Trade minister reported to police by business partner for alleged fraud

first_imgThe lawyer added that the settlement money was related to a profit-sharing dispute between Yulius, Agus and other partners involved in a nickel ore mining and transportation project owned by diversified mining company PT Aneka Tambang (Antam) in North Maluku. Yulius claimed his company PT Yudistira Bumi Bhakti was supposed to receive US$84.2 million in profit from Agus’ business consolidation.Husdi said the dispute had been reported to the police in 2014 and that the police had named one of Agus’ colleagues a suspect. The lawyer added that Yulius accepted a peace offering of Rp 500 billion at the time and dropped the case. However, the payment was never made.Husdi said Agus did not respond to a legal notice sent by him and his client, prompting him to report the minister to the police.Read also: Politicians on economic team raise eyebrows Trade Minister Agus Suparmanto has been reported to the police by a former business partner over allegations of fraud and embezzlement of Rp 500 billion (US$36.3 million). Lawyer Husdi Herman said his client Yulius Isyudianto reported Agus to the police on Jan. 8 because Yulius had not received settlement money he claimed had been promised by Agus in 2014.“We reported him as an individual. The lawsuit is not related to his position as a minister,” he told journalists on Monday as quoted by wartakota.tribunnews.com. Responding to the matter, Agus’ lawyer, Petrus Bala Pattyona, said he had sent two legal notices to Yulius because the report was “fabricated and fictitious.” “The report is baseless and not supported by any evidence,” Petrus said, adding that Husdi and Agus had yet to respond to his legal notices.Petrus refused to provide a detailed explanation regarding the issue as police investigators were still investigating the report. He said his client was ready to provide a statement to the police.National Police spokesman Brig. Gen. Argo Yuwono said the police would follow up on Yulius’ report by “clarifying the report to the plaintiff as well as questioning witnesses and looking at evidence.” Should investigators find enough evidence, the police will continue the investigation, the spokesperson went on to say.”If investigators do not find any proof of a criminal violation, the investigation will be stopped,” Argo said. (eyc)Topics :last_img read more

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From sex scandals to impeachment: The unsinkable Donald Trump

first_imgOn October 7, 2016, one month before the presidential election, a decade-old recording is released on which Trump is heard talking about women in extremely crude terms.The now infamous “Access Hollywood” tape features Trump — then the billionaire host of the hit reality show “The Apprentice” — boasting that his celebrity gave him license to grope women with impunity.”When you’re a star, they let you do it,” he said. “You can do anything. Grab ’em by the pussy. You can do anything.”As prominent Republicans voiced their disgust, the scandal appeared set to derail Trump’s White House bid — as pundits widely predicted it would cost him the women’s vote. Impeached for abuse of power, President Donald Trump’s acquittal by the Senate is just the latest escape for the real estate tycoon turned politician who has repeatedly defied the odds.The following are some of the events that could have torpedoed his political fortunes: ‘Grab ’em’  They were proven wrong. Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton to win the presidency the following month, ultimately garnering 52 percent support among white women voters. At least 17 women have accused Trump of sexual harassment or sexual assault — accusations the president has denied.  Charlottesville On August 12, 2017, white supremacist, neo-Nazi and anti-Semitic groups — emboldened by Trump’s election on an anti-immigration platform — gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia for a rally.Counter-protesters flocked to the city and clashes broke out. One neo-Nazi deliberately ploughed his car into a crowd of protesters, killing a 32-year-old woman.Trump reacted to the clashes by saying there were “very fine people” on both sides.His comments sparked a wave of indignation including in his own Republican Party. But the outrage soon faded, and Trump was able to move on from the incident.The porn star A year into Trump’s presidency, in January 2018, a former porn star known as Stormy Daniels — real name Stephanie Clifford — came forward to allege she had a tryst with Trump a decade earlier, and that he paid her to keep quiet.Trump’s longtime lawyer Michael Cohen later admitted paying Clifford $130,000 in hush money just weeks before the 2016 election. But while Cohen has since been jailed for violating campaign finance laws, Trump escaped largely unscathed by the lurid revelations — which did little to dent his support even among religious conservatives.  Mueller investigation In May 2017, former FBI director Robert Mueller was named as special counsel to investigate whether any members of Trump’s presidential campaign conspired with Russia to get him elected, as well as subsequent efforts by the president to obstruct justice.The Mueller probe uncovered a trail of misdeeds that led to charges against half a dozen former Trump associates including his former campaign manager Paul Manafort, confidant Roger Stone, former top aide Michael Flynn and Cohen.Rejected by Trump as a “witch hunt,” the probe cast a long shadow over the White House throughout the first half of his presidency.Although the 22 month investigation did not exonerate Trump, Mueller adhered to a Justice Department policy against charging sitting presidents — which ultimately allowed Trump to declare himself cleared.- The elusive tax returns -Trump is the first US president since Richard Nixon not to have made his tax returns public, claiming they are under audit by the Internal Revenue Service.In October 2016, The New York Times revealed that Trump reported over $1 billion in business losses in 1995 — potentially allowing him to avoid paying income tax for two decades.Democrats in the House of Representatives have since turned to the courts to force the release of Trump’s tax returns and other records in cases that are considered a crucial test of the separation of powers.But the president has so far managed to rebuff their demands, with the cases tied up in the US court system.Topics :last_img read more

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House joins experts to push for lockdown against COVID-19

first_img“The House is calling on the government and the people to be disciplined in practicing social distancing,” she added.The central government has sent mixed messages as regards its COVID-19 prevention and control measures, with the President seemingly engaged in a policy spat with regional administrations on how best to limit the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and COVID-19, the disease it causes. Some regional administrations, including Jakarta, have called for a policy resembling a lockdown, but the President has said that the regions had no jurisdiction to issue such a measure. Meanwhile, the central government has been undecided on whether it would resort to imposing a lockdown. The country’s scientists have also suggested a lockdown for areas been deemed “hot zones” to contain the virus’ spread ahead of the Ramadan fasting month in April and the Idul Fitri Islamic holiday in May. Indonesia has reported 227 confirmed cases of COVID-19 to date.Public health specialist Nurul Nadia Luntungan of the Center for Indonesia’s Strategic Development Initiatives (CISDI) called for the government to be “assertive” in imposing its social distancing policy, rather than issuing a mere appeal as it had. She stressed that strict social distancing was needed to minimize deaths, and added that people with moderate to severe symptoms of the disease could be treated at hospitals. Nurul also noted that Indonesia’s lackluster approach to COVID-19 testing raised the possibility of cases going undetected, particularly asymptomatic cases that could then unknowingly transmit the virus to others without a strict protocol to restrict public interaction. This could overwhelm healthcare facilities in the country, which were unprepared to manage the outbreak.Epidemiologist and biostatistician Pandu Riono at the University of Indonesia concurred, saying that aggressive social distancing measures should be implemented to slow the spread of COVID-19 and minimize possible transmission to high-risk populations. Slowing the rate of infection, or  “flattening the curve”, would in turn prevent overburdening the country’s limited healthcare facilities and workers.However, the government must first establish interinstitutional coordination and secure the supply and distribution of basic goods before imposing such measures to ensure their effectiveness, he said. “The government lacks command. They are confused […] despite the existence of guidelines they can follow and lessons from other countries,” Pandu told The Jakarta Post on Tuesday.Pandu also believed that community transmission had been occurring in Indonesia since January, and that cases remained largely undetected due to lack of testing.Deputy chairman Mulfachri Harahap of House Commission III, which oversees legal affairs, suggested that the government seriously consider imposing a lockdown, pointing to China’s success in bringing the local epidemic under control after imposing a nationwide lockdown.”I appreciate the efforts of the government’s rapid response team in containing the virus, but I’m also waiting for the policies,” said the National Mandate Party (PAN) politician.Former president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono also called on the Jokowi administration to take a more serious approach to the coronavirus by adjusting existing policies, noting that the government appeared to have underestimated the virus. The Democratic Party patron expressed concern that Indonesia would see an explosion in the number of cases when other countries were seeing declines in infection, and that the government’s belated response could turn Indonesia into “the new epicenter” of the pandemic.With the number of new cases in China dropping daily to near zero in recent weeks, the epicenter of the pandemic had now shifted to Europe.Yudhoyono also noted that several countries and cities had imposed lockdowns to save lives, and that in such areas, people were prohibited from leaving their homes and places that could host large crowds, like restaurants and malls, had been closed.“Some people may be uncomfortable about this policy, which also carries risks, including economic losses, but such policies and actions [are necessary]. Public health and safety should be prioritized above all else,” he emphasized.Fadholi, a NasDem Party lawmaker of the ruling coalition who is also on the House’s public health commission, also called on the government to impose a lockdown.”Some countries are responding quickly to the pandemic by imposing a  lockdown. The government should study [how to implement the policy] from this point forth,” he insisted. Topics : Calls are mounting for President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo to take extreme measures to stop the spread of the novel coronavirus, including implementing a localized quarantine or partial lockdown, despite concerns over executing such a measure. House of Representatives Speaker Puan Maharani, as well as both government and opposition lawmakers, have demanded the Jokowi administration enforce stricter measures by implementing a localized quarantine as stipulated in the 2018 Health Quarantine Law, saying that many people were ignoring the President’s call to practice social distancing. “The House of Representatives supports [taking] the measure to mitigate [the spread of] the COVID-19 pandemic by implementing social distancing and localized quarantine policies as stipulated under the 2018 law on health quarantine,” Puan said in a statement on Monday. last_img read more

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South Korea’s Moon warns of COVID-19 second wave as cases rebound

first_imgThe death toll remained at 256.Health Minister Park Neung-hoo said the government will decide on whether it will reopen schools in stages starting from May 13 as planned after examining the impact of the nightclub cases for two to three days.Battling the first major coronavirus outbreak outside China, South Korea brought infections of the virus, and the disease COVID-19 that it causes, down drastically through widespread testing, aggressive contact tracing and tracking apps. The response has helped Asia’s fourth-largest economy come to grips with the pandemic without extensive the lockdowns seen elsewhere.The daily tally of new infections had hovered around 10 or less in recent weeks, with no or very few domestic cases over the past 10 days. South Korea warned of a second wave of the new coronavirus on Sunday as infections rebounded to a one-month high, just as the authorities were starting to ease some pandemic restrictions.”It’s not over until it’s over,” President Moon Jae-in told the nation, saying a new cluster shows the virus can spread widely at any time, and warning of a second wave late this year.The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) reported 34 new infections, the highest since April 9, after a small outbreak emerged around a slew of nightclubs, prompting the authorities to temporary close all nightly entertainment facilities around the capital. Topics :center_img The fresh outbreak comes just as the government was easing some social distancing restrictions and moving to fully reopen schools and businesses, in a transition from intensive social distancing to “distancing in daily life.””We must never lower our guard regarding epidemic prevention,” Moon said in a televised speech marking the third anniversary of his inauguration. “We are in a prolonged war. I ask everyone to comply with safety precautions and rules until the situation is over even after resuming daily lives.”He said the KCDC will get greater power as part of the long-term fight and be renamed the Disease Control and Prevention Administration to reflect its enhanced position, while the authorities beef up local expertise.The resurgence is driven by an outbreak centered around a handful of Seoul nightclubs, which a man in his late 20s had visited before testing positive last week.At least 24 out of the 26 new domestically transmitted infections were traced to that man, bringing the infections related to the case to 54, the KCDC said.The KCDC said officials are tracking down about 1,900 people who have gone to the clubs, which could be increased to 7,000, asking anyone who was there last week to self-isolate for 14 days and be tested.”This case is once again showing a rapid spread of the virus as well as high infectiousness,” KCDC director Jeong Eun-kyeong told a briefing. “We’re in a battle against time to head off additional transmissions in the local communities.” last_img read more

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Games postponed as MLB rocked by virus outbreak

first_imgTopics : Player concern The postponements came with Major League Baseball less than a week into its abbreviated 2020 season.The season finally got under way last Thursday four months after it had been due to open in March.  Games are taking place without fans, while players are subject to a range of strict health and safety protocols designed to prevent outbreaks of COVID-19.Unlike other sports leagues, such as Major League Soccer and the NBA, which are restarting their seasons with teams based at a single location, baseball has opted to leave clubs at their home ballparks, meaning they must travel throughout the United States during the season.That decision has been criticized as risky by health experts as swathes of the US are battling skyrocketing coronavirus cases.Several star players had also expressed misgivings about attempting to start the season while the pandemic raged, with some opting out of the 2020 season altogether.Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher David Price was among those who elected to skip the season citing concerns over safety protocols.On Monday, Price said the Marlins outbreak would be a test of MLB’s commitment to player safety.”Now we REALLY get to see if MLB is going to put players health first,” Price wrote on Twitter. “Remember when Manfred said players health was PARAMOUNT?! Part of the reason I’m at home right now is because players health wasn’t being put first.”I can see that hasn’t changed.”Dave Martinez, the manager of the World Series-winning Washington Nationals, also expressed concerns over the outbreak.Martinez — who underwent a heart procedure last year — admitted to feeling uneasy over the prospect of taking Washington to Miami to face the Marlins this weekend.”I’m going to be honest with you, I’m scared. I really am,” Martinez said. “You don’t know, because of my heart condition, what happens to me if I do get it. I have to be extra careful.” The Yankees were due to use the same locker room at Philadelphia’s Citizens Bank Park that the Marlins had used over the weekend.Marlins chief executive Derek Jeter said postponing Monday’s game in Florida was the “correct decision.” “The health of our players and staff has been and will continue to be our primary focus as we navigate through these uncharted waters,” Jeter said.”Postponing tonight’s home opener was the correct decision to ensure we take a collective pause and try to properly grasp the totality of this situation.”Jeter said the Marlins had remained in Philadelphia to undergo further testing.Baseball chief Manfred meanwhile said the Marlins could return to play as soon as Wednesday depending on the outcome of testing.”Our first concern is the health of the players, and their families and making sure that we do everything possible to minimize the spread of the virus amongst our employees,” Manfred told MLB Network.”The Miami Marlins will not play tonight and tomorrow. We’re doing additional testing. If the test results are acceptable, the Marlins will resume play in Baltimore on Wednesday.” An outbreak of COVID-19 rocked Major League Baseball on Monday, forcing the postponement of multiple games less than a week after the sport launched its season following a four-month coronavirus delay.Major League Baseball confirmed in a statement that games between the Miami Marlins and Baltimore Orioles in Florida, and the Philadelphia Phillies and New York Yankees in Pennsylvania, had been scrapped.The decision followed reports that 10 more members of the Marlins — eight players and two coaches — had tested positive for the coronavirus following Sunday’s game against the Phillies in Philadelphia. Four Marlins players — pitcher Jose Urena, first baseman Garrett Cooper, outfielder Harold Ramirez and catcher Jorge Alfaro — had already tested positive for COVID-19.Major League Baseball said in a statement the games had been postponed in order to allow for additional testing.”The members of the Marlins’ travelling party are self-quarantining in place while awaiting the outcome of those results,” the MLB statement said.In a separate announcement later Monday, MLB commissioner Rob Manfred said that the Marlins game against Baltimore on Tuesday had also been called off.last_img read more

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Only eight students selected for national flag-hoisting ceremony this year

first_imgThe dozens of students from across Indonesia marching in step for the national flag-hoisting ceremony will be absent from television screens this year as the government has cut the flag bearer team to only eight members.In the traditional formation before the pandemic, 68 national flag bearers (Paskibraka), representing the country’s 34 provinces, would hoist the Merah Putih (red and white) flag at Merdeka Palace in Central Jakarta on Aug. 17.On Thursday, President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo officiated the eight students, all members of last year’s Paskibraka team, to send them off for Indonesia’s 75th Independence Day ceremony on Monday. “May God the Almighty give you grace and ease in carrying out this duty for the country,” Jokowi said during the inauguration ceremony, which was live-streamed on the Presidential Secretariat’s YouTube channel.The eight Paskibraka members are high school students from eight provinces:They include Indrian Puspita Rahmadhani from senior high school SMAN 1 Bireuen in Aceh, I Gusti Agung Bagus Kade Sangga Eirav Adhita from SMAN 1 Mendoyo in Bali, Sudrajat Prawijaya from SMAN 4 Rejang Lebong in Bengkulu and Muhammad Arief Wijaya from SMAN 2 Kendari in North Sulawesi.They also include Muhammad Asri Maulana from SMAN 1 Kandangan in South Kalimantan, Dhea Lukita Andriana from SMAN 1 Ngunut Tulungagung in East Java, Muhammad Adzan from MAN 2 Bima in West Nusa Tenggara and Sylvia Kartika Putri from SMA Kartika 1-4 Pematang Siantar in North Sumatra.Topics :last_img read more

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Soekarno-Hatta Airport forms task force to handle kites around runways

first_imgRead also: Garuda Indonesia spends thousands of dollars to repair aircraft damaged by kitesHe added the task force had been holding webinars and visiting several subdistricts located around the airport to disseminate the information. It had also put up banners warning people about the penalty for flying kites in the flight operation safety area.Febri claimed the number of kite-related complaints and disturbances had started to decline after the task force began educating local residents about the potential hazard caused by kites.Flying a kite around an airport is considered dangerous because it can tangle up inside an airplane’s engine.The 2009 Aviation Law restricts flying kites around flight operation areas, with Article 421 of the law carrying a punishment of up to three years of imprisonment and a Rp 1 billion (US$67,776) fine for violations. (aly)Topics : State-owned airport operator PT Angkasa Pura II has formed a task force to prevent people from flying kites around the flight zone of Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Tangerang, Banten.Airport spokesperson Febri Toga Simatupang said the task force would educate local residents about the potential dangers of flying kites around the airport.“We have created a team of local officials and figures to educate the residents,” Febri said on Friday, as quoted by kompas.com.last_img read more

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Half of all construction contractors close down as projects stall: Association

first_imgIn addition to project cancellations, contractors have also allocated additional expenditure for COVID-19 transmission prevention equipment and health protocol implementation during the construction process.“We hope the Public Works and Housing Ministry will restart the infrastructure projects in rural regions that were canceled by local administrations. If the ministry has projects, please include small contractors,” Agusti said.The pandemic has taken a toll on infrastructure development globally. In Indonesia, supply chain disruptions have slowed the construction of ongoing projects, while the reallocation of state funds to social programs has decreased the amount of funds going to new projects.The public works ministry’s budget has been slashed by Rp 34.5 trillion (US$2.3 billion) as part of the government’s latest budget reallocation program to finance the government’s COVID-19 mitigation effort and economic stimulus. The hit to demand has not only been felt by small construction providers. State-owned construction giant PT Wijaya Karya (Wika) also slashed in August its new contract target for 2020 by a third to Rp 21.38 trillion due to project postponements during the pandemic.Wika president director Agung Budi Waskito said on Aug. 26 that the company had struggled to book contracts in the first half of the year as many projects had been postponed as a result of the social restriction measures imposed to limit the spread of COVID-19.“As of the second quarter we have achieved Rp 3.4 trillion. We will gain the rest in the third quarter, especially in the fourth quarter,” said Agung.Construction project cancellations have also hurt the revenue of producers of building materials, such as cement and industrial explosives.Indonesia Cement Association (ASI) data show that nationwide cement demand, a key indicator of domestic consumption, fell to 12.52 million tons in the April to June period, down from 13.75 million tons in the same period last year. Cement sales in the first half of the year have dipped 7.72 percent year-on-year (yoy) nationwide to 27.1 million tons, according to the association’s data.Meanwhile, state-owned explosive maker PT Dahana’s operation director Bambang Agung said that the company aimed to expand its market penetration into Australia, as the domestic market for industrial explosive dried up.“We see Australia becoming a promising market for explosives, particularly for mining purposes such as in the Northern Territory and Western Australia,” he said during the Markplus discussion.Dahana exported in April 215 tons of explosives to Australia, up from 123.5 tons in 2019.Bambang also echoed Agusti’s statement, saying that field operational costs had been increasing as the company needed to provide additional safety measures for COVID-19 prevention.“Cash flow control became our primary focus due to the halting of projects and the extra spending for health protocol implementation. We have seen our profit decrease slightly due to the current situation,” he said.Topics : Around 50 percent of the country’s construction companies have permanently shut down their businesses as of July, with small firms taking the biggest hit, amid project delays and cancellations in both the public and private sectors, an association has said.Indonesia Building Contractor Association (Akbarindo) chairperson Agusti Mirawat said Tuesday that small contractors in rural areas were losing business, as local administrations cut their budgets for infrastructure projects and maintenance to fund COVID-19 containment measures.“Around one half of construction service providers have been lost as many projects, particularly in rural regions, are being scrapped by local administrations. On average, administrations have reallocated 40 percent of their infrastructure budgets to fight the pandemic,” he said during an online discussion held by marketing consulting firm Markplus.last_img read more

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Pfizer vaccine trial bets on early win against coronavirus, documents show

first_imgPfizer’s clinical trial protocol outlines for the company, scientists and regulators how the drugmaker could show that its vaccine meets efficacy and safety standards set by the US Food and Drug Administration.A company’s protocol is submitted to the FDA for review and is overseen by an independent panel of experts known as a Data and Safety Monitoring Board.The protocol calls for a first assessment of the vaccine’s performance by the monitoring board after 32 participants in the trial become infected with the novel coronavirus. So far, more than 29,000 people have enrolled in the trial that started in July, some receiving the vaccine and the others receiving a placebo.The FDA has said that a coronavirus vaccine must prove to be at least 50 percent more effective than a placebo in a large-scale trial to be considered for approval. However, a smaller sample of infections in a clinical trial changes the calculation of how that standard is met, according to researchers. Pfizer’s vaccine would need to be at least 76.9% effective to show it works based on 32 infections, according to its protocol. That would mean that no more than six of those coronavirus cases would have occurred among people who received the vaccine, the documents showed.If the drugmaker’s vaccine does not meet the 76.9% efficacy target at this first interim analysis, it would face tougher statistical significance thresholds during subsequent interim assessments, biostatisticians who reviewed the protocol said.Pfizer said its interim analyses were designed to show conclusive evidence “as quickly as possible amid the devastating pandemic if our vaccine meets the stringent standards set by FDA.” Pfizer would not say whether it would use an interim analysis as the basis for seeking approval.The FDA declined to comment on whether it would consider such data sufficient for approval.Sufficient evidence?Interim analyses typically are used by data and safety monitoring boards to determine whether an experimental drug appears safe and effective enough to continue a trial, or whether it should be stopped if a safety problem arises.But if a vaccine meets FDA benchmarks at an interim analysis without any serious safety problems, it could make sense to use it as a basis for authorization to help curb a pandemic that has killed about 940,000 people globally, said Thomas Lumley, chair of biostatistics at the University of Auckland in New Zealand.Moderna Inc, another front-runner in the vaccine race, told Reuters it would seek emergency FDA authorization to use its vaccine in high-risk groups if an interim assessment of its trial showed its vaccine was at least 70 percent effective.Moderna, which made its protocols public on Thursday, said its first interim analysis of 53 infections is likely to come in November.Some vaccine experts have said drugmakers should wait to reach their final analyses of more than 150 cases before seeking FDA approval. They note the speed at which vaccines are being developed for COVID-19, compressing what can be a decade-long process into months.Relying on the more limited interim analyses could overstate a vaccine’s effectiveness simply because not enough trial participants fell ill, they have said. Moving more quickly through the trial process also means a drugmaker could miss potential side effects that could materialize if trials were given more time.”These interim analyses have a flashing sign of short cuts,” said Eric Topol, director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute in La Jolla, California. “You miss safety issues and you may very well exaggerate the benefits.”In addition to Pfizer and Moderna, Reuters reviewed the clinical trial protocols for vaccine candidates developed by AstraZeneca Plc and Johnson & Johnson.AstraZeneca set its first interim analysis when about 40 coronavirus infections are reported among participants. Its US trial is currently on hold after a patient fell ill. J&J’s first analysis would begin at 20 infections, according to the protocol of their large-scale trial due to begin on Sept. 21.AstraZeneca and J&J declined to comment. Topics :center_img Pfizer Inc is betting that its coronavirus vaccine candidate will show clear evidence of effectiveness early in its clinical trial, according to the company and internal documents reviewed by Reuters that describe how the trial is being run.In recent weeks, Pfizer has said it should know by the end of October whether the vaccine, developed together with Germany’s BioNTech SE, is safe and effective. If the vaccine is shown to work by then, Pfizer has said it would quickly seek regulatory approval. It has not said what data it would use.President Donald Trump, who is seeking re-election, has said a vaccine to fight the coronavirus pandemic is possible before the Nov. 3 US vote, raising concerns over political interference. Scientists have questioned whether drugmakers will have enough evidence to achieve success by that time.last_img read more

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COVID-19 test officer accused of sexual harassment disappears

first_imgA medical worker accused of sexual misconduct and extortion by a person who underwent a rapid COVID-19 test at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Tangerang, Banten, has disappeared after being named a suspect.Jakarta Police spokesperson Sr. Comr. Yusri Yunus said the police had complete information about the suspect and had deployed a team to hunt him down.“Our team checked the rooming house he was staying, and he wasn’t there,” Yusri told reporters on Wednesday, as quoted by kompas.com. Read also: Soekarno-Hatta Police receive report of sexual harassment during COVID-19 testPreviously, the Soekarno-Hatta Airport Police’s criminal investigation unit named the accused a suspect but did not immediately arrest him.The Jakarta Police have checked CCTV footage and asked for clarification from the COVID-19 test organizer at the airport.The story went viral after the victim shared her experience on Twitter, saying the incident occurred on Sept. 13 when she was about to fly to Nias, North Sumatra.In response, clinical laboratory firm PT Kimia Farma Diagnostika, a subsidiary of publicly listed pharmaceutical company PT Kimia Farma, has said it will pursue legal action against the medical worker, who is an employee of the company. (syk)Topics :last_img read more

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