Serena Williams at No 28 In WTA Rankings Climbs

LONDON (AP) — Serena Williams climbed 153 spots in the WTA rankings after her runner-up finish at Wimbledon, putting her back in the top 30.Williams is ranked 28th in the list published Monday. At Wimbledon, the former No. 1 was playing only her fourth tournament after returning from childbirth but still reached the final before losing to Angelique Kerber of Germany. Kerber climbed six spots to No. 4, with Simona Halep holding onto the top ranking despite going out in the third round at the All England Club.Kevin Anderson climbed into the men’s top 5 for the first time after his run to the Wimbledon final put him in fifth place, while champion Novak Djokovic jumped 11 spots to No. 10. Rafael Nadal, who lost to Djokovic in the semifinals, remains No. 1. read more

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Be Wary Of These Overachievers When Filling Out Your Bracket

Largely disregarded going into the season, Northern Iowa and Butler have put together great years. Butler, unranked nationally and picked to finish seventh in the 10-team Big East back in October, placed second in the conference and finished 22nd in both the AP and Coaches’ polls. Northern Iowa exceeded expectations by an even greater margin, finishing 12th in Ken Pomeroy’s ratings (with a gaudy 30-3 record) despite being pegged for 74th in the preseason.Looking ahead to the NCAA tournament, the way both teams are seeded makes them favored to win at least one tournament game, with a puncher’s chance at even more.Great story, right? Well, sure, but our research has shown that even after a stellar season, it’s hard for such teams to completely shake off their humble beginnings. While a team’s statistical power rating will tend to stabilize late in the season, the residue of preseason expectations seems to have a lingering effect.To illustrate, I compiled pre-tourney Simple Rating System (SRS) grades for every NCAA tournament-bound team since the dawn of the 64-team-bracket era in 1985. I also crafted preseason projected SRS scores for each school using a weighted, regressed-to-the-mean average of its SRS ratings over the preceding two seasons.1For the curious: I gave a weight of 67 percent to the previous year’s score, 22 percent to the team’s score for the year before that, and 11 percent to the NCAA-average SRS score of zero. When attempting to predict the outcome of a given NCAA tournament game, the difference between a team’s seasonal SRS rating and that of its opponent clearly carries the greatest weight. But the difference between the teams’ preseason SRS projections can also alter a team’s probability of winning a tournament game by as many as 5 percentage points.This dynamic even extends to highly ranked teams such as Maryland, who finished 8th in the final AP poll after beginning the year unranked. Teams of that ilk have historically won about 25 percent fewer NCAA tournament games than they ought to have, given where they were seeded. And our model says the Terrapins are on the same track; while No. 4 seeds traditionally win about 1.5 games per tournament, our model projects an average of just 1.2 wins for Maryland in this year’s tournament.So, including Northern Iowa, Butler and Maryland, who are this year’s overachievers to be wary of? Here are this year’s teams, ranked by whose preseason rating differed the most from the non-preseason components of their overall FiveThirtyEight power rating:Check out FiveThirtyEight’s March Madness predictions. read more

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Texas AM Pulled Off A 1in3000 Comeback

When the dust cleared on those 35 seconds, the Aggies had scored six times — for 14 points — in the span of six possessions; they’d also forced four Northern Iowa turnovers in five possessions. They’d tied the game, forcing overtime, and would eventually win in double OT to complete the most bewildering comeback in the history of March Madness.In a certain sense, if each possession is a coin flip to score or not, the Aggies basically flipped heads 10 times in 11 tries — the likelihood of which is about 1 in 171.1That’s maybe even a little generous. According to data from Synergy Sports Tech, the Aggies scored on just 43.5 percent of their possessions this season. But even that vastly understates Texas A&M’s comeback probability, because some of its field goals needed to be 3-pointers, and the pressure exerted by the clock cannot be understated. Even as the Aggies had the ball, trailing by just 2 points with five seconds to play, Northern Iowa was still very likely to win because they only had to avoid giving up the tying bucket.In our database of 15,139 men’s college basketball games since the 2012-13 season,2That’s as much play-by-play data as we have access to in the ESPN database. nine games (including Sunday’s) saw a team come back to win from down 10 or more points with less than two minutes remaining. None of the other eight comebacks was executed in fewer than 62 seconds — nearly twice as much time as Texas A&M had to work with. And in terms of deficits overcome with exactly 35 seconds remaining, 12 points is by far the largest in our database; the previous high had been 8 points, when Canisius fought back against Louisiana-Monroe in December. In more than 570 tries apiece, no team had come back from down 9, 10, 11 or 12 points in 35 seconds over the past four years of Division I men’s basketball. And yet, in those final 35 seconds of regulation, as the turnovers started mounting for Northern Iowa and the points began adding up for Texas A&M, the tide began to turn: Fresh off a miraculous buzzer-beating win over Texas on Friday, the Northern Iowa men’s basketball team had pretty much capped off another upset over a Lone Star State school Sunday night when it led Texas A&M by 12 points with 35 seconds to play in the teams’ second-round NCAA matchup.Sure, the Aggies figured to play out the string hard, gambling for steals and committing fouls, but the game was essentially over — teams simply don’t come back from deficits so large with so little time remaining. In fact, you could have spotted the Panthers half that lead, and victory still would have been practically assured.That’s why our win probability chart considered the Panthers’ victory about as certain as it gets, well above 99.9 percent likely: It was enough to make other historic college basketball comebacks, such as Illinois over Arizona and Duke over Maryland, look downright pedestrian by comparison.In cases like this, it’s difficult to estimate the exact probability of a comeback, just because the model is verging on the realm of hypothetical possibilities instead of observed realities. (It also can’t account for specific, meaningful factors such as the Panthers’ top inbounder, Matt Bohannon, leaving the game with an injury right before his team’s meltdown began.) But based on all of the things our model does take into account, we assigned Texas A&M a 1-in-3,333 chance of winning when its deficit was 12 with 35 seconds left.In other words, you could play out Sunday night’s end-game scenario thousands more times and never once see the Aggies move on to the Sweet 16.For the sake of context, it’s important to remember that a few points are enough to make a very big difference, and that difference is much of what makes Sunday’s comeback so impressive. (For instance, Tracy McGrady’s 13 points in 33 seconds began with the Rockets down 8.) At the season level, the biggest collapses in baseball history have happened over glacial time scales compared with an NCAA Tournament game, and only one might be on the same level as Northern Iowa’s loss: when the 1995 California Angels missed the playoffs despite what FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver estimated to be 8,332-to-1 odds against it. Likewise, in his book “Mathletics,” statistician Wayne Winston estimated the odds against the Buffalo Bills beating the Houston Oilers when they trailed 35-3 with 28 minutes to play in their infamous 1993 playoff game and arrived at 1-in-3,825.Texas A&M’s performance Sunday has joined those games on the outer edge of the probability spectrum, and it’s difficult to imagine any comeback being much more improbable. Then again, in a crazy NCAA Tournament such as this, maybe the Aggies have simply given the next few rounds something to shoot for.Check out FiveThirtyEight’s 2016 March Madness Predictions. read more

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Football Ohio State rolls over Oklahoma 4524 in Norman

OSU senior offensive linesman Pat Elflein prepares for the Buckeyes game against the Oklahoma Sooners on Sept. 17 at Gaylord Family Memorial Stadium. The Buckeyes won 45-24. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorNORMAN, Okla. — The game that was hyped up for weeks fulfilled the desires of many Ohio State football fans in the first half. After a shaky start for the Buckeyes, OSU recovered by rattling off two unanswered touchdowns and never looked back, eventually topping the Sooners 45-24. Oklahoma received the ball and promptly marched down the field before an injury to starting redshirt freshman left guard Cody Ford slowed the opening drive for the Sooners. The drive stalled, and the Buckeyes forced a field goal attempt, which was missed from 27 yards out.Things never got back on track for the Sooners, as Oklahoma would be playing catchup throughout the first half. Junior H-back Curtis Samuel scampered in for a 36-yard touchdown to give the Buckeyes a lead they would never relinquish.It was a night that saw the Buckeyes dominate both the offensive and defensive lines of Oklahoma.“I think we controlled the line of scrimmage,” OSU coach Urban Meyer said. “When you do that you have a good chance of winning the game.”With Oklahoma looking to gain momentum by going for it on fourth down early, the Buckeyes found themselves up 14-0 after an outstanding defensive play.Filling in for injured junior weakside linebacker Dante Booker, sophomore Jerome Baker intercepted a tipped pass from Sooner redshirt junior quarterback Baker Mayfield and turned on the jets for a 68-yard touchdown.“(Junior defensive end) Jayln Holmes, he tipped it,” Baker said. “I looked up and it fell right into my hands.”Oklahoma redshirt sophomore Joe Mixon answered back with a touchdown of his own, returning a kickoff 97 yards for a touchdown. Finding a hole in the middle, Mixon broke free and was nearly untouched throughout the return.Although the score was upheld, video review later revealed that Mixon dropped the ball before crossing the goal line. Although all scoring plays are to be reviewed, the touchdown for the Sooners remained.All questions about the health of redshirt sophomore wide receiver Noah Brown were answered in the first half, as Buckeye fans witnessed three touchdown receptions, with the last one of the first half dropping the jaws of fans throughout the stadium.Being guarded closely in the left corner of the endzone, Brown pinned the ball against the back of Oklahoma cornerback Michiah Quick, maintaining possession and dragging his foot. The score put the Buckeyes up 35-17 with just six seconds left in the half.Brown finished the night with four touchdowns.The Buckeye defense struggled to limit the amount of yards picked up by the Sooners in the first two quarters but kept Oklahoma from gaining the lead. Although OSU surrendered 258 yards in the opening half, the Silver Bullets defended well enough to keep their team in the lead.The second-half was much of the same for the Buckeyes. Smothering defense and a healthy use of Brown in the redzone kept OSU out in front by a large margin.After receiving the second-half kickoff, redshirt junior quarterback J.T. Barrett quickly led OSU down the field, setting Brown up for another touchdown reception, this time from eight yards out. Four of Brown’s five receptions were for touchdowns, while every one of Barrett’s touchdowns were to the redshirt sophomore.The grind-it-out attack used by the Buckeyes quickly wore down Oklahoma in the second half. After Barrett and Brown led OSU for much of the first half, the combination of redshirt freshman running back Mike Weber, Barrett and Samuel took over the game.Finishing the game with an average of 6.1 yards per carry combined, the three players racked up 291 rushing yards throughout the contest.Mayfield struggled again in the second half, as OSU’s tight defense in the secondary and pass rush kept the redshirt junior scrambling from the pocket for much of the second half. He finished his night going 17-for-32 for 226 yards, two touchdowns and two interceptions.The defensive lineman for OSU took into account the mobile ability of Mayfield, and made sure to keep him in check as best as they could.“Sometimes if you were going to win your one-on-one matchup, you couldn’t take it. You had to cage the pocket and collapse him” said OSU redshirt sophomore defensive end Sam Hubbard. “There was one time I beat the tackle so clean that he escaped right away. Stuff like that, you just had to keep him caged and not give him any running lanes because he was out of there really fast.”The Buckeyes even received cheers from the OSU faithful in the Oklahoma crowd. During the third quarter, an “O-H-I-O” erupted in Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium.Outscoring Oklahoma 14-7 in the second half, OSU walked away triumphant with a 45-24 victory. After a week filled with predictions favoring each side, the Buckeyes proved they can perform on the biggest stages.Although OSU was all smiles following the game, redshirt junior cornerback Gareon Conley sustained an upper-body injury during the first half. Conley did not return, and his status is up in the air for Week 4.Meyer said he was unsure of the status of Conley after the game, but said as far as he knew, the redshirt junior was doing well.Next week, the Buckeyes will be on a bye week. After the break, the Buckeyes are scheduled to return to Ohio Stadium to open Big Ten play against the Rutgers Scarlet Knights. Kickoff is set for noon on Oct. 1.This article has been amended with quotes following post game interviews. read more

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Hitchcock deserved the boot

After 59 games, Blue Jackets head coach Ken Hitchcock was finally fired.For many, it comes as no surprise. For others, Hitchcock was a scapegoat for guilty parties all around.But if you know anything about last season’s playoff berth and this season’s continued disappointment, Hitchcock’s departure should seem like a long-overdue farewell.Ultimately, the problem lies herein: When you build a program enough to finally reach the playoffs, you send a message to fans and the NHL community that you’re becoming a legitimate team that can be taken seriously.Yes, the Jackets are a newer program among teams with long-standing histories. Yes, the Jackets have the right to build a program for a few years and work out the kinks. No one holds that against any new team starting from the ground up.But once you make it to the playoffs, it’s like a signal to the executives and stakeholders in the NHL that maybe you’re ready to be a respectable contender in the league. Next season should be a step forward, not a jog a mile back.Last season the Jackets went 41-31-10 in 82 games for 92 points. That’s an adequate showing for a team that was finally breaking through.The Jackets boasted 11 shutouts and were only shut out six times. They ended the season fourth in the Central Division and 16th in the League out of 30 teams. That’s not bad, especially when the Western Conference houses a majority of the best teams in the league.At the time of Hitchcock’s firing, the Jackets were 23-27-9 with a total of 55 points on the season. While they’re 13-9-5 at home, they’re a disappointing 10-18-4 on the road. If that’s not enough, they went 2-9-5 in December and only 7-7 in January.Now, you might be thinking, the season isn’t over yet and it’s too early to criticize and compare. But you have to take into account where they stand compared to last year.In the Western Conference, the Jackets are 14th out of 15 teams. In the league standings, they’re 26th out of 30 teams. They currently sit nine points out of a playoff spot in conference. Can we say “letdown?”But here’s the real kicker. While 18th in the league in goals for, the Jackets have fallen apart in the defensive zone, ranking 29th out of 30 teams in goals against. For a coach that is known for his defensive-minded planning, to be 29th in the league is ridiculous.An even bigger indicator of a downward spiral is attendance. While the recession plays a role in diminishing numbers, after a playoff berth, the general consensus is that there is hype for next season. Ticket sales should go up.But out of 27 home games this season, 16 of them have amassed crowds of less than 15,000. That’s 60 percent of home games pulling in less than 80 percent of seats. With 85.7 percent attendance last season, the numbers show another downturn in Blue Jacket enthusiasm.While Steve Mason’s presence in goal has been dismal this season and the overall effort by the players is lacking, change needs to happen.General Manager Scott Howson said this season has been disappointing all around for fans and the responsibility rests with management, coaches and players. But after announcing Hitchcock’s departure, he explained the most obvious reason.Hitchcock “earned and received the opportunity to turn things around this season,” Howson said. “But unfortunately that has not happened and it has become apparent that change is in the best interest of our organization.”Change. An example would be when Philadelphia Flyers General Manager Paul Holmgren decided to fire coach John Stevens in late November. The team was 13-11-1 and had 27 points on the season. For a team expected to perform well throughout the regular season and compete for the Stanley Cup, .500 hockey was simply unacceptable and a change was necessary.Holmgren brought in Peter Laviolette to replace Stevens, and although the first few games under Laviolette showed no immediate response, in the past few weeks the Flyers have caught fire and are now in the playoff picture.For the Jackets, change is something they need to end the season on a different note. Howson said the necessary change wouldn’t come from trading or releasing players or uprooting management.For Hitchcock, his old-school style of coaching seems to be failing in an ever-changing, fast-paced age of hockey. To keep up, the Jackets made a change. A change for the better. read more

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Brexit will not alter depth of Britains friendship with Germany says Duke

first_imgThe Duke of Cambridge inspects soldiers in the military parade The Duke also posed for a photograph with a young boy who was trying to sneakily take a picture without his father seeing.Ethan Wicks, 12, had been instructed by his father Captain Ian Wicks, who is based in Germany and was the parade commander, to keep his phone away.But when the Duke spotted Ethan trying to be subtle, he asked “would you like a proper one?” and posed for a photo.”It was weird that I didn’t ask for the photo and that he asked me,” the 12-year-old added. The Duke meets local residents who turned out in the sunshine to watch today’s festivities #NRW70 pic.twitter.com/iwdnVEld7P— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) August 23, 2016 The Duke of Cambridge greets Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor It was the first time the Duke had met Mrs Merkel. They shook hands on a red carpet to a band playing Let It Go from the film Frozen at the Tonhalle.Earlier in the day, the Duke met members of the British Forces Germany (BFG) who are stationed in the region.He watched a BFG military parade with the region’s minister, President Hannelore Kraft, who presented the federal state’s highest honour – the Fahnenband – to the Brigade. The Duke of Cambridge greets Angela Merkel, the German ChancellorCredit:PA The Duke and Chancellor Merkel meet young performers ahead of tonight’s 70th anniversary celebrations #NRW70 pic.twitter.com/KT3PxdgyFW— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) August 23, 2016center_img The Duke of Cambridge has said that the “depth” of Britain’s friendship with Germany will not change after Brexit.The Duke, who was speaking at a gala in Dusseldorf alongside Chancellor Angela Merkel to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia, said the relationship with the region and country would not weaken.”In short, what began 70 years ago as a relationship of necessity between an occupying power and a region in ruin, is today a partnership of genuine friendship and of massive mutual benefit.”This partnership will continue despite Britain’s recent decision to leave the European Union. The depth of our friendship with Germany and with North Rhine-Westphalia will not change.”The Duke, who was speaking at the Tonhalle, added: “Bilaterally and internationally we will continue together to lead efforts to promote prosperity, security and stability in the world.” The Duke of Cambridge inspects soldiers in the military paradeCredit:PA Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The Duke revealed he wished he had served in Germany to a member of the 20th Armoured Brigade.He told Andy Thorne, deputy chief of staff at the HQ of the BFG who has been stationed in Germany for 10 years, that he “wished” he had been given the opportunity to be based in the country. The Duke was visiting the German city to mark the anniversary of the making of the state which was created by the British military government in 1946 after the Second World War.”Operation Marriage” merged the regions of North Rhine, part of the largely Catholic Rhineland, and the predominantly Protestant Westphalia.A close link between Britain and the North Rhine-Westphalia state has endured since, partially thanks to the continued military presence.last_img read more

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George Michael died of accidental drugs overdose says his cousin

first_imgGeorge Michael’s cousin has said he suspects the star died of an accidental drugs overdose.Andros Georgiou said the singer had resumed taking “hard drugs” toward the end of his life, but denied his death was suicide.The 53-year-old superstar was found dead at his home in Goring-on-Thames, Oxfordshire, on Christmas Day.Police said a post-mortem had proved “inconclusive” and the results of further tests are yet to be revealed.His death is being treated as “unexplained but non-suspicious”. Speaking to the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme, Mr Georgiou said hard drugs “had been back in [Michael’s] life” and crack cocaine was a “favourite”, but he denied the singer used heroin.”I just think he took too much of something, mixed with antidepressants and other drugs he was on – with alcohol,” he said.”I think his heart just stopped beating.” The former record producer rejected speculation that Michael had taken his own life after suffering from depression.He said: “I believe he had suicidal thoughts, because his mental health was all over the place. But I don’t believe this was suicide.”Mr Georgiou worked with Michael at the height of his fame, although the pair became estranged in 1998.He paid tribute to the “incredibly generous” star who was “one of the nicest people you could ever meet”. You can watch George Michael’s cousin in his only broadcast interview exclusively on @VictoriaLIVE @vicderbyshire from 0900 on Tuesday. https://t.co/stwL1g2L3t— Louisa Compton (@louisa_compton) 16 January 2017center_img Mr Georgiou said Michael had taken steps to overcome his use of illegal drugs.However, after speaking to people who knew the singer towards the end of his life, he believed he had been “dragged back into the dark side”.Detectives from Thames Valley Police have questioned the last people to see Michael alive as part of their investigation.Mr Georgiou said he wanted to “get to the truth of what happened” and to know what the singer may have taken and how he could have acquired it. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Alex Salmond shows sympathy for rates protesters in northeast

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Alex Salmond has admitted some complaints over huge business rate rises are “legitimate”, days after a leading hotelier and close friend of the former first minister called for a nationwide boycott of swingeing increases.In the wake of a widespread outcry over a rates hike that has left some businesses facing increases of up to 400 per cent, he said there were companies that were “feeling the hard edge”  of the revaluation.His comments, in a video blog for a local newspaper, will heap further pressure on the Scottish Government to intervene.Mr Salmond was speaking after Stewart Spence, owner of the five-star Marcliffe Hotel in Aberdeen and a friend of the MP, said he would not pay the 25 per cent increase he is facing and called on other firms to join him.He told The Daily Telegraph he had since been contacted by independent hoteliers, restaurant and pub owners ready to join a non-payment campaign.Mr Spence also expressed disappointment over Nicola Sturgeon’s failure to react to the row and said he was considering leaving the SNP, which he joined around eight years ago. Hotelier Stewart Spence plans to boycott rates riseCredit:Bloomberg Stewart Spence Mr Salmond said in the video that ministers deserved credit for the “small business bonus” which exempted many companies from rates.But he added there was an argument against some of the rises, saying: “Of course people are feeling the hard edge of it, and in the north-east of Scotland there’s a very legitimate case because of the date of estimation, when independent valuation officers made their assessment, and when, because of oil, the economy was much stronger than it is now.“That’s why I welcome the Aberdeenshire Council initiative to put pounds3 million into rate relief to try and take some of the edge off the hardest cases, because in times like this we need our businesses to feel wanted, to be able to grow, to be able to survive and to be able to prosper in the future.“But don’t tell me that any rates revaluation doesn’t have an outcry because they all do – that applies in England, that applies in Scotland.”Mr Salmond said the argument should be concentrated on the cases of genuine concern where “huge increases seem to be applied following a time of economics which was quite different from the reality that we are experiencing now in the north-east of Scotland”.Ministers have been asked for help by tourism, licensed trade and hospitality groups, but Derek Mackay, the finance minister, has responded by saying rating valuations are carried out by independent assessors and funded by councils, not government.Murdo Fraser, the Scottish Conservative spokesman, said that if Mr Mackay would not listen to the firms affected, perhaps he might “listen to his former boss.”Mr Spence revealed last week that the revaluation – the first since 2010 – meant his rates were due to rise by 25 per cent, despite his business experiencing a 40 per cent drop in turnover because of the slump in the oil price.He added: “I’ve been asked to pay £315,000 as against £253,000. I’m just going to continue paying the old amount until there’s a settlement.”A spokesman for Mr Mackay said: “We agree there are some firms in the north-east who face a challenge, which is exactly why we have worked with local authorities on schemes that could support those businesses.”last_img read more

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British Museum hosts xrated hunt to find its naughtiest treasures

first_imgParthenon Marbles The Warren Cup A marble statue of a naked Aphrodite crouching at her bath also known as Lely’s Venus The Museum already allows guests to take photographs freely. With 6.4million visitors a year, it is Britain’s busiest and most popular museum or gallery.Organisers expect Love Hunt to attract adult players, and are braced for interest from hen dos.THATMuse said: “It’s fondly referred to as “the World’s Museum”. But with a collection of 8 million objects, covering 807,000 sq feet, just where does one start?!?“Join us on a treasure hunt to give you some focus, threading themes and cultures together.”The British Museum runs its own family-friendly treasure hunts, inviting children to become “explorers” with a journey of discovery around the museum. Once they succeed, they will then be offered a mix of “intellectual questions” about the subject in hand, or a more lighthearted task relating to it.Previous hunts have seen participants dared to serenade the Museum’s restaurant with a love song, winning bonus points for overcoming their embarrassment in front of an audience.Others have required guests to act out scenes in paintings.Of the Love Hunt, the invitation explains: “Throughout the evening you will caper around the museum, finding treasures, photographing them and learning about the artefacts along the way.”The treasure hunt is carried out in small groups during the Museum’s regular opening hours, with players working around members of the public seeing its sights in the usual fashion. Parthenon Marbles The British Museum is to host an x-rated “love hunt”, which will see members of the public seek out the naughtiest items in its collection.Visitors will be invited to “titter at some semi-pornographic 5th Century Greek pots” and “gawk at the enormous phallus of a Priapus” in an event aimed firmly at adults.Promising an exploration of the museum’s “naughty and amorous tales”, a specially-designed treasure hunt will see teams of visitors romp through the galleries, set “playful” tasks to take photographs in front of key exhibits.It is being organised by external company Treasure Hunt At The Museum (THATMuse) and follows similar challenges at the British Museum with different themes.Attendees are invited to “search for the impish Putti” and “vie to capture the beautiful Venus”, from June 16th onwards. The Warren Cup While not conceived or run by British Museum staff, the event follows a schools sex and relationship education programme of workshops based on the museum’s objects.Speaking during a panel event in April, director Hartwig Fischer said the workshops were an example of how museums can help to “mitigate” a perceived lack of arts in state schools.”They [museums] offer protected spaces and offer schools the possibility for pupils to engage with objects and address difficult subjects,” he said then.”We run a sex and relationship programme that works much better in museums where you have objects that you can relate to and where it is easier to talk about these things.”Official educational talks use artefacts from Japan, ancient Egypt and Greece to explore pornography and consent, and items from India, ancient Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome to discuss LGBT issues through history. The less official Love Hunt will see groups of tourists given a worksheet with clues relating to adult-themed objects and images in the museum, tasked with tracking them down. A marble statue of a naked Aphrodite crouching at her bath also known as Lely's Venus Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

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Soaring abuse of elderly amid warnings care system disintegrating

first_imgCouncils have warned Britain is facing a care crisis Last year research found nine in ten care workers have witnessed abuse in homes with pensioners tied to chairs, starved and turned into the victims of cruel pranks.The study by Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council found  widespread neglect and attacks on care home residents, with psychological games most commonly cited as the type of abuse witnessed. The anonymous survey of staff members at five new care homes found 88 per cent had witnessed or suspected abuse in nursing homes which previously employed them. A poll of more than 800 GPs found 33 per cent said they were unable to contact social services when attempting to make such referrals, with 42 per cent saying they faced unacceptable delays in action being taken.Overall, the survey found that 59 per cent said the response from social services was inadequate.Dr Robert Morley, from the British Medical Association, said the statistics reflected pressures across the country, in a system which was “rapidly disintegrating”.Dr Ayesha Sharieff, GP and safeguarding lead for her practice in South London, said her team had ‘huge problems’ getting in touch with social care.She said it was often “impossible” to get hold of social workers, who were often found to have left or be on stress-related leave. The figures show that the number of cases involving adults – usually elderly or disabled – has risen from 4,194 in 2013/14 to 5,615 in 2015/16 – an increase of 33 per cent. Meanwhile, cases involving children have also risen, with 7,906 reports in 2015/16 – an increase of four per cent in two  years. Councils have warned Britain is facing a care crisis Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director at Age UK said the findings were “truly frightening”.“You would expect any referral to social services from a GP to be seen as a top priority,” she said. “The fact that approaching two thirds of GPs are reporting the response back was inadequate tells you all you need to know about the enormous pressures on our underfunded social care system.”Earlier this week council chiefs said cuts to social care will continue this year despite ministers putting in an extra £1bn to meet extra pressures this year. Local authorities in England intend to make £824m of savings in their social care budgets, a survey of social services leaders found. Truly these are frightening findingsCaroline Abrahams, Charity Director at Age UK Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Reports of abuse and neglect of the elderly have risen by one third, amid warnings from GPs that the care system is “rapidly disintegrating”.The number of cases referred to social services under safeguarding rules has soared, new figures show, with more than 5,600 referrals last year – an increase of 33 per cent in two years.GPs said they were unable to secure help for the vulnerable after reporting concerns, with almost 60 per cent saying they had received an inadequate response from social services.Charities last night said the figures were “frightening” with thousands of pensioners in care homes and their own homes being left to be abused, even though concerns had been raised.The statistics, revealed under Freedom of Information disclosures, are part of an investigation by Pulse magazine, which found widespread concerns among GPs.Safeguarding concerns are lodged with social services or police when it is feared that a vulnerable person is being targeted for abuse or neglect.last_img read more

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