/U ratio is within the range of estimates from meteorites, but, in order to quantify a global Pu/U ratio for the early Earth, future work will require an improved understanding of the geochemical behavior of Pu relative to U and the rare earth elements in zircon crystallization.” A paper in the October issue of Geology1 dated the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary to four significant figures, 360.7 million years, with uranium-lead dating, from zircons in Germany.  A closer look at the German team’s methods of selection and treatment of samples, however, indicates a number of assumptions were made.  First, the target date of the period was established by biostratigraphy, or use of index fossils (see 05/21/2004 headline).  Second, since fossils don’t typically contain uranium, the radiometric dates have to be taken from non-fossiliferous material, like volcanic ash that might be in and around the fossils (as in this case) or removed from them (in many other cases).  Third, the zircons were subjected to air blasts, then heating and soaking in acid solutions for days.  Fourth, anomalous dates were thrown out and only 5 of 13 were kept.  The ones thrown out yielded impossibly old dates, which the team shrugged off as a bit of surprise: On the basis of 13 analyses (single zircons or zircon fragments), a younger zircon generation of 5 analyses is distinguished from older zircon generations (Table 1).  The latter, obviously inherited [i.e., formed in earlier periods], yielded 207Pb/206Pb ages of 444 to 2044 Ma (Table 1).  The abundance of Precambrian ages is a remarkable feature; note that no inherited zircons were detected in the study of Claou�-Long et al. (1992).  The error ellipses of the older zircons are clearly separated from a tight concordant cluster of the five youngest zircon analyses, which yield a 206Pb/238U concordia age of 360.5 � 0.8 Ma (Fig. 2A).  This age is interpreted as the crystallization age of the comagmatic zircon population and thus the time of eruption of the ash.  Comagmatic zircons are only a small fraction of the total zircon population.  It is possible that the youngest zircon generation occurs as micrometer-sized rims around inherited zircons as well, but these new growth zones were removed by the air-abrasion procedure prior to the dissolution of the grains. It might be surprising to outsiders to see the amount of pretreatment of samples that goes on as standard procedure in radiometric dating: Zircons selected for analyses were subjected to air abrasion (Krogh, 1982), and most samples were additionally cleaned for 2 h in concentrated HF-HNO3 (4:1) at 80°C to remove attached impurities.  After washing in 7N HNO3 at 80 �C for 25 min, individual grains were placed in multisample Teflon microcapsules and dissolved for at least 4 days in concentrated HF-HNO3 (4:1) at 180°C [285°F].  Subsequently, dissolved zircons were spiked with a mixed 233U-205Pb tracer solution, dried at 80°C, redissolved in 6N HCl [hydrochloric acid], and equilibrated at 180°C for 1 day.  After drying at 80°C, the samples were loaded on a single Re filament using a mixture of silica gel and 6N HCl-0.25N H3PO4. That was just for starters.  The team also “corrected” their measurements; for instance, “For each charge of samples, the maximum Pb blank was assumed to be equivalent to the total amount of nonradiogenic Pb in the analysis of the most radiogenic sample.”  Also, the measurements were done on extremely tiny grains, millionths of an inch in size, with lead masses on the order of tenths of picograms (billionths of a gram): “It was thus necessary to reduce the Pb blank as much as possible… by extremely careful sample handling.”  When measurements were still too low, assumptions were made: “The U blank was too small to be measured and was thus assumed to amount to 20% of the individual Pb blank, based on experience with the analysis of milligram-sized samples” (i.e., they assumed that their samples followed curves established for samples ten million times larger).     The date concluded for the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary, 360.7 million years, was not calculated directly.  It was interpolated from the ages that remained after the air blasts, acid, heat, and interpretation of selected samples. To most of us, the practice of radioactive dating seems like a highly-technical, incomprehensible skill that nevertheless (we are told) yields absolute ages of things.  We don’t know exactly how they arrive at the results, but are led to trust them because very smart people get their answers using hard science with extremely accurate equipment.  It might be helpful to look over their shoulders and see how it’s done.  A couple of recent papers dealt with uranium-lead dating, the kind of method that typically yields ages in the millions of years. 1Turner et al., “Extinct 244Pu in Ancient Zircons,” Science, Vol 306, Issue 5693, 89-91, 1 October 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1101014]. 2Trapp et al., “Numerical calibration of the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary: Two new U-Pb isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry single-zircon ages from Hasselbachtal (Sauerland, Germany),” Geology, Vol. 32, No. 10, pp. 857�860, doi: 10.1130/G20644.1. Notice what Turner’s group did.  First, they assumed what they need to prove: that the rocks were really 4.2 billion years old.  The age of the solar system (4.56 billion years old) and the age of the meteorites was not open to negotiation: these were givens, assumed from the start.  Then notice the extremely minute amounts they had to work with: crystals weighing a few millionths of a gram.  The xenon they were looking for was below the detection threshold of most instruments; how can anyone be sure that their laser instrument, which detected a few thousand atoms in the crystal, did not disrupt the atoms in the process?  (Xenon, after all, is a gas.)  Then notice that only 25% of their 8 samples met expectations, so the rest had to be explained away.  Well, look at the explanation!  The crystals were subject to violent, metamorphic processes of heating and recrystallization, and even though lead is more easily leached from the samples, the lead remained somehow and the xenon was lost.     These eight tiny zircons were found in detrital deposits.  According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, detritus is: “(1) loose material (as rock fragments or organic particles) that results directly from disintegration (2) a product of disintegration, destruction, or wearing away.”  How can any geochemist possibly know these itty bitty crystals, after presumably billions of years of plate tectonics, volcanism, erosion and weathering, hark back from the birth of the earth?  How can they know the composition of a presumed solar nebula, and the amount of processing and mixing of elements that occurred before the crust of the earth solidified?  Does any reader feel any confidence that this experiment tells us anything at all about the history of the earth billions of years ago?  Don’t be a sucker.  Zircons exist in the present, not in the past, and they don’t come with dates stamped on them.  To weave a story about what these rocks were doing 4.2 billion years ago requires many assumptions which are impossible to prove.  It also requires ignoring many other well-understood processes that show the earth could not possibly be that old.     To show that the Turner et al. paper was not an isolated case of cherry-picking data, the second paper in Geology should support the assertion that radiometric dating is fraught with circular reasoning, selective evidence and extrapolation (see also 09/20/2004 where Richard Kerr points out some of the nasty “little details that don’t make it into the literature,” especially the picking and choosing of data they like).  Again, this team tossed out over half the samples that yielded dates too old for their needs.  Some were found to be almost six times as old, which would have put them deep into the Precambrian.  To end up in this volcanic ash deposit, therefore, those older zircons would have had to survive at least one trip through a volcano’s throat, maybe many (after all, a lot can happen in 1.684 billion years, plus or minus 1.683995 billion).  The team just whisked away this difficulty with the statement, “the abundance of Precambrian ages is a remarkable feature.”  OK, let’s hear some more remarks.  In addition, six of the ten samples taken from another boundary bed “are based on pyramids broken off from whole zircon crystals, and these fragments are typically free of inherited core material,” according to more assumptions.  We think readers who hear about “absolute ages” determined from radiometric dating need to see the amount of hand-waving and hocus pocus that goes on in the inner sanctums of the Darwin Party chemistry labs.     The ratio that counts in any dating method is not the Pu/U ratio or the U/Pb, but the O/A ratio (observations to assumptions).  A conservative dating approach would observe present processes carefully and measure the rate of change, then try to set an upper limit on how long that process could operate, with a minimum of extrapolation: “this phenomenon cannot be more than x years old” (because, sooner or later, the source will run out, or the product will be saturated).  A liberal approach to dating, on the other hand, requires a lot of extrapolation.  It tries to set a lower limit on the age of something: “this phenomenon cannot be less than y years old.”  The conservative approach has a vastly higher observation-to-assumption ratio.  For instance, we’ve only known about radioactive decay for around 100 years.  Conservatively, we can extrapolate backward or forward a little, but should exercise caution beyond one or two orders of magnitude.  Most evolutionary geologists, however, recklessly extrapolate the observed rates of decay by seven orders of magnitude!     Even if radioactive decay rates could be trusted so far back, knowing that our theories of fundamental physics continue to undergo revolutions (e.g., dark energy, exotic particles, string theory), this paper illustrates that no one can know the initial conditions or subsequent processes that might have altered the samples, without making other assumptions.  Counting atoms and measuring current decay rates may be hard science, but the conclusions are embedded in an assumption-ridden context.  Astrologers were very good observers of the motions of the planets, but the accuracy of their measurements did not justify their assumptions.  Before accepting any conclusion pronounced by the wizards, always separate the observations from the assumptions.  Respect observations; doubt assumptions.(Visited 28 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Read More →

Springboks do South Africa proud

first_imgSpringbok wing Bryan Habana after scoring his third try in the match against USA, which drew him level with Jonah Lomu’s record of 15 World Cup tries. (Image: World Rugby via YouTube)Johannesburg, Wednesday 7 October 2015 – The Springboks have once again flown the South African flag proudly in their fourth and final Group B match of the 2015 Rugby World Cup.With this successful game against the USA, the Springboks now lead the South African charge into the quarter finals of the Rugby World Cup.Congratulating the team on their outstanding success in their match against the USA, Brand South Africa’s CEO Kingsley Makhubela said, “Our team in green and gold carried the hopes of the South African nation into the Olympic Stadium in London and emerged with a splendid victory.”“Your valiant spirit and unwavering determination on the sports field embodies the resilience and tenacity of the South African nation. Your excellent teamwork highlights the way South Africans come together to achieve to do great things for our country. Brand South Africa and the South African nation salute you and wish you well in your next encounter in the quarter finals of the Rugby World Cup. We stand with you wherever we are,” concluded Mr Makhubela.last_img read more

Read More →

U.S. takes possible first step toward regulating nanochemicals

first_imgThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is ratcheting up its scrutiny of nanoscale chemicals amid concerns that they could pose unique environmental and health risks. Late last month, the agency proposed requiring companies to submit data on industrial nanomaterials that they already make and sell. Observers say EPA’s move could be a prelude to tighter federal regulation of nanomaterials, which have begun to show up in consumer products.For years, EPA has grappled with whether and how to use the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the nation’s leading chemical regulation law, to handle nanomaterials. TSCA is silent on nanoproducts, generally defined as materials composed of structures between 1 and 100 billionths of a meter. But many environmental groups worry that they potentially carry unknown risks by virtue of their size. Other observers, however, have argued that size alone shouldn’t trigger new regulation and that existing rules are adequate to deal with the new products.EPA’s 25 March proposal actually walks back an earlier version—now scrapped—that would have let the agency more easily clamp down on any new uses of nanomaterials. Still, the weaker version being proposed now represents the first time EPA would use its powers under TSCA to request information specifically on nanomaterials. (The proposal comes as Congress is debating revamping TSCA, which has drawn extensive criticism.)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Under the rule, manufacturers would have to submit a range of data regarding the nanoscale substances they now make and that fall under TSCA’s scope—such as substances used in industrial applications. EPA wants to know how much the company is producing, for example, as well as potential public exposures, and manufacturing and processing methods. It also wants see any existing health and safety data. In addition, the agency would require manufacturers of proposed new nanomaterials to submit existing data before they want to start making and selling those substances.The rule wouldn’t force companies to generate any new health and safety data. And by itself, the rule wouldn’t restrict any nanomaterials’ use, EPA notes in its draft proposal. The agency’s actions “do not conclude and are not intended to conclude that nanoscale materials as a class, or specific uses of nanoscale materials, necessarily give rise to or are likely to cause harm,” the notice states. Rather, EPA says the information would let it better assess nanomaterials’ risks.And the agency states that its approach would help protect human health and the environment “without prejudging new technologies or creating unnecessary barriers to trade or hampering innovation.” EPA argues that case-by-case approach would jibe with a set of nanotech regulation principles released in 2011 by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Those principles advise agencies against making one-size-fits-all judgments.The American Chemistry Council (ACC), the largest chemical industry trade group, is still evaluating the proposal, it said in a statement. But it “is particularly interested in how EPA defines the materials to be covered by the proposed rule,” says Jay West, manager of ACC’s Nanotechnology Panel, says in the statement.The proposal is “logical” and “creatively written,” says Lynn Bergeson, a managing partner with the law firm Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. in Washington, D.C., which advises companies on EPA regulatory compliance. Some companies may argue the rule is too broad or burdensome, she says, or worry that EPA’s move could stigmatize their products. But the government effort to collect information could potentially help the industry by reassuring a skeptical public, she adds. “If there are no data on which EPA is able to rely to conclude that there is no risk, then the agency really is not doing its job,” she says.The proposal is a good first step for EPA, says Jaydee Hanson, policy director at the International Center for Technology Assessment, a group in Washington, D.C., that has raised concerns about nanotechnology’s potential risks. But he worries that many companies might simply not respond and that the cash-strapped EPA would struggle to crack down on violators. And he worries that the proposal would let companies keep too much information secret, by claiming it as confidential business information. (TSCA reforms that Congress is debating would limit the types of information that companies could claim as confidential, he notes.) But Hanson is looking on the bright side. “We wish [EPA was] doing more, but we’re excited that they are doing it,” he says.Still, even with all the new information in hand, it’s unclear how much action EPA could take to restrict nanomaterials under current law. In general, EPA has moved slowly to regulate new chemicals, and struggled to meet the burden that TSCA sets on it for removing, restricting, or preventing the sale of chemicals found to be unsafe. Congress says it wants to make that process easier, but it is unclear how any new rules would apply to nanotechnologies.last_img read more

Read More →