Keeping Samoan-qualified players for Samoa

first_imgQualification game: Nathan Hughes can play for Fiji, Samoa, New Zealand and after a few years, England There are a lot of intangible aspects to Richie McCaw’s greatness. He exudes an aura that compels teammates to dig deeper than they ever believed possible. You only need to look at the All Blacks’ last outing – an incredible heist from 19-0 down in Dublin – for that to hit home.The numbers are staggering too, and underpin the success of a 13-year international career that has a few furlongs to run. There have been 110 wins from 124 matches including just three losses from 49 clashes with Six Nations sides. One Webb Ellis trophy crowns a gleaming mountain of silverware. But dwell on this for a second: the magnificent openside has never faced Samoa.Getting stuck in: Richie McCaw in the thick of the actionOf course this is not his fault – an injured rib ruled him out of the last meeting, a one-off at New Plymouth in 2008 – but neither is it an innocent quirk of New Zealand’s fixture list. Since 1924 when the Western Samoan Rugby Football Union was formed, there have been just five full Tests between the countries.Others do not exactly possess a rich history of competition against Samoa. Boosted by World Cup fixtures, Scotland and Wales lead the way with nine encounters each. South Africa have had eight, England six with another to come at Twickenham in November.Before Richie Gray, Ross Rennie and co. won 17-16 at Apia in June 2012, the last ‘Tier One’ outfit to travel to Samoa was Ireland in 2003 – 11 long years ago. That is a sad state of affairs, forged out of an odd situation where burgeoning, brilliant talent has comfortably surpassed infrastructure.The recent words of Bundee Aki, the muscular Chiefs centre who will join Connacht after the current Super 15 campaign, spoke volumes for the predicament of Pacific Islanders.“Hopefully when the time is right and if I’m playing good footy, I can play for the Ireland international team,” he told Fairfax News in an interview that was probably too honest.“If I play three years over there and it doesn’t go well, I can always go back to Samoa.“They are a good international team as well but I’m just trying to look after my family and myself. It’s a long commitment. I put a lot of thought into it, looking at my options in terms of international rugby. Having signed for Wasps and Bristol respectively, Leuia and Lam will become household names in England before Christmas. But this is not merely about wanting to see these superb players more. It is about giving a passionate rugby country something to rally behind more regularly.Keep your eyes on future editions of Rugby World Magazine to read about our recent visit to Samoa to assess the state of rugby in the Pacific nation. Follow this link to subscribe. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img “Obviously the All Blacks have got their midfielders and with Sonny [Bill Williams] coming back, it’s a not a bad thing for me to go.”Winner: Bundee Aki in 2013Auckland-born Aki may feel little allegiance to the blue shirt, but his explicit ranking of Samoa behind Ireland and New Zealand in order of preference highlighted the allure of a move abroad in pursuit of financial stability and – when the ludicrously short three-year residency period is fulfilled – Test rugby for an adopted nation.Nathan Hughes, the exciting Wasps No. 8 and Aviva Premeirship flavour of the month, qualifies for both Fiji and Samoa. However, they are fall-backs. Having already served a residency period in New Zealand and given up hope of usurping Kieran Read, Liam Messam, Steven Luatua, he will now bide his time and see if England come knocking.Some difficulties are easing slowly, at least. Japan and Italy are visiting Samoa in June, with the Azzurri also heading to Suva for a Fijian showdown. At the 2015 World Cup, ‘Tier Two’ sides will not be subjected to the same crammed schedule as 2011 – an injustice an outspoken Eliota Fuimaono-Sapolu angrily likened to “slavery, the holocaust and apartheid” rolled into one.More meaningful matches would be fantastic though, and surely the best way to achieve that is for more established neighbours to step up. You have to believe Samoa and Fiji – even Tonga with time – would put up a decent fight in an expanded Rugby Championship. Granted, the southern hemisphere calendar is already saturated, but some re-jigging, maybe to reduce the format to one match each, would help. Failing that, how about an annual home-and-away fortnight of games against the All Blacks? Mouth-watering. Given their current crop, Samoa might get close to winning as well.All-action Samoan: Jack Lam for the HurricanesLeicester Tigers behemoth Logovi’i Mulipola is hugely dynamic and hard-hitting prop. Just ask Clermont’s stellar names. Tightheads James Johnston of Saracens and big brother Census at Toulouse can mix it with the most destructive scrummagers. Scrum-half Kahn Fotuali’i of Northampton is a class act. Hurricanes’ back Alapati Leuia is a prodigiously strong, elusive runner, while franchise teammate Jack Lam has proven himself as perhaps the planet’s form breakdown forward. For a population of around 188,000, to be consistently churning out such quality is simply amazing. TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

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Ireland v South Africa talking points

first_img Ireland are building strength in depthThere was a lot of doom and gloom in the build up to this game with column inches devoted to Ireland’s long injury list as they prepared to face the world’s number two side.  Even the most optimistic of Ireland fans did not expect Saturday’s result (never mind that scoreline) with many feeling the most positive frame of mind was to look at this as an experimental autumn series that would make way for a strong Six Nations, from which the World Cup squad would be selected. Commenting on the injuries Paul O’Connell said: “You move out and we move on,” and that is exactly what Ireland showed. Joe Schmidt is building a strong squad and this series is giving the likes of Jack McGrath, Sean Cronin and Rhys Ruddock invaluable experience for a big year ahead.Making an entrance: Ruddock was a late replacement for HenrySchmidt continues to surpriseSchmidt came into the Ireland job with a reputation for attacking flair and producing sides that are inventive with the ball in hand. What was impressive at the Aviva Stadium on Saturday was seeing the Irish defence being so strong and able to match South Africa in the physical aspects of the game. The Springboks found themselves being hit hard by two men in the tackle and were driven back time and again. This slowed down their attacking ball and meant the likes of the talented Pollard and the speedsters out wide were unable to find any room or space. Judging by this defensive display, particularly in the first half, Ireland will not be easy to beat any time soon. Sexton’s ‘tweak’ a warning to Irish abroadHe may be the only one of Ireland’s first choice internationals playing outside the Pro12, but he’s one of the most important men on the pitch. Johnny Sexton’s talents have been recognised for years but now his partnership with Conor Murray is reaching world class levels. Their kicking game was outstanding and allowed Ireland to keep the big South African side turning. Knowing that Sexton injured his hamstring playing for Racing Métro the previous week, it struck fear in the hearts of Ireland fans when he started stretching it in the final quarter. I don’t blame Racing for getting as much as they can out of their players when they pay them so well but it’s worrying for Ireland that Sexton could potentially be playing every week between now and the end of May.  After that he will be back in Leinster’s care but it’s imperative with the World Cup only ten months away that he returns in in one piece.Smooth operator: Glancy says Sexton’s partnership with Murray is world classTactically turn teams strengths into weaknessesAgainst the Welsh in the Six Nations, Sexton nullified the threat of their wingers by forcing them to run backwards to retrieve kicks. With New Zealand last year, Ireland targeted the breakdown. On Saturday, despite the South African line out being regarded as the best in the world, Ireland counteracted this by stepping off from the maul and thus removing the offside line. This tactic forced the South Africans to react, which they struggled to do.Debutant: Payne made his first appearance for Ireland in the midfieldPundit’s apology was the cherry on top Sorry Boks. This is Joe Schmidt’s Ireland. Think again. #IREvRSA— Rugby Onslaught (@Rugbyonslaught) November 8, 2014 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ireland defied the odds to beat South Africa 29-15 in Dublin on Saturday. Here are five things we learned about Joe Schmidt’s side from the match… Wrapped up: Murray and Ruddock congratulate Bowe on his try A great moment came after the match for Ireland fans watching it on RTÉ, when George Hook, a man considered the most outspoken and opinionated on Irish rugby, was forced to issue an apology.  It lasted over a minute as he said sorry for underestimating Schmidt, for not believing the players had a chance against South Africa and without breaking into a smile (or looking particularly happy about the result) said it was “extraordinary how you can get it so wrong… And I am very happy to be wrong.”  Hook doesn’t usually eat humble pie so this was a treat for everyone including Brent Pope and Conor O’Shea who giggled beside him, enjoying every minute.Johnny Sexton is the Ireland cover star this month – click here to see what else is in the mag.last_img read more

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England tour: Is captaincy overrated?

first_imgDylan Hartley’s captaincy has been a fundamental part of England’s revival under Eddie Jones – what makes a good captain or is it all a load of hokum? Back in 2013 Wales battered England into submission, 30-3, in Cardiff ending the Grand Slam dreams of Stuart Lancaster’s team and claiming the Six Nations title for themselves. The result had far-reaching ramifications.It put the kibosh on the ambitions of several English players going on the British & Lions tour to Australia later that summer, including then-captain Chris Robshaw, and it sealed Sam Warburton’s appointment as skipper of that trip.Three years on and Lancaster’s replacement, Eddie Jones, has been talking up the chances of Dylan Hartley being made leader of the Lions when they head to New Zealand in 2017. He has done his cause no harm by leading England to a Slam and a series win in Australia eight months after it looked as if he could be out with the international washing after missing the World Cup.So is Hartley some kind of alchemist who has helped, with some major assistance from Jones, turn a bunch of flops into the second highest-ranked team in the world, has he just got lucky or is it a bit of both?Martin Johnson, England’s greatest on-field leader, always told us that captaincy was over-rated and the mystique attached to it was all media nonsense.The greatest: Martin Johnson is widely considered the greatest England captain of all timeHe said you had to have leaders all over the pitch and his side, that won the World Cup in 2003, was chock-a-block with them.He had Lawrence Dallaglio, Matt Dawson, Will Greenwood, Jonny Wilkinson, Phil Vickery, Neil Back and co around him to help out. But Johnson was King of the Jungle, even if he did not want to say it publicly.Hartley has a similar back-up team. He has three vice-captains in Mike Brown, Owen Farrell and Billy Vunipola, James Haskell and Robshaw have extensive captaincy experience, George Ford calls the shots from No 10 and George Kruis runs the line-out. But Hartley is still the boss on the pitch.As captain you have to be in touch with the lads but you cannot be one of the lads – there is a line. After the second Test win in Australia, Jones told us that Hartley had pulled up one of the squad for being late for a meeting, by two minutes. The boss loved that because he reckons that if standards slip, even little ones, then the whole operation can go awry. You can’t do that if you have staggered in at 5am with them the night before. Will Carling once recalled being given an earful by Rob Andrew for having one over the eight at a post-match dinner when he was a young England captain. Carling was 22 and an amateur at the time – but as Andrew reminded him, he was still England captain.Role model: Rob Andrew was said to have reminded Will Carling of his responsibilities as England captainOn the pitch in Melbourne, towards the end of the first half, when England were staging their rearguard action and a couple of players started putting their five pennyworth in with referee Craig Joubert. Hartley jumped on that one pretty quickly reminding them to put a sock in it because it could cost England a penalty. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Leading from the front: Dylan Hartley has been roundly praised for his leadership role center_img When Mike Brearley was recalled as England cricket captain in 1981 and started to turn the series that would become known as ‘Botham’s Ashes’ he receive a letter. In his book, The Art of Captaincy, Brearley recalls that it read: “Dear Brearley, There is an old Italian proverb; if you want to know that a fish is bad, look at its head…..” It looks like England have got their heads right, in more ways than one.Having a gifted team is handy though, there is no substitute for that. As Big Billy says: “He will always put the team first. If he thinks you aren’t pulling your weight he will tell you, and if you are doing a good job he will tell you. He is very inspirational, and a lot of boys follow him in that respect.”So communication is a big part of being a captain – talking to your team and to the referee. Warren Galtand said the thing that clinched the Lions captaincy for Warburton in 2013 was the way he managed the referee, Steve Walsh, in that game in Cardiff.Respect: Richie McCaw was trustred by all the players around him as skipperNext up is you have got to be worth your place. Hartley ticks the boxes on that score, like all the great captains from David Kirk to Richie McCaw, through Johnson, Paul O’Connell, Jean Pierre Rives and Willie John McBride. He is not quite on their level as a skipper yet, but he is getting there.Then you have to be a motivator – and this is where the Johnson theory gains some credence. If you need your captain to motivate you to play Test rugby then you really are in the wrong job.Johnson was not a tub-thumper, in fact as the players were in the tunnel ahead of the 2003 World Cup final he didn’t say a word. He just looked back at his team, knew they were ready to rumble and got on with it.The most important factor in captaincy is decision-making, especially when you are under the pump in a high-octane international. Johnson, McCaw and John Eales, the great Wallaby, and all the rest of the great captains had the knack of making the right call at the right time.Contender: Sam Warburton has a rival in Dylan Hartley as Lions captainEngland had an infamous leadership wobble against Wales during the World Cup but there have been no signs of that so far under Hartley’s – or his leadership team’s – watch.last_img read more

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The greatest full-backs of all time: Tom Kiernan

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Major teams: University College Cork, Cork Constitution, MunsterCountry: IrelandTest span: 1960-73Ireland caps: 54 (54 starts)Lions caps: 5 (5 starts)Test points: 193 (2T, 27C, 42P, 2DG)Barely into his twenties, Kiernan was picked to face the English in London and played with such assurance and swift thought that he won over a nation. He didn’t have searing pace but had every other skill in his arsenal, could scan play from the back brilliantly and could kick goals with the best of them.By the time he quit in 1973, he had every Irish record going – most caps (54), most points (158) and most games as captain (24). As a Lion he twice toured South Africa. In 1962 he was in and out like a kitchen drawer thanks to injury, but in 1968 he was their bold captain – despite having initially declined to tour due to his job as an accountant. In the first Test he kicked 17 points and by the end he had scored 35 of the Lions’ Test points – another record. Tom Kiernan of Ireland Tom Kiernan was thrust into the Ireland senior side straight from Irish Universities. The full-back went on to break records, and assert himself as one of the greatest of all timecenter_img TAGS: The Greatest Players A brilliant covering defender, Kiernan had superb hands and could kick with either foot. Ray McLoughlin, who preceded him as Ireland captain, says he can’t recall ever seeing him drop a ball. Perhaps Kiernan’s was a charmed life. He helped Ireland to their first win over South Africa with a mishit kick that crept over the bar, making it 9-6 in 1965.At the end of his reign, he led Ireland to a 10-0 draw with New Zealand in Dublin – still Ireland’s best result against the All Blacks. Five years later he coached Munster to a 12-0 defeat of the All Blacks in Limerick, a match so famous they made a West End show about it. His playing days were done but Kiernan was still producing magic.last_img read more

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Anatomy of a rugby transfer: The curious case of Johan Goosen

first_img New home: Montpellier’s full-back Johan Goosen attacks La Rochelle It has been labelled one of the sorriest transfer sagas in modern rugby history, but what have we learnt from Johan Goosen’s move to Montpellier? This feature first appeared in Rugby world magazine in October. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Unimpressed: Former Racing 92 talisman Yannick NyangaAdding a counter to Nyanga’s stated scepticism is Gerbrandt Grobler. He was also at Racing at the time and had a history of playing against Goosen during their high-school years in South Africa.“He is a good human being,” the now Gloucester lock says, providing a character reference. “Obviously his (retiring) was not the right decision,to breach contract, but I support him. He’s my friend. It’s tough because he is a great man and he only did what is best for his friends and family. Lifeis too short to be unhappy.“He wanted his freedom. He wanted his son to grow up on a farm. He wanted his space. He is a man who grew up on a farm, but we are not talking about a small place with a few goats and a sheep. It’s Africa, man!”Focusing on the rugby, does Grobler believe the deadly kicker will be a star at Montpellier? “Of course. He’s a great player who makes things happen. You are more confident with him in your team than playing against him.”For all of the drawn-out drama here, a few select sources within the game give a sense that this saga was a one-off.Rugby World understands that Goosen signed a lucrative contract extension with Racing between March and April 2016 that was worth a minimum of €500,000 a year, rising potentially to €600,000 with performance bonuses. Having then sought some outside counsel after his award win and playing in the 2016 Rugby Championship for South Africa, the player took the decision to ‘retire’.Related: Top 14 transfers for season 2018/19According to an informed source, who wishes to remain anonymous: “Goosen had a €1m ‘transfer fee’ written into his Racing agreement then, so if anybody wanted to sign him they had to pay Racing €1m. That became the sticking point.“Then there was all the stuff about him going to take off 18 months and going to the farm and retiring from rugby, which was just obviously bulls***. Montpellier eventually paid the transfer fee. It was around €1.5m in the end – that’s gross, which is close to €1m net.”As mentioned above, Goosen has hit back at any challenge that he did not yearn for a return to rural life by stating that he returned to South Africa and then headed over to Montpellier for “the sun, the space and the nature”.However much the move may sound to you like football dealings, though, there are big differences. Traditionally in rugby, players sign shorter-term contracts – of two to three years – so that they can play out the duration of the contract, move on to another team and start again. In football, longer contracts add value to transfer fees.As it stands in England at the moment, due to the current standard Premiership Rugby contracts, clubs cannot begin courting recruits before 1 January – the standard contract ends on 30 June. In France the rules are different and it is actually 12 months before the end of a contract when you can begin negotiating with another party.Big move: Gaël Fickou made a transfer to Stade FrancaisWhile an agreement of fees between clubs for a transfer before a contract runs its course does happen in the UK and Ireland, a lot comes down to club finances. There simply is not a lot of money flying around. While in France, there has been a quick rise in indemnity clauses in young players’ contracts due to the high demand for JIFF players (French-qualified youngsters of which clubs need a minimum number in their squads). So ‘transfer fees’ are included in a number of young French stars’ contracts. It is also known to happen in South Africa, which is player rich but where franchises are cash poor.We have seen big moves for star players in France before. It was reported that Louis Picamoles joined Montpellier from Northampton for around €1m. This summer, Gaël Fickou went from Toulouse to Stade Français for a reported €800,000 following club negotiations.Yoann Maestri also joined Stade but his situation was different. He’d signed a pre-contract agreement with La Rochelle and if any side pulls out of such a deal, the transgressor must front up ‘damages’ as specified in the Ligue Nationale de Rugby (LNR) contracts. The default fee is normally the yearly wage set forth in the contract, so it is likely Stade simply paid that fee to get Maestri.Changes are afoot in France. It was announced by LNR that the salary cap – which had been set at €10m – will be shifted upwards to €11.3m and fixed at that cap for the next three seasons.While two sources interviewed for this article have been preparing for a future in which big transfer fees like Goosen’s would also be included in a team’s final cap, this has not come to pass for the time being. Something that will be included in the cap is pay-off amounts for players being asked to leave a club.Transfer fees are clearly more common than many realise – ProD2 sides and those facing relegation will hope JIFF talent is still attractive to other teams – and Goosen’s case highlights issues in this area. Yet if you take all of this into account, have Goosen’s manoeuvres actually changed the business of rugby?As our source says: “If Goosen got away with this deal I think we’d see more (players retiring), but he didn’t. At the end of the day, Montpellier have had to pay a large sum of money.”center_img IN A REPEAT of last season’s Top 14 final, reigning champions Castres faced Montpellier in round one of this season’s competition. Again, Castres triumphed. Yet there was something different this time.At 15 for Montpellier was Johan Goosen. The South African, who can play ten, full-back and centre, shot back into the international consciousness in 2015-16. Having starred for Racing 92 that season, he was picked by the Springboks in August 2016 – earning his seventh cap and his first since November 2014. He would end up playing six more times for them before the year was out.In October that year, Goosen was also named as the best player of the Top 14’s 2015-16 season, beating Racing team-mate Dan Carter, and Toulon’s Fijian wing Josua Tuisova to the title.Yet these career-high moments are not what he has become famous for – or should that be infamous. It was his actions in mid-December 2016 when he announced he was retiring from rugby, and thus leaving Racing, aged just 24. He was quitting the game, it was announced, so he could become a commercial director at a saddle-horse stud farm back home in Bloemfontein.It was something of an open secret in France that Goosen wanted out of his freshly-signed deal, but few could have predicted he’d step away from the game of rugby entirely to escape it.At the time Racing’s president Jacky Lorenzetti publicly said: “We regret that so obviously talented a young player has been misguided and abandoned professional rugby.“Racing 92 reserves the right for a judicial follow-up to both Johan Goosen and those who advise him.”Try time: Goosen celebrates scoring for the Springboks in 2016How long did the exile from rugby last? By February 2018, French publications reported that a deal had been done between Racing and Montpellier, the latter club – owned by mega-wealthy Mohed Altrad – paying €1.5m (£1.3m) to secure Goosen’s services for the following season.In March 2018, he was in training kit, running around with the Cheetahs of Bloemfontein – where he had previously played 27 times in Super Rugby – with the franchise announcing that he would train with them until June.By April, Goosen played for them in a Guinness Pro14 fixture against Munster.In all, thanks to this fleeting retirement, there were 15 months between games for Goosen and more than 18 months between Top 14 fixtures.The dust may never truly settle on this transfer affair, but some are taking stock. In a recent interview with Midi Olympique in France, Goosen said of his ‘retirement’ move: “It was madness. I made a mistake. But that’s life. Paradoxically, I have also grown a lot over the past two years. I emptied my head and allowed my body time to recover…“I went through bad times. I was very sad. I thought all of this would never end. Sometimes I said to myself, ‘Maybe I should go back to Racing?’ And at other times, I was persuaded that going back wouldn’t do me any good. I was lost.“If a player is in my situation, I would say to him, ‘Do not do it, you will regret it. The price to pay is too heavy.’”Past colours: Goosen during his time with Racing 92Goosen went on to say that he yearned for wide, open spaces: “I am South African, I need space and, in the suburbs of Paris, the buildings are so close to each other that I felt like I was choking. I had the uncomfortable feeling of living in a box. The worst part is that my son was also very unhappy.“Because I was very unhappy off the pitch, I could not have stayed for five more years (at Racing)… Money has nothing to do with it. I wanted another life, the sun, the space and the nature. I’ll have all this in Montpellier.”Responding to the comments, recently retired Racing and France back-row Yannick Nyanga has his doubts about it.Nyanga tells Rugby World of Goosen’s stated reasons for leaving Paris: “I think it’s a farce. Nobody believed it. It was all quite ridiculous and retiring cost him a lot. One year (plus) without playing is huge – it’ll take time for him to get back on to his best level of playing.“At first we were all surprised when he left because we didn’t expect that. He had a big deal with Racing and he had only just finished his first year.“I perfectly understand anyone’s reasons for leaving because high-level sport is also a business. I’m a football fan too. I see players leaving clubs every season because they double their pay, the club get money from the transfers and then other players raise their pay. That’s the business.“But I don’t know if other players will use this (retiring like Goosen has) because it means not playing for a year. It will cost a lot, and at the end of the day I’m not sure that it is worth it.” This feature first appeared in Rugby world magazine in October.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter for the latest news in rugby.last_img read more

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The importance of Ireland lock James Ryan

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This article originally appeared in the February 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. High standards: James Ryan wins a lineout at the World Cup (Getty Images) After a disappointing World Cup campaign by Ireland, the second-row will be desperate to return to winning ways in the green jersey. Tom English reports The Big Cheese is supposedly a line from a movie which either Deegan or Dan Leavy started applying to Ryan. To Ryan’s annoyance, it stuck. “When he first came in, it was a meteoric rise,” adds Best. “There was a lot of talk about him and I was expecting a really big character who talks, talks, talks, but he’s not like that. He leads by the way he plays. He’s more comfortable now in talking to the group and when you ask him to say a few words it’s really to the point and exactly the right pitch. Everybody listens.“What I really liked about him from the start is that he didn’t come in with an attitude of, ‘Yeah, this is where I’m meant to be…’ He was respectful and those are the types of people who tend to last longer. He’s well brought up and it’s obvious that he’s not just a talented rugby player but a rugby player who is absolutely immersed in the game.“He has that humility, that’s what you get. I remember when I was first called up I had the attitude that I was lucky to be there, I had a huge appreciation of it, knowing how hard it was to get to that level. James had the same thing. He understood how difficult it was to get there and how hard he’d have to work to stay there. As a senior player you spot that and you relate to it.“Everybody loves him, whether you’re myself at 37 or Johnny Sexton at 34 or Jacob Stockdale at 23 or Jordan Larmour at 22. Everybody wants to spend time with him and that’s a great trait to have. To span generations and be that likeable is not easy.”Trophy time: James Ryan and Dan Leavy enjoy the 2018 Grand Slam (Getty Images)That first game of the Grand Slam season was Ryan’s first competitive start and Best noticed things about him that day. The tougher it got out there in Paris, the more he wanted the ball. The number of collisions he was involved in was through the roof, the lines of running were intelligent, the carrying was relentless. There was a technical ferocity about him in his 68 minutes on the field that made you recall something Cian Healy said about him when he first saw him years before.“I first saw him at Clontarf and he was a string bean – skinny, tall, talented. Then when you see him step up to the plate its jaw-dropping,” said the Leinster and Ireland prop.“It’s no good going purely for grunt nowadays,” says Best. “Everybody is big, everybody is hard, everybody is well organised in terms of the defensive line. If all he does is grunt he will keep getting tackled, but he’s different. He’s very good at going back against the grain and defenders don’t see him until the last minute. The fact that he’s a big lump means he’s on top of them before they can get themselves set. He has an exceptional awareness ofwhere to be in order to make yards.“In practically every game I’ve played with him he’s been a seven or an eight out of ten minimum, and he’s been higher than that more often than not. That’s seven, eight, nine out of ten in every minute. He’ll find ways to get better and he’ll have to because he’s no longer the new kid on the block, people know him now, they’re planning for him. He’ll improve because he has the honesty and the self-awareness.”After the failure at the World Cup in Japan he has a renewed desire as well, if it was needed. The next chapter in the James Ryan story is about to unfold.center_img His elevation to the Test side began in earnest in 2018 when he made his first big start against France in a game that will be remembered forever for Johnny Sexton’s late drop-goal. “James came in and all the Leinster people were calling him Cheese and the Big Cheese and all sorts of abbreviations around that,” says Rory Best, his captain in the green jersey.“He’s a twin and I met his brother in Japan,” says Henderson of Mark Ryan, a talented full-back but one who suffered terribly bad luck with injury. Their dad, also called Mark, was a former Lansdowne player. “His brother is called Chicken Soup. So there’s Cheese and Chicken Soup. Don’t ask me what it’s about. A Dublin thing maybe. It goes straight over my head.”Best says: “They have their own language, these young lads. He talks to you in letters rather than words. ‘Hey, BM…’ will be ‘Hey, big man…’ or when he’s texting it’ll be, ‘HB-BM’ and that’ll be ‘Happy birthday, big man’. There are people who understand what this language is but I can’t get my head round it being so much older than him.” Ryan started to make his presence felt in 2016 when he captained the Ireland U20 team – including Jacob Stockdale, Andrew Porter and Max Deegan – all the way to the Junior World Championship final. En route, they became the first Irish men’s international side to beat New Zealand, Chicago still being five months in the distance.Like Brian O’Driscoll before him, Ryan made his Irish debut before playing his first competitive game for Leinster. He won a Grand Slam, a Pro14 and a Champions Cup at the first time of asking. In the 2018 European Cup final against Racing 92 he was Man of the Match. Later that year he put in a seismic display in victory over the All Blacks, carrying 17 times and making 20 tackles.“His engine is incredible,” says Iain Henderson, his second-row partner with Ireland. “Loads of athletes around the world have incredible engines but it’s being able to do the right thing with it that counts. He continually produces performances that stand out.“He’ll be Ireland captain, probably sooner rather than later I would say. When his name is on the team sheet you can put your mortgage on him turning up for you.”Double act: Ireland locks Iain Henderson and James Ryan (Getty Images)Ryan doesn’t say a lot to the media but his backstory is utterly compelling. He is the great grandson of Dr James Ryan, founding member of the Irish Volunteers and the Fianna Fáil party.His ancestor was a young man of 24 when he entered the General Post Office (GPO) in April 1916. The Easter Rising was set and Ryan was at the heart of it. As the GPO came under heavy bombardment from the British military, some of the most storied men in Irish history took Ryan under their wing and trusted him to relay the truth of what happened there.None of them believed they would survive – most were executed – but they also believed that Ryan would be spared on account of his youth. They were right, but Ryan was still imprisoned in Stafford and then Frongoch. Upon his release, he returned to Ireland and became a prominent and historic politician. He left behind an almighty legacy.The young Ryan was the golden boy since 2016. He took an age to lose a game as a pro and would always rail against the notion that he had no concept of what disappointment felt like on a rugby pitch. He’d speak of losing a senior cup final with his school, St Michael’s, as evidence. That one bit hard at the time. So, too, did losing that Junior World Cup final to England. And a hamstring injury that laid him low. The importance of Ireland lock James RyanJames Ryan has had a charmed existence as a professional rugby player, a trophy-laden two years that have seen him become a European champion with Leinster, a Grand Slam winner with Ireland and the recipient of so many other awards that you fear for the stability of the shelving system in his place in Dublin.He’d done all of that by the age of 22. He’s now 23 and has seen a little more of life in the game of late, some new exposure to its crueller realities. Though he was exceptional in Ireland’s 2019 Six Nations campaign – he was second only to Billy Vunipola in terms of carries, despite playing just four games, and swept the boards at the Irish Rugby Players Awards – the team slumped into a hole they never emerged from. From Six Nations to World Cup, things slowly unravelled as the Joe Schmidt era ground to the most anticlimactic end.Ryan played solidly in the tournament but like the rest of them he went down with the ship. “You’ll never see something like Japan as a positive,” says Greg Feek, Ireland’s scrum coach during Schmidt’s time, “but his experiences in 2019 will bring more resilience and given what he’s already got, more resilience will make him an even more frightening prospect.“From the first moment I spent time with him I could tell he was a sponge of learning. He just wants to listen to anything you say. He loves information. With some players there’s a lot of work to do to get them to the right place but with James it was just a bit of fine sandpapering that was required.“He’s still young, he’s athletic and has a massive engine and incredible aerobic capacity. His X-factor is his desire; he’s relentless whether he’s on the field or at the computer or in meetings. He’s always the last to leave conversations. You can tell by the body language of some players that they want to get away but his thirst for any little bit of edge he can find makes him stay until the end. He’s a very driven character. Japan won’t change that. If anything, it’ll spur him on.”last_img read more

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In Texas, first rebuilt home dedicated after Bastrop County fires

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In Texas, first rebuilt home dedicated after Bastrop County fires Rector Collierville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA By EDOT staffPosted Apr 10, 2012 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Episcopal Diocese of Texas] On Holy Saturday, the first house completely built and funded by the Bastrop County Long Term Recovery Team (BCLTRT) was dedicated. It will belong to Hilary Shepherd and her daughter Jessica. All those who had been involved with rebuilding took part at a service of dedication.The Rev. Gill Keyworth (left) presents Shepherd with the gift of a cross.“It was truly a wonderful occasion to be able dedicate a home that had risen from ashes, on the weekend of Easter,” said the Rev. Gill Keyworth, disaster relief co-coordinator for the Diocese of Texas.The house was funded jointly by the Shepherds from their Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) grant in addition to grants from the Episcopal Diocese of Texas, Episcopal Relief & Development, Calvary Episcopal Church Bastrop and Austin Disaster Relief Network. Mennonite Disaster Services built the home in just eight weeks with volunteers from across the U.S. and Canada.Of the 1670 homes destroyed by the 2011 Labor Day fires in Bastrop County, 264 have been recognized as both not insured and owned by low income families. Many homeowners who had insurance are already rebuilding. Some are doing the construction themselves while others have building contractors. Of those doing the construction themselves some are running out of money before the home is complete.Thousands of people have already been to Bastrop to volunteer their time with the cleanup. Many hundreds of college students were welcomed during spring break. Clearing of debris continued and many new fences and sheds were built.Homeowner Hilary Shepherd triumphantly displays the keys to her new homeBCLTRT is working hard to complete case management, acquire building grants and welcome volunteer help. There are many projects and rebuilds underway as the team helps many families complete their homes.To sign up for volunteer accommodation visit www.umcswtx.org/faith-village-registration. To find out more about the work of the Bastrop County Long Term Recovery team visit www.bcltrt.org Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

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Seychelles churches will commit to reconstruction following floods

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Anglican Communion News Service] A bishop in flood-stricken Seychelles has said the church in that country will be “actively involved in the reconstruction efforts” through “raising funds for building materials.”The Rt. Rev. James Wong, bishop of the Diocese of Seychelles, told the Anglican Communion News Service (ACNS): “The situation in Seychelles is very sad and challenging. We have so many problems already and the floods have just brought more physical and material difficulty.”The Seychelles’ economy is mainly dependent on tourism, which is easily affected by such events.Reports indicate that up to 350 families have been displaced or remain unsheltered as they wait for their homes to be rehabilitated due to heavy rains and high tides.Experts are assessing the damage in order to establish the immediate needs of the people and the associated costs.“Currently, it’s very difficult to quantify the damage,” said Wong. “I am waiting for a report from the government.“Some people who have been displaced are staying at the Seychelles Police Academy. The government has asked guesthouses to open their doors and help accommodate stranded victims.”The bishop is concerned that the education sector is usually one of the hardest hit during such disasters.He explained, “Some schools closed for some time and those that are open are asking pupils to carry their own drinking water for fear of water pollution.”Last week, Archbishop Ian Ernest, primate of the Indian Ocean and bishop of Mauritius, asked the Anglican Communion for prayers and financial support. He also wrote to supporters to raise awareness of the crisis. Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET By Bellah ZuluPosted Feb 7, 2013 Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Anglican Communion Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Seychelles churches will commit to reconstruction following floods Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

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Archbishop of Canterbury XI to take on the Vatican –…

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Ecumenical & Interreligious New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Anglican Communion, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Archbishop Justin Welby with the Anglican XI cricketers. Photo: ACNS[Anglican Communion News Service] A Church of England XI will take on a team of cricketers representing the Vatican later this month in a repeat of last year’s historic first encounter in Canterbury.The St Peter’s Cricket Team batted first in last year’s match at Kent County Cricket Club’s Spitfire Ground in Canterbury; and scored 106 from their 20 overs. But in a tight battle, the Archbishop’s XI went on to win by six wickets with five balls to spare.Now, the Anglican side have been invited to Rome for a re-match, and will take on the Vatican XI on Sunday 25 October, after the final mass for 200 bishops and other delegates who have been attending the Synod on the Family.This afternoon the C of E team visited Lambeth Palace for a meeting with Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby who tweeted a picture of the meeting using the hashtag #CofeVatican2020, saying: “With the Archbishop’s XI cricket team. Wishing them success against Vatican side later this month.”“The cricket will be fun and a strong symbolism of our ecumenical ties,” the C of E Captain, the Revd Steve Gray, said, adding: “though we will of course do our best to emerge victorious again.” Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Archbishop of Canterbury XI to take on the Vatican – at cricket Submit a Press Release Posted Oct 6, 2015 Archbishop of Canterbury, last_img read more

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‘I would talk with Boko Haram’: Anglican Communion secretary general

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Michael Grear says: Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN Africa, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Anglican Communion News Service] The secretary general of the Anglican Communion, Archbishop Josiah Idowu-Fearon, has said he would be prepared to talk with Boko Haram, if their leadership could be identified.Speaking in a HARDtalk interview with BBC journalist Stephen Sackur, Idowu-Fearon warned that it was “not helpful” to talk of a “fundamental struggle between Christians and Islam” or use language which suggests “a form of genocide” against Christians.Talking of his own experiences in Nigeria, Idowu-Fearon said: “The Boko Haram crisis we are facing does not discriminate. They come under the guise of Islam but we all know … that this is not the Islam we are used to.“For example, in that north-eastern part of Nigeria it is predominantly Muslim – Shia and Sunni Islam. Who are they trying to convert there? So it isn’t religion per se, that’s the point.”Idowu-Fearon didn’t criticize Pope Francis who had spoken of “a form of genocide” saying that the Pope had made his statement based on the information available to him; but he added: “The information that I have, what I lived with in my country, I wouldn’t use the term ‘religious genocide’ because with Boko Haram, more Muslims have been killed than Christians.”He laughed off criticisms from some quarters that he was a “Muslim Bishop” because of his lengthy studies of Islam and dialogue with Islamic leaders, and said: “I didn’t choose this ministry. God called me. And I believe God has done that for a specific purpose.“I come from the northern parts of Nigeria where religion is being used, and has been used, to divide us along Christian – Muslim lines. In the south west we have a significant huge number of Muslims and Christians. They don’t fight. Why are we fighting in the north?“I believe my calling is to help the Muslim to see me as a fellow-Nigerian who comes from the northern part of the country.”Idowu-Fearon acknowledged that there “would always be room for conflict” between Islam and Christianity because both religions were missiological; but he said that “our job, my job, is to help the Muslim and the Christian to understand each other.”Asked whether his bridge-building work could extend to dialogue with Boko Haram, Idowu-Fearon said: “If we can actually identify who the true leadership is . . . why not? . . . Dialogue is the beginning of the solution … If they are willing.”He continued: “We must all understand one thing: these are all God’s children, whether they are criminals or not. They are all God’s children and God love us equally. These have chosen to behave the way they are behaving and the responsibility is on those of us who believe there is a better way to help them to find it.“That’s why I am a Christian. That’s why I am involved in bridge-building.”During the 25-minute interview, Sackur touched on a range of issues, including conflicts within the Anglican Communion. Idowu-Fearon told him that Anglicans were working on a range of “Kingdom-things,” including Islamic extremism, corruption, poverty and bad governance. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK center_img Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel ‘I would talk with Boko Haram’: Anglican Communion secretary general Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments are closed. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA December 18, 2015 at 3:51 pm If the Archbishop wanted to speak with the leaders of Boko Haram, he could simply go to northeast Nigeria and let it be known he wishes to talk to their leaders. I am sure they would not kidnap him, nor torture him, nor kill him. They would all sit down together in the spirit of universal love and exchange a civilized and open discussion on the merits of all faiths and the error of their murderous ways towards Christians. That’s right, Archbishop, get started on your journey to Boko Haram territory where you will be welcomed with open, loving arms! Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Anglican Communion The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments (1) Rector Albany, NY By ACNS staffPosted Dec 18, 2015 Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

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