Jeri-Rigg EYE loop anchor point strap offers a versatile attachment system » Gadget Flow

first_img– Advertisement – The Jeri-Rigg EYE loop anchor point strap solves all your transportation and storage needs. Incredibly strong, the EYE creates an anchor point where there isn’t one. This lets you easily tie down your gear on your vehicle while you travel without risking losing it. Simple to use, this nonslip loop anchor point strap offers a safe, secure attachment solution. Whether you’re using it to carry supplies on your construction truck or to transport your motorcycle, this tool-free strap keeps everything safe. Available in four size options, choose the Small Short Eye, Small Medium Eye, Medium Eye, or Large Long Eye. While the first option has a working load of 1,100 pounds and a breaking strength of 3,300 pounds, the largest option has a working load of 3,000 pounds. Amazingly, it’s breaking strength is 9,000 pounds! So this setup can definitely hold what you need.last_img read more

Read More →

Housing stocks see split reaction on coronavirus vaccine news

first_img– Advertisement – All this, however, looks like good news for the big apartment REITs, like Equity Residential, Avalonbay, and UDR. Apartments not only benefit when the cost of housing goes up, but there is clearly a feeling that a vaccine will get people back to work, back to the nation’s downtowns and turn urban flight around.“Clearly there is enthusiasm, but it doesn’t take away from the fact that rents are down over 20% in many of the major urban gateway markets, with companies still letting employees work from home into middle of 2021,” said Alexander Goldfarb, a REIT analyst with Piper Sandler. “There is a lot more earnings pressure to come.”Goldfarb is also concerned that there are other social and economic ramifications that could keep people from rushing back to the urban core, especially on the coasts, where Covid restrictions have been tighter and local economies have suffered more. Homebuilder stocks are taking a hit, while apartment REITs are finally crawling out of the basement amid a massive market rally sparked by Pfizer’s announcement Monday that early trial data show its coronavirus vaccine to be highly effective.As investors digest the news, suddenly the pandemic housing picture looks a little different.The nation’s homebuilders have been benefiting from the stay-at-home culture of Covid, as people looked for larger, more high-tech homes in the suburbs. Working and schooling from home had been top of mind, but an effective vaccine could reverse that.- Advertisement – Stocks of the biggest builders like DR Horton, Lennar, Pulte and luxury builder Toll Brothers, were down at midday Monday. The iShares U.S. Homebuilding ETF, which includes home improvement retailers like Home Depot, Sherwin Williams and Masco, was also taking a hit.Part of that also has to do with mortgage rates, which set yet another record low last week but appeared to be turning around Monday with a sell-off in the bond market. Mortgage rates follow loosely the yield on the 10-year U.S. Treasury, which surged to the highest level since March.“Bond weakness is starting to snowball in a way we haven’t seen since the crazy volatility in March, and this time around there are no concerns about liquidity and smooth market functioning,” said Matthew Graham, chief operating officer at Mortgage News Daily. “That makes the current move very serious.”- Advertisement –center_img Rick Nazarro of Colonial Manor Realty talks with a pair of interested buyers in the driveway as a couple waits to enter a property he is trying to sell during a “controlled” open house on May 2, 2020 in Revere, MA.Blake Nissen | Boston Globe | Getty Images – Advertisement –last_img read more

Read More →

Hints on Obamacare’s Future – The New York Times

first_imgIs there anything you think we’re missing? Anything you want to see more of? We’d love to hear from you. Email us at [email protected] Not all of Fox’s anchors are ready to move on. Tucker Carlson and Sean Hannity have criticized some of their colleagues on-air for pushing back against the Trump team’s falsehoods. But the Murdoch empire appears more or less prepared to confront a new day, with Biden in the White House.As one longtime Murdoch lieutenant told Michael, “They don’t tend to back losers.” – Advertisement – In his efforts to paint the election as illegitimate, Trump may have thought he could count on Rupert Murdoch. After all, more than arguably any other force in American politics, Murdoch’s media empire served to seed the ground for Trump’s brand of reality-denying, screen-savvy political domination — and then defended his narratives once he reached the Oval Office.But in the past week, as our media correspondent Michael M. Grynbaum reports, Murdoch’s publications — from Fox News to The New York Post to The Wall Street Journal — have broadly refused to take the bait as the president pushes a series of vague, nonspecific arguments about election fraud and mismanagement.Fox has refused, despite the Trump campaign’s calls to Murdoch himself in England, to retract its call of Arizona for Biden. The Post emblazoned its front page on Sunday with the words “IT’S JOE TIME,” accompanied by an image of Biden posing and beaming. And The Journal’s editorial page has been gently urging Trump to gracefully accept defeat. On Politics is also available as a newsletter. Sign up here to get it delivered to your inbox.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement – Biden putting on a mask after delivering remarks on the Affordable Care Act in Wilmington, Del.As Trump fights the election result, has Murdoch moved on?- Advertisement – As Trump hangs on, his conservative allies mostly stick by his side — except for Rupert Murdoch. It’s Wednesday, and this is your politics tip sheet. Sign up here to get On Politics in your inbox every weekday.last_img read more

Read More →

Prince William Jokes About Getting ‘Back Into Shape’ Amid Quarantine

first_imgTime to work on his fitness! Prince William recognized that he let himself go a bit while quarantining amid the coronavirus pandemic.To honor Remembrance Day, the Duke of Cambridge, 38, spoke to deployed members of the Royal Navy, the Army and the Royal Air Force in a video call. While discussing the occasion, William was able to find humor in his own experience in lockdown.- Advertisement – Earlier in the pandemic, William and his wife, Duchess Kate, had to deal with their eldest children, Prince George, 7, and Princess Charlotte, 5, learning from home as their school, St Thomas’ Battersea, closed its doors for safety reasons. (The couple, who have been married since 2011, also share 2-year-old son Prince Louis.)“Being educated from home is a shock to the system for [them],” a source told Us in April. “To begin with, they were easily distracted and wanted to play together instead of sitting at a computer, but Kate’s now got them into a routine. … [She] is mainly in charge of the home schooling and playtimes, but William is also very involved too.”Listen to Us Weekly’s Hot Hollywood as each week the editors of Us break down the hottest entertainment news stories! In June, the prince teased that he was “worried about the waistline of the nation” as the U.K. continued to quarantine amid the global health crisis. “I’ve done a lot of baking at home. Chocolate goes down very well,” he explained while making his first public outing since mid-March at the ambulance base at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Norfolk, England.Prince William Jokes About Needing Get Back Shape Amid QuarantinePrince William. ShutterstockWilliam quietly battled COVID-19 in April after his father, Prince Charles, fought off the virus in late March. A source told Us Weekly that the father of three, whose diagnosis wasn’t revealed until early November, had “rough moments” as he even struggled to breathe. He was treated by palace doctors and quarantined inside his Norfolk home.“William insisted on keeping this low-key,” the insider said. “Only a handful of family members, senior royal staff and close friends knew about it at the time.”- Advertisement – – Advertisement – The future king, who served as a pilot with the Royal Air Force Search and Rescue Force, was reminded about how he participated in a drug bust in 2008 that exceeded $50 million while aboard the HMS Iron Duke in the Caribbean.Prince William Jokes About Needing Get Back Shape Amid QuarantinePrince William. Shutterstock“Only half of what you got on Iron Duke, but still nonetheless very good,” leading physical instructor Damon Bell told the royal, to which William responded by joking, “I wasn’t going to bring that up, but I’m glad that’s still being talked about.”William then joked about needing Bell’s fitness expertise to help get him back on track. “I remember being beasted by people like you, Damon, on the Iron Duke. The on-deck PT was always quite a fun afternoon,” he explained. “I think after a number of lockdowns, I might need your PT skills to help get back into shape again.”- Advertisement –last_img read more

Read More →

Biden set to erase 4 years of Trump’s abysmal civil rights record at the Justice Department

first_img– Advertisement – “This will be an even bigger pivot because of what the Trump administration represents,” said Vanita Gupta, who led the division under Obama and now heads up the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights. “It’s been a kind of systematic erosion of civil rights enforcement that is unlike anything we’ve seen in recent times or recent administrations.”The Trump-era Justice Department marked an outright betrayal of the original mission of the division, which originated in 1957 as part of the Civil Rights Act with the specific intention of enforcing laws that newly prohibited bias on the basis of race, color, sex, disability, religion, and national origin. But under the disgraceful leadership of Trump’s attorneys general, the division has been wielded as a weapon targeting disadvantaged minorities. The Justice Department sued to protect white students from alleged discrimination in admissions; it all but abandoned protecting the voting rights of minorities; it took aim at sanctuary cities that bar local law enforcement officials from coordinating with federal immigration agents. And it ultimately found itself on the wrong side of a historic Supreme Court ruling that found the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects gay and transgender workers from discrimination.- Advertisement – In other words, the Trump-era Civil Rights Division systematically worked to further the oppression of already marginalized groups. Those injustices and more are about to come to a screeching halt as the Biden administration works to swiftly “undo the Trump years,” according to Linda Chavez, who served as the White House director of public liaison for former President Ronald Reagan.Good riddance. Don’t let the door hit you on the way out, Bill Barr and Donald Trump. – Advertisement –last_img read more

Read More →

Three more cases of avian flu reported in Vietnam

first_imgJan 24, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Three more confirmed human cases of H5N1 avian influenza—two of them fatal—have been reported in Vietnam since Jan 21.The latest cases, which involved a teenager and a man and woman in their 30s, bring the number of confirmed fatal cases in Vietnam since late December to nine, according to media reports.A 35-year-old woman from the southern province of Dong Thap died of avian flu in a Ho Chi Minh City hospital Jan 21, according to a Jan 22 Associated Press (AP) report. She fell ill a week after slaughtering a duck, but family members who ate the duck did not become ill, the report said.Tests also confirmed avian flu in a 17-year-old boy from the southern province of Bac Lieu who died Jan 15, according to the AP report and an Agence France-Presse report. A local health official said the boy had slaughtered a chicken before he became sick.Today, the Chinese news agency Xinhua reported that a 36-year-old man from Thai Binh province in northern Vietnam has tested positive for avian flu and is in stable condition in a Hanoi hospital. He is the brother of two men in their 40s whose cases were reported last week.One of the two older brothers, identified by Xinhua as Nguyen Huu Viet, 47, died Jan 9. The other is 42-year-old Nguyen Thanh Hung, who also was in stable condition in Hanoi, according to Xinhua. The 42-year-old reportedly had spent some time caring for his older brother during the latter’s illness.All three brothers had shared a dish containing raw duck blood, according to Xinhua and other media reports. The World Health Organization said last week that the brothers might have acquired the virus from that meal but that Vietnamese officials also were looking into the possibility of person-to-person transmission among them.The state-controlled Vietnam News Agency (VNA) reported today that the 36-year-old brother, whom it identified as Nguyen Huu Hung, has recovered and is preparing to leave the hospital. The said he “had been diagnosed early and given the right treatment,” but it didn’t describe the treatment.last_img read more

Read More →

WHO urges careful investigation of H5N1 cases

first_imgEditor’s Note: Shortly after publication of this article, the guidelines referred to were removed from the WHO Web site pending further peer review. A revised version was published in January 2007, with changes in the sections on considerations for launching an investigation, contact tracing, monitoring of healthcare workers, and technical references. A link to the revision appears at the end of this article.Nov 29, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) this week released guidelines for investigating human cases of H5N1 avian influenza in an effort to shed more light on the mysterious virus and improve the chances of detecting changes that could turn it into a pandemic strain.The 14-page document calls for a thorough probe of each case, from interviewing the patient and searching for contacts through hunting for other cases nearby and sifting data for any signs of human-to-human transmission. It calls for investigating suspected cases before laboratory test results are available.The new guidance comes less than a month after the WHO issued a report on how much remains unknown about the H5N1 virus. Written by a group of leading flu experts, that report, issued Nov 2, said H5N1 illness is fundamentally different from ordinary flu in its severity and range of manifestations. Among other things, the panel called for research to determine why children and young adults seem especially susceptible and whether genetic factors increase the risk of infection or transmission among blood relatives.The introduction to the new guidance says, “The document reflects and incorporates the practical field experience gained by investigators working at international, national, and sub-national levels during investigations of A(H5N1).”The intention is that local health agencies will use the guidelines to build their own investigative plans and procedures, the WHO says.The purposes of case investigation, according to the guidelines, include:Confirming the diagnosis of H5N1Reducing illness and death by rapidly identifying cases and starting appropriate treatment and precautionsReducing further spread by identifying possible sources of exposure and implementing prevention and control measuresDetermining if human-to-human transmission is becoming more efficientIdentifying the key epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic characteristics of each caseEnsuring timely exchange of information among clinicians, health investigators, and government officials to facilitate appropriate responsesIn advice on searching for patients’ contacts, the WHO says investigators should assume that patients are infectious for 1 week before onset of illness and 2 weeks afterward, even though the infectious period for the virus has not been determined. Healthy contacts should be monitored and given preventive antiviral treatment, depending on their risk of exposure, as defined in other WHO guidance.Besides tracing contacts, investigators should search actively for other possible H5N1 cases by going from house to house and possibly conducting telephone surveys of healthcare facilities, practitioners, and labs, the WHO advises.The agency recommends against using rapid diagnostic tests for the H5N1 virus. “The diagnostic accuracy of commercially available rapid tests is unknown, and if the test result is positive, differentiation between influenza A subtypes is not possible and confirmatory tests must be done,” the document says.In its Nov 2 report, the WHO said a rapid, reliable diagnostic test for H5N1 infection was urgently needed.The guidance document discusses potential clues to a change in the virus’s human transmissibility and what to look for in evaluating clusters of cases. It also suggests doing complementary studies, such as seroprevalence surveys of people with possible occupational risk in affected areas and case-control studies to evaluate risk factors for infection.See also:WHO guidelines for investigation of human cases of avian influenza A(H5N1) (January 2007 revision)http://www.who.int/csr/resources/publications/influenza/WHO_CDS_EPR_GIP_2006_4r1.pdfNov 2, 2006, CIDRAP News story “WHO report calls H5N1 vaccine stockpiling premature”last_img read more

Read More →

WHO warns against steroids for H5N1 patients

first_imgApr 20, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – In the wake of a clinical conference, the World Health Organization (WHO) has modified its recommendations on treatment for patients with H5N1 avian influenza by strengthening a warning against corticosteroids and suggesting the option of using higher doses of oseltamivir in some cases, among other advice.The meeting, held in Antalya, Turkey, Mar 19 to 21, brought together clinicians, virologists, epidemiologists, and others to share their observations and unpublished data on treatment of H5N1 patients, the WHO said in a statement yesterday.Since the last clinical conference of its kind was held in Hanoi in May 2005, eight more countries have reported human H5N1 infections, the WHO said. The current WHO global avian flu count is 291 cases with 172 deaths in 12 countries, from Indonesia to Egypt and Nigeria. The disease is fatal in humans about 60% of the time.In previous treatment advice in May 2006, the WHO warned against routine use of corticosteroids except in the context of randomized trials. In its new statement, the agency said corticosteroids have not been effective, “and prolonged or high-dose corticosteroids can result in serious adverse effects in H5N1 patients, including opportunistic infections. Corticosteroids should not be used routinely, except for persistent septic shock with suspected adrenal insufficiency.”In line with the meeting discussions, the WHO offered these additional conclusions about treating H5N1 patients:Early treatment with oseltamivir (Tamiflu), recommended as the first-line medication for H5N1 infections, is useful for reducing mortality, and treatment is warranted even when the drug is started late, because evidence suggests prolonged virus replication.Modified regimens of oseltamivir treatment, including two-fold higher dosage, longer duration, and possibly combination therapy with amantadine (in countries where the H5N1 virus is susceptible to the drug), “may be considered on a case-by-case basis,” especially in patients who have pneumonia or worsening disease.Antibiotic prophylaxis should not be used. However, antibiotics are appropriate for the initial treatment of patients who have pneumonia, using evidence-based guidelines for treating community-acquired pneumonia. When possible, microbiologic studies should guide antibiotic use in H5N1 patients.Therapy for H5N1-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) should follow evidence-based guidelines for treating sepsis-associated ARDS and should involve mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume.The advance release of WHO’s updated clinical guidance comes as researchers from Southeast Asia and the United States are launching a study to determine if doubling the standard dose of oseltamivir will improve its effectiveness against H5N1 influenza or severe seasonal flu. As reported previously, the researchers, part of the Southeast Asia Influenza Clinical Research Network, hope to enroll 400 patients in the study over the next 2 years.The WHO first mentioned combining oseltamivir with amantadine therapy in its last treatment guideline update in May 2006. It said clinicians should use oseltamivir as first-line treatment but should consider adding one of the older antiviral drugs, amantadine or rimantadine, to the regimen if surveillance suggests local H5N1 strains are susceptible to them.That recommendation was based on data showing that some strains of H5N1, mostly those from China and Indonesia, were susceptible to the older drugs.In its statement yesterday, the WHO urged clinicians who modify current antiviral drug regimens to keep detailed records on the treatment and response.A more detailed report from the meeting will be published later in a scientific journal as updated WHO recommendations on H5N1 clinical management, the WHO said.See also:Apr 19 WHO summaryMar 29 CIDRAP News article “International network to study high-dose Tamiflu”May 22, 2006, CIDRAP News article “WHO sees role for older antivirals in some H5N1 cases”last_img read more

Read More →

Face up to socioeconomic toll of H5N1, experts urge

first_imgMar 18, 2008 – ATLANTA (CIDRAP News) – More than 10 years after the first appearance of avian influenza H5N1, it is time to acknowledge that the virus has become entrenched in many areas and to begin grappling with its social and economic effects, leading researchers said at a scientific meeting.Speaking at the biennial International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases, senior animal-health scientists urged their human-health colleagues to focus on the many non-science issues—from agricultural traditions to food needs to gender relations—that are complicating avian flu control.H5N1’s potential for causing a human pandemic has understandably been the major focus of research, the scientists acknowledged. But “for every human being infected, there is at least 1 million animals infected—and that is probably an underestimate,” Dr. Ilaria Capua, the head of virology at Italy’s Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, said Tuesday morning. “The veterinary community . . . have never before faced a challenge this big.”Most of those animals are in the developing world, and the majority are owned by small farmers and households. So the basic outbreak-control measures of culling infected birds and closing live-bird markets pose immediate threats to the income and nutrition of individual families.”This disease represents a food security issue,” Capua said. “It is destroying the livelihood of rural communities.”Control programs have bumped up against an array of unforeseen difficulties. In Southeast Asia, Capua said, experts hoping to train farmers in biosecurity have been frustrated by loyalty to traditional practices that confine different species such as chickens, ducks, and pigs in the same space.In Africa, said Dr. Alejandro Thiermann, special advisor to the director-general of the World Organization for Animal Health, programs that offer compensation to farmers who surrender birds for slaughter have been tripped up by ignorance of family economics. Villagers who raise and sell chickens tend to be women, he said—and they have held their birds out from surrender programs because compensation is paid to the heads of households, who are men.The economic repercussions reach from the micro level of village markets to the macro level of national economies and back, Thiermann said. Fearing the importation of H5N1 flu, some countries have banned imports of chicken produced in affected countries, even when the disease has been found in wild birds rather than poultry. The resulting collapse in trade within a country depresses the prices that small-scale growers earn and makes them less willing to report disease outbreaks.The problem has proved so significant that new provisions governing avian flu-related trade restrictions are being added to the Animal Terrestrial Code, an international treaty governing veterinary health, said Thiermann, who serves as the Code’s secretary.The adoption of widespread poultry vaccination, one of the chief tools for controlling avian flu, also illustrates the complexity of integrating flu control into cultures and economies, said Dr. Les Sims of Australia’s Asia-Pacific Veterinary Information Services.Stringent vaccination has successfully controlled avian flu in Hong Kong since late 2003, Sims said—but Hong Kong is “small and rich” and its results have not been replicated in any other country where avian flu is endemic.China, which at any one time houses 600 million ducks and more than 4 billion chickens, has intermittently suppressed disease in its birds but may not be monitoring outbreaks closely, he said. Indonesia, the country with the most human deaths, has faced significant problems delivering the vaccine to far-flung islands and negotiating the relationships with powerful provincial authorities who may not support vaccination as strongly as the national government does.Even Vietnam, which in 2005 and 2006 had significant success controlling avian flu through vaccination and restrictions on bird raising and movement, experienced fresh outbreaks in 2007 and this year.”We knew that mass vaccination would be very difficult to sustain, both the financial cost to the government and the enthusiasm of the people to go out and support it,” Sims said. “The problems that are occurring in Vietnam now are largely ones that appear to be due to farmers not having their birds vaccinated rather than to vaccine failure.”Successful avian flu control will require attention to these and other “last-mile” difficulties that are not usually the province of virologists or human-health planners, the scientists cautioned.”Let us put ourselves in the real world and try to find solutions that are applicable and sustainable,” Capua said.last_img read more

Read More →