David Duncan to join Great Olympics for the 2014/15 season

first_imgReports are that former head coach of Hearts of Oak, David Duncan is on his way to Great Olympics for this season.According to a source of the Accra based Club who disclosed this to sportscrusader.com, negotiations between them and the charismatic coach are at an advanced stage and barring any unforeseen circumstances, Duncan will head the technical department of the Club in the coming 2014/15 football season.“We are at the final stages of negotiations and all things being equal, Duncan will officially sign for us by Friday”, the source disclosed.According to him, the coach who was axed by Hearts of Oak following a dispute with the Board over a host of issues is ready to return to the touchlines again after being inactive for close to a year.“It wasn’t easy because initially the coach decided not to coach again, until the Hearts saga was resolved. But after several consultations he decided to heed to our call and take the job. He has agreed to join us and we are happy about it.”On what becomes of the present coach of the Club who qualified Great Olympics back to the premiership, he was of the view that: “he has been spoken to on the need to augment the technical team as well and has no problems with it.” Though he was tight-lipped on the position of Samuel Quaye, sportscrusader.com deduced from the conversation that he will be demoted to the rank of an assistant coach.When contacted, the Director of the club, Mr. Fred Pappoe confirmed the news and added that the Club is left with just about 1% for David Duncan to sign a binding contract with the club but can confidently say that Duncan will be the next coach of Accra Great Olympics.The former Great Olympics coach who has had stints with clubs in South Africa and AshantiGold SC in Ghana has been seen as the best for the position and will take over the technical department of the club for the 2014/15 league season.last_img read more

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County Partnerships inspire 54,000 to Get into Golf

first_img England’s network of County Golf Partnerships (CGPs) are celebrating success after they inspired more than 54,000 people to have a go at golf in the last year. That’s up by an impressive 121 per cent on the previous 12 months and the newcomers are helping to generate additional income for golf clubs, driving ranges and coaches. Richard Flint, England Golf’s Development Manager, commented: “This is a great success story for the County Golf Partnerships and a satisfying reward for all their hard work.” The partnerships are proving particularly successful at attracting people aged over 16. Almost two-thirds of the total were in this age group and their number (34,458) has increased by a massive 217 per cent on 2010/11. It’s hoped that many of the newcomers will stay in golf. Already, over 19,000 of the total have taken follow-on coaching and over 2,000 have joined golf clubs. The new memberships are equal to an investment of more than £1.44m in golf clubs, before any additional spending on coaching, green fees and refreshments. (Based on an average membership subscription of £688.) The CGP network supports grass roots golf at county level and is an integral part of the England Golf Partnership’s (EGP) Whole Sport Plan for golf. These results were achieved in the third year of the current plan, which runs from 2009-2013. All CGPs offer activities, such as taster sessions and coaching programmes, to attract beginners and returners to the game, particularly those aged 16 and over. Each partnership has a development officer and they build strong relationships with local golf clubs, ranges and PGA professionals. A number of partnerships are starting to work with their local universities, colleges and businesses to create even more interest in golf. The EGP anticipates that the county partnerships will encourage even more people to try golf during the next 12 months when their activities will also be highlighted by the new Get into golf promotional campaign. Examples of activities offered by partnerships are detailed in the latest CGP Impact Report which can be downloaded at www.englandgolf.org/cgps 23 May 2012 County Partnerships inspire 54,000 to Get into Golf last_img read more

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Freshman epee brings ‘la voglia,’ international experience to Temple

first_imgVolunteer assistant coach Melissa Forsythe works primarily with the team’s epees.  No other Temple fencer has competed internationally during the NCAA fencing season.  “I was impressed when I saw her fence for the first time, and after we had several conversations, felt she would be a good fit for us,” Franke said. “Her international experience and results were consistently improving, and she’s very dedicated.” When being recruited during her senior year of high school, Franke told Calderaro she could attend international competitions while also competing with the Owls.  On Nov. 16, 2019, while the Owls were competing at the Penn Elite Meet, Calderaro was competing at an under-20 World Cup event in Italy.  Freshman epee Margherita Calderaro practices with junior epee Marielle Luke at the TU Pavilion on Feb. 27. | JEREMY ELVAS / THE TEMPLE NEWS “La voglia” is part of the reason she decided to come to an American university, so she could go to school and fence, she added.  “It’s not always easy to make these types of decisions,” Calderaro said. “But thanks to the support and help from my coaches, family and teammates, I have been able to do well so far.”  “La voglia” is still Calderaro’s secret to growing as an athlete.  “[Calderaro] came in as a good fencer but has really improved in the time that she’s been here,” Forsythe said. “She’s had to adjust to a new coach, which is tough when you’ve only had one coach your whole fencing career, like she has, but it’s been an adjustment she’s dealt with well.” Calderaro competed with Club Scherma Roma before joining Temple’s team. She finished in sixth place at the 2019 Junior Italian Championship Finals, third at the 2019 Italian Regional and second at the 2018 Cadet Italian Championship Finals. Freshman epee Margherita Calderaro has brought a “wealth of experience” in her first season with Temple University fencing, coach Nikki Franke said.  “Fencing in Italy is more of an individual sport,” Calderaro said. “It is not as much of a team sport like at American universities, even though all the people that I have met at Club Scherma Roma are very close friends of mine.” Calderaro learned to fence because of her father, Michele, who was a modern pentathlete, practicing five different sports: fencing, swimming, horseback riding, shooting and running. Her father signed her up for fencing lessons with his pentathlete friends, she said. To keep her Italian ranking and attend future international competitions, Calderaro needed to attend this specific competition.  Stefano Giommoni, Calderaro’s coach in Italy, taught her the “secret to growth” is “la voglia,” which means “the want,” she said.  “I give my best at everything, at practice, in school and in competitions,” Calderaro said. “I never do anything without putting 100-percent effort into it. With all the effort I put into practicing and getting ready for a competition, I’m quite confident in my abilities.”last_img read more

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NCS Playoffs: Up two sets, Ferndale volleyball’s season ends in first round playoff loss

first_imgFerndale >> The momentum switch was palpable, and the Ferndale Wildcats could not recover.The Ferndale High School volleyball team took a two sets to none lead over the favored Contra Costa Christian Cougars, only to see their season end 25-12, 31-29, 13-25, 17-25 and 15-17 in a five-set North Coast Section first-round thriller Tuesday at Ferndale High School.“Once our team gets down we have a hard time pulling ourselves back out of it,” a crestfallen Ferndale head coach Melissa Throssel said …last_img read more

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SA cyclist shatters 10-second barrier

first_img22 January 2013 Making full use of the Mexican high altitude conditions, the London 2012 Olympian obliterated the old record by 0.448 seconds to record a masterful 9.786 seconds. Cycling’s world governing body, the UCI, will shortly confirm the qualified riders for the UCI World Track Championships, which take place in Minsk, Belarus from 20 to 24 February. Esterhuizen’s name is expected on the list following his superb showing in Aguascalientes. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material It was an excellent weekend for Esterhuizen, who also finished in 11th place in the Keirin event after progressing to the second round with ease. The 20-year-old became the first South African rider to break the magical 10-second barrier over 200m, which could be equated to breaking the 10-second barrier for the 100m in athletics. Juan Peralta Gascon of Spain was the fastest qualifier in a time of 9.633 seconds. Kevin Sireau of France holds the World record of 9.572 seconds. SAinfo reporter Denis Dmitriev of Russia was the overall winner with Max Niederlag of Germany in second and Juan Peralta Gascon of Spain rounding out the placings. Significant stridesHis performances show the significant strides he has made since placing 11th in the sprint at London 2012. Esterhuizen is working with a new coach, having in December joined up with Andy Sparks, who coached him to the Junior 1Km World Time Trial title in 2010. Esterhuizen, however, won all three of his subsequent rides to win the B-final and finish in a credible ninth position overall. QualifyingAfter qualifying in eighth position out of 49 starters (only the fastest 16 riders qualify) he had a tough ride in the first round, narrowly losing to experienced Frenchman Michael D’Almeida who qualified in ninth position. South Africa’s Bernard Esterhuizen turned in a scintillating display of sprint cycling at the UCI Track World Cup in Aguascalientes, Mexico on the weekend, smashing his own national record of 10.234 seconds in the 200m sprint qualifying event. Nolan Hoffman, the winner of a silver medal in the 15km scratch race at the 2012 World Championships, has already qualified for the World Champs, which should mean South Africa will be represented in the endurance and sprint disciplines.last_img read more

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Durban to host World Marathon congress

first_img30 AprilThe names of the speakers for the 20th World Congress of the Association of International Marathons and Distance Races (AIMS), to be hosted by the Comrades Marathon Association (CMA) in Durban on 29 and 30 May, have been announced.The theme of the Congress, which will showcase some of the continent’s great African runners, is “Africa: The Home of Distance Runners”.SpeakersAmong the speakers will be Blanche Moila, the first black woman to be awarded Springbok colours and a former South African Sportswoman of the Year; three-time winner of the Boston Marathon, Ibrahim Hussein; and Olympic medallist, world champion and former multiple world record holder, Elana Meyer.Renowned exercise physiologist Professor Tim Noakes, the author of The Lore of Running, will also be part of the notable line-up.Keynote speakerThe keynote speaker will be Luis Felipe Posso. One of the world’s top sports management agents, including in the worlds of athletics and football, he has represented some of the top talents in global sport including South Africa’s Josiah Thugwane, the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games marathon champion.Posso’s address will focus on “The Emergence, Impact and Dominance of African Runners on the World of Distance Racing”.Personal experiences and perspectivesHussein, Moila and Meyer will talk about their personal experiences and perspectives on running, while Noakes will present an interesting take on the “Historical Reasons Why African Runners are Successful”.Race organisers will also have the opportunity to promote their races to over 50 000 runners and visitors at the Bonitas-Comrades Expo.Comrades MarathonThe Congress will culminate in all delegates attending the finish of the 89th edition of the Comrades Marathon on 1 June, where they will be accommodated in a special AIMS marquee on the finishing straight at the Sahara Stadium Kingsmead cricket ground in Durban.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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3 reasons to write great logs

first_imgYou’re on a geocaching roll, earning smileys left and right. With so many finds piling up, it’s tempting to post a TFTC and leave it at that… (Cue the screeching halt.) Before you do, give us a chance to convince you otherwise. SharePrint RelatedFAQ: Log upvotesMay 16, 2018In “News”New tools for your next trip into the great outdoors!January 17, 2017In “News”Six geocache outing planning mistakes you don’t know you are makingApril 30, 2019In “News” 3 reasons why great logs are a good thing:1: You’ll make a cache owner’s day.Yes, cache owners read your logs. Be sure to give your heartfelt thanks.2: Thoughtful logs help future seekers.Are there new conditions in an area? Did you find the geocache trickier than the difficulty rating implied? Geocachers will appreciate the information (but beware of leaving spoilers).3: Record a story-worthy moment.Logs are like a geocaching diary, helping you remember the great moments — and the hilarious. This just in: DraftsDrafts are now in the Geocaching® app. Drafts lets you start writing a log in the field on the Geocaching® app and finish it later in the app or on Geocaching.com. This feature was formerly known as Field Notes.There you have it: three reasons to write great logs and a new feature that makes doing so, easy. What are you waiting for? Get logging!Have a log you love? Tell us about it in the comments below. Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

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True warriors dont reveal plans to enemies says Chief Fox

first_imgBy Jorge Barrera APTN National News OTTAWA–First Nations chiefs say a major showdown with Canada looms on the horizon.Talk of blockades and protest is once again in the air as the diplomatic efforts by the First Nations leadership through the Assembly of First Nations appear to have failed to make any headway with the Harper government to deal with longstanding grievances around land, natural resources and the fiscal relationship between Ottawa and First Nations communities.Instead, the federal government has introduced deep cuts to First Nations organizations and tribal councils and has pushed legislation First Nations leaders say first needed their consent because of its impact on Aboriginal and treaty rights.The growing frustration flowed to the threshold of the House of Commons chamber Tuesday after a group of First Nations chiefs from Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario scuffled with security guards as they tried to enter the domain of MPs.The chiefs involved say that was only the beginning, but what is to come is being held close to the chest.“True warriors don’t go out and tell their enemies, ‘This is what we are going to do in a battle,’” said Onion Lake Cree Nation Chief Wallace Fox, who was among the chiefs involved in the confrontation with Parliament Hill guards.Fox, who leads an oil-rich First Nation in Saskatchewan, has emerged as one of the leading voices in the latest upsurge in First Nations anger over the state of affairs across the country.Samson Cree Elder Cecil Napoose says he’s convinced prophecy foretold the emergence of a leader like Fox who issued the call that led Tuesday to a scuffle between Parliament Hill security guards and chiefs on the threshold of the House of Commons chamber.Napoose was there with Fox and Anishinabek Grand Council Chief Madahbee, Serpent River First Nation Chief Isadore Day and Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak when they tried to enter the chamber to deliver a message Prime Minister Stephen Harper that the time for direct action had arrived.“He is the leader to challenge the government that the time has come,” said Napoose, whose community is in Alberta. “He is also a spiritual leader…his people are his power.”Napoose isn’t the only one who believes prophecy is on the side of Fox. Fox admits that others have approached him this week at the Assembly of First Nations special chiefs assembly in Gatineau, Que., saying they also believe his emergence was foretold.Fox, however, says he is not interested in any political office beyond his role as leader of Onion Lake. He believes Ottawa’s cuts to First Nations political organizations will lead to their demise anyway.Fox says he follows the traditional ideas of leadership.“I have to speak on behalf of the people,” said Fox. “I also have to listen to their direction.”Fox said the decision to take the fight to the heart of Canada’s democracy came in response to the demands from First Nations youth who are frustrated with the state of things in their communities across the country.“The youth are very frustrated across the country,” he said. “We wanted to show that we are listening to them.”Fox said Tuesday’s actions are a foreshadowing of things to come and the House of Commons’ passing of Bil C-45, the Harper majority government’s omnibus bill proves Ottawa still doesn’t take First Nations interests seriously.“We are not going to stop,” he said. “We are going to continue this fight.”Other chiefs have also picked up the same call.“I think you will start to see more direct actions and raising the level of awareness in this manner,” said Day.“We’ll stand strong. We’ll fight where we need to fight. We’ll shove where we need to shove and we’ll get into the rooms that we need to regardless of the impediments put in our way,” said Nepinak.But it’s not just chiefs who are driving the agenda of confrontation. Powered in part by social media, youth and grassroots activists are also planning to launch protest campaigns. There was even chatter around launching a blockade on the Trans-Canada in Saskatchewan, but it has since turned into a planned march along the highway.On Facebook and Twitter, a grassroots movement under the name Idle No More has been picking up steam and there are now planned Dec. 10 day of actions across the country under its banner. Plans for the day include protests at city halls, legislative assemblies and outside corporate offices.The movement, founded by a group of women from Saskatchewan, initially began with a focus on the omnibus bill, but has since included the broader cause of Indigenous rights, said one of the founders Jessica Gordon, 34, from Saskatoon.“It is our time now. We have been restless, we have been waiting for a moment to show that we need to be heard and we have been looking for a way to come together,” said Gordon.Gordon said the movement is committed to peaceful means with the broader aims of sending a message to Ottawa and educating the Canadian public about First Nations issues.“We say keep it peaceful,” she said. “The pipe will be raised. When we do that, we know that no that there is no violence involved at all.”This isn’t the first time that First Nations leader and grassroots activists have prepared for protests against the Harper government. Much of the current rhetoric echoes what chiefs said in late 2006 and in 2007 when former Roseau River chief Terry Nelson authored a resolution calling for a day of action on June 29, 2007.The Conservatives reacted by threatening to cut funding to First Nations organizations and then-Aboriginal affairs minister Jim Prentice struck a deal with Nelson. The Harper government also created the Specific Claims Tribunal which was announced by Harper and former AFN national chief Phil Fontaine on Parliament Hill. Only the Tyendinaga Mohawks launched action that day, shutting down the highway between Ottawa and Toronto and blocking a CN rail-line for 12 hours. The action costs about $100 million in economic damage.This time around, however, the Aboriginal Affairs federal portfolio is held by a minister chiefs believe to be “weak” and the Conservatives can no longer threaten funding cuts, because the cuts have already been announced.Several chiefs told APTN National News that the cuts have been liberating and gives them a flexibility they didn’t have [email protected]last_img read more

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CORRECTION Grande Prairie man fourth killed on BC Peace roads since January

first_imgCORRECTION: Sgt. Tim Paulmert with the RCMP’s Peace Region Traffic Services explained that the Grande Prairie man killed in Sunday’s crash on the South Taylor Hill was 29 years old, not 19 as previously reported.FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — A Grande Prairie man is officially the fourth person that has been killed on highways in the Peace Region since the start of 2018.According to RCMP Sgt. Tim Paulmert with Peace Region Traffic Services, the crash happened Sunday afternoon at around 4:45. A 29 year-old man from Grande Prairie was the driver and lone occupant of a late-2000’s GMC pickup truck travelling northbound on Highway 97. The pickup truck crossed the centreline just north of the new rest area near the top of the South Taylor Hill and struck a southbound semi-truck head-on. With files from Global BC: https://globalnews.ca/news/4061420/car2go-high-speed-crash-ubc/ The driver of the semi-truck was uninjured, while 29 year-old driver of the pickup was pronounced dead at the scene. His name has not been released pending notification of next-of-kin.Sgt. Paulmert explained that police have not ruled out speed, alcohol, or distracted driving in the crash, but he said that road conditions are not considered a factor. He explained that the highway was bare and dry in a trackset pattern, with compact snow in the area. Sgt. Paulmert added that the RCMP are continuing their investigation into the crash.Sunday’s MVI is now the fourth fatal crash on highways in the B.C. Peace since the start of the year, which is twice as many fatal crashes than there have been in the City of Vancouver over the same timeframe. Vancouver’s second fatal crash of 2018 occurred early Sunday morning, when a 21 year-old man died in a single-vehicle crash while driving a Mercedes-Benz Car-2-Go.So far this year, no one over 30 years old has been killed on roads in the B.C. Peace, and two of the four fatalities were passengers. On January 25th, a 22 year-old Chetwynd man was killed when the vehicle he was riding in crossed the centreline and was t-boned on the passenger side by an oncoming semi. Eight days later, Sgt. Paulmert said that a 22 year-old woman was killed in a crash near the former Silver Sands Resort south of Chetwynd, after the vehicle she was in lost control in poor road conditions and was t-boned by an oncoming pickup truck.The most recent driver to perish at the wheel was a 17 year-old boy from Dawson Creek who died after his truck flipped when it hit the guardrail of the Taylor Bridge on January 5th. Sgt. Paulmert said that the teen was not wearing a seatbelt at the time of the crash and that according to the preliminary investigation, insufficient tire tread may have also played a factor.Sgt. Paulmert concluded by reminding motorists to drive according to conditions, put aside any potential distractions, and to make sure their vehicles are mechanically sound.last_img read more

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