Don’t deny costumed teens trick-or-treat

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Re Oct. 29 article, “Should teenagers go trick-or-treating? Should you give them candy?”: I read the teen’s trick-or-treating article. As a senior in high school, I will say it should be acceptable for teens to trick-or-treat.Wearing a costume comes with trick-or-treating. Therefore, if not in costume, adults should be able to deny teens candy. Also, I will add that teens should be respectful as well when approaching someone’s house.With all of this taken into consideration, if teens are in costume and are being respectful, don’t deny us our right to feel like a kid again.Samantha BarnesDelansonMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady County warns of possible COVID-19 exposure at Schenectady restaurant, Rotterdam barEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesLocal movie theater operators react to green lightEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

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Vladimir Putin may be in real trouble

first_imgThe message must be that there is no alternative. That is particularly true at a time when the regime is failing to deliver the rising living standards it once offered Russians in exchange for their passivity.After two years of recession brought on by falling oil prices and Western sanctions, the economy will grow this year by less than 2 percent.Putin now seeks popular favor with nationalist adventurism, such as the invasion of Ukraine; the election is scheduled for the anniversary of the Crimea annexation.But that, too, may be reaching a dead end; Putin’s attempts to broker favorable settlements to interventions in eastern Ukraine and Syria have been floundering. In short, it may be that Putin has more reason to fear Navalny than the poll numbers suggest.Even as he outlaws political competition in Russia, Putin continues to oversee attempts to undermine and tilt elections in the West. For him, democratic contests are a vulnerability, to be avoided at home and exploited abroad.In that sense, Western governments and Russia’s democrats have a common cause in countering Putin. What both lack is an effective strategy.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? Categories: Editorial, OpinionThe following editorial appeared in The Washington Post:Vladimir Putin boasts of popularity ratings that Western leaders, Donald Trump included, can only dream of — 85 percent and above since Russia’s invasion and annexation of Crimea in 2014.Yet Putin remains unwilling to test those numbers against real competition. On Monday, the state election commission banned his most popular opponent, Alexei Navalny, from running in the presidential election scheduled for March 18 — meaning that Putin will face no serious opposition to obtaining another six-year term.Navalny, who has attracted a broad following across Russia by campaigning against corruption, was proscribed on the basis of trumped-up fraud charges that the European Court of Human Rights ruled invalid.His real offenses were helping to lead opposition to Putin’s last re-election, in 2012; producing videos documenting Kremlin criminality, such as the more than $1 billion in property amassed by Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev; and bringing out tens of thousands of followers in cities across Russia this year to denounce the regime.The conventional political wisdom in Moscow holds that Putin could easily best Navalny in the presidential election, bolstering both his international and domestic credibility. He nevertheless prefers to stage a Potemkin vote in which his only challengers will be two perennial candidates, one Communist and one ultra- nationalist, and Ksenia Sobchak, a 36-year-old celebrity who has called the election “a high-budget show.”What could explain Putin’s seemingly self-defeating tactics?Some analysts argue that the authoritarian regime he has constructed requires not a credible democratic victory but a crushing show of strength.last_img read more

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In Oregon, progressivism spills over at the pump

first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionWASHINGTON — Frank Lloyd Wright purportedly said, “Tip the world over on its side and everything loose will land in Los Angeles.”Today, however, Oregon is the state with the strangest state of mind, which has something to do with it being impeccably progressive.In the series “Portlandia,” the mention of artisanal lightbulbs might be satirical, but given today’s gas-pumping controversy, perhaps not.On Jan. 1, by the grace of God — or of the government, which is pretty much the same thing to progressives — a sliver of a right was granted to Oregonians. Henceforth, they can pump gas into their cars and trucks, all by themselves.But only in counties with populations of less than 40,000, evidently because this walk on the wild side is deemed to be prudent only in the hinterlands, where there is a scarcity of qualified technicians trained in the science of pumping.Still, 2018 will be the year of living dangerously in the state that was settled by people who trekked there on the Oregon Trail, through the territory of Native Americans hostile to Manifest Destiny. Oregon is one of two states that ban self-service filling stations. The other is almost-as-deep-blue New Jersey.There the ban is straightforward, no-damned-nonsense-about-anything-else protectionism: The point is to spare full-service gas stations from competing with self-service stations that, having lower labor costs, have lower prices. Oregon’s Legislature offers 17 reasons “it is in the public interest to maintain a prohibition on the self-service dispensing of Class 1 flammable liquids” — aka, gasoline, which you put in your car’s “Class 1 flammable liquids tank.”The first reason is: The dispensing of such liquids “by dispensers properly trained in appropriate safety procedures reduces fire hazards.” These days, civic discourse is not for shrinking violets.To be fair, when Oregonians flinch from a rendezvous with an unattended gas pump, progressive government has done its duty, as it understands this.It wants the governed to become used to having things done for them, as by “trained and certified” gas pumpers.Progressives are proud believers in providing experts — usually themselves — to help the rest of us cope with life.The only downside is that, as Alexis de Tocqueville anticipated, such government, by being the “shepherd” of the governed, can “take away from them entirely the trouble of thinking” and keep them “fixed irrevocably in childhood.”George Will is a nationally syndicated columnist with The Washington Post who writes from a conservative perspective.  More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidation This presumably refers to the many conflagrations regularly occurring at filling stations throughout the 48 states where 96 percent of Americans live lives jeopardized by state legislators who are negligent regarding their nanny-state duty to assume that their constituents are imbeciles.Among Oregon’s 16 other reasons are: Service-station cashiers are often unable to “give undivided attention” to the rank amateurs dispensing flammable liquids.When purchasers of such liquids leave their vehicles they risk “crime,” and “personal injury” from slick surfaces. (“Oregon’s weather is uniquely adverse”; i.e., it rains there.) “Exposure to toxic fumes.”Senior citizens or persons with disabilities might have to pay a higher cost at a full-service pump, which would be discriminatory.When people pump gas without the help of “trained and certified” specialists, no specialists peer under the hood to administer prophylactic maintenance, thereby “endangering both the customer and other motorists and resulting in unnecessary and costly repairs.”Self-service “has contributed to diminishing the availability of automotive repair facilities at gasoline stations” without providing — note the adjective — “sustained” reduction in gas prices.Self-service causes unemployment. And “small children left unattended” by novice gas pumpers “creates a dangerous situation.” So there.  Oregon’s Solomonic decision — freedom to pump in rural counties; everywhere else, unthinkable — terrified some Oregonians.“No! Disabled, seniors, people with young children in the car need help. Not to mention getting out of your car with transients around and not feeling safe too. This is a very bad idea.”“Not a good idea, there are lots of reason to have an attendant helping, one is they need a job too.”“Many people are not capable of knowing how to pump gas and the hazards of not doing it correctly. Besides I don’t want to go to work smelling of gas.” The complainers drew complaints: “You put the gas in your car not shower in it, princess.”“If your only marketable job skill is being able to pump gas, by god, move to Oregon and you will have reached the promised land.” “Pumped my own gas my whole life and now my hands have literally melted down to my wrists. I’m typing this with my tongue.”last_img read more

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Gilboa Dam rehab could be problematic

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion In the 1960s, Schoharie was hit with a severe drought, the Gilboa Reservoir didn’t spill for 18 months, the hypoliminion became polluted, flow at Prattsville dropped to 4.6 ft3/sec., and New York City for the first and only time opened construction tubes at the base of Gilboa Dam and dumped the polluted water into Schoharie Creek.Now that New York City is rehabbing the Gilboa Dam, it plans to guarantee a minimum release into the Schoharie Creek. This may be possible during normal times, but I suspect New York City will not release water in case of a drought. This will put the Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped storage facility in danger of not being fully functional. There will be too little water from inflow to make up for evaporation and seepage losses. When it’s hot and windy, the exposed mud flats that are periodically flooded and submerged during pump/generation will be ideally suited at pumping water into the air. This will be driven by the temperature of the mud, humidity, air temperature and wind speed.Any attempt to limit evaporation losses will involve putting a barrier between the mud and the air above.Richard Moody Jr.Schoharie,More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

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Providing the answers for east Manchester

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London deal flurry makes 2000 a record-breaking year

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Ahouvi moves for £96m Mitre House

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Pollen tells GPE to buzz off

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Investment & statistics: Holborn holds its own

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Great Portland lines up a second sniff of the Pollen Estate

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