PASADENA STAKES QUOTES-SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 2020

first_imgJOCKEY QUOTESUMBERTO RISPOLI, HARIBOUX, WINNER: “I watched film of this horse before I rode him the last time (a second place finish in the Eddie Logan Stakes Dec. 29).  You could see that if you put him in the race early, he will pull quite a bit.  We decided he needs to be taken off the pace and it’s best for him. Today, I was one hundred percent sure there was enough speed in the race, so Jeff said, ‘Okay, take him back.’  We were able to save ground and coming around the last turn, a gap was open, so why go around?”   TRAINER QUOTESJEFF MULLINS, HARIBOUX, WINNER: “Umberto’s done a great job with him.  He’s a very studious guy and he’s a strong finisher. He’s been able to take him back, drop the reins and gets him to relax very well.  He showed a nice turn of foot today and he’s looking like he’s going to be a really nice horse.“(Hariboux) is just an honest hard trying little horse and he gives it to you every time.”MARK COHEN, RED BARON’S BARN, HARIBOUX, WINNER: “It looked like we were three to five around the far turn and luckily he got the job done.”NOTES: The winning owners are Red Baron’s Barn LLC or Rancho Temescal LLC.last_img read more

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N Korea Detained Lynnwood man smuggled in propaganda

first_imgSEOUL, South Korea — North Korea delivered its most in-depth account yet of the case against a Korean-American sentenced to 15 years’ hard labor, accusing him late Thursday of smuggling in inflammatory literature and trying to establish a base for anti-Pyongyang activities at a border city hotel.Still, the long list of allegations included no statement from Kenneth Bae, other than claims that he confessed and didn’t want an attorney present during his sentencing last week for what Pyongyang called hostile acts against the state.Since the sentencing came during a period of tentative diplomatic moves following weeks of high tension and North Korean threats of nuclear and missile strikes on Washington and Seoul, outside analysts have said Pyongyang may be using Bae, 44, of Lynnwood near Seattle, as bait to win diplomatic concessions in the standoff over its nuclear weapons program. North Korea repeated its denial of such speculation in the new statement, but the pattern has occurred repeatedly.The North’s state media described the statement from an unidentified Supreme Court spokesman as a response to U.S. government and media assertions that the legal case against Bae was unreasonable and other claims “that he was not tried in a transparent manner and (the North) was trying to use this issue as a political bargaining chip.” The spokesman said Bae, 44, could’ve faced death but the court reduced the penalty because he confessed. He was arrested in North Korea in November.Bae, a Washington state resident described by friends as a devout Christian and a tour operator, is at least the sixth American detained in North Korea since 2009. The others eventually were deported or released without serving out their terms, some after trips to Pyongyang by prominent Americans, including former presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter. There has been no sign yet of a high-profile American envoy set to make a clemency mission to North Korea, which has only recently eased a near-daily, weekslong torrent of threats that followed greater U.N. sanctions over Pyongyang’s February nuclear test.The North’s statement said Bae gave anti-Pyongyang lectures in China and “infiltrated” about 250 students into the city of Rason, a special economic zone in North Korea’s far northeastern region bordering China and Russia. It didn’t elaborate on the students’ activities, however.last_img read more

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US House proposes budget increases for energy environmental research programs

first_imgThe bills released today provide only top-line numbers. Additional details will become available after the full appropriations panel votes on the bills. That process will begin on Wednesday when appropriations subcommittees are scheduled to approve the energy and interior appropriations bills. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The House bills will require reconciliation with versions produced by the Senate, which has yet to release its proposed spending levels. And it is not clear whether Congress and the White House will be able to agree on spending plans before the 2020 fiscal year begins this fall. If no agreement is reached, current spending levels could be extended into the new fiscal year—or, in case of an impasse, the government could shut down. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Key research programs at the energy and interior departments would get budget increases—not deep cuts proposed by President Donald Trump—under proposed 2020 appropriations bills released today by spending panels of the U.S. House of Representatives.The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would also see a hefty increase in its science budget for the 2020 fiscal year, which begins on 1 October, under plans released by the Democratic-controlled House Committee on Appropriations.Highlights of the proposed budgets include:center_img The science office at the Department of Energy (DOE) would see an increase of 4.3%, or $285 million, bringing it to $6.87 billion. In contrast, Trump had requested a cut of 16.5%, or $1.1 billion. DOE’s energy efficiency and renewable energy programs would get a boost of 11.4%, or $273 million, to $2.65 billion. The administration had requested a cut of 86%, or $2 billion. The Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) would receive an increase of 16.1%, or $59 million, to $425 million. Trump had proposed eliminating ARPA-E. Overall, DOE’s budget would grow to $37.1 billion under the House proposal. That is $1.4 billion above its current budget, and $5.6 billion more than the president’s budget request. The U.S. Geological Survey, part of the Department of the Interior, would get an increase of 6.5%, or $75 million, to $1.24 billion. The administration had requested a cut of 15.2%, or $177 million. Core science and environmental programs at EPA would receive $3.41 billion, an increase of $105 million above current levels and $1 billion above the president’s request. By David MalakoffMay. 14, 2019 , 4:40 PM U.S. House proposes budget increases for energy, environmental research programs Emaillast_img read more

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