Did VAR get big calls right? Debate rages on after Champions League drama

first_imgFILE PHOTO: VAR at Champions LeagueParis, France | AFP | Neymar called the decision that led to Paris Saint-Germain being dumped out of the Champions League a “disgrace”, while elsewhere on Wednesday Roma were left raging — both clubs are out of Europe and both feel cheated by controversial VAR calls.“It’s a disgrace. They get four guys who don’t understand football to watch a slow-motion replay in front of the TV,” the injured Neymar wrote on Instagram after watching PSG’s shock elimination against Manchester United.PSG were wobbling and trailing 2-1 at the Parc des Princes when Slovenian referee Damir Skomina gave a penalty after reviewing the images when Presnel Kimpembe blocked an apparently wayward Diogo Dalot shot with his arm.Marcus Rashford duly scored the penalty that dumped PSG out on away goals. But should such a crucial decision have been given?“I am a big supporter of VAR and I stay a big supporter of VAR,” said PSG coach Thomas Tuchel, before admitting: “It was a big decision, a cruel decision.”– ‘The law is wrong’ –In England, amid euphoria about the manner in which a depleted United side had gone through, even former players of the Old Trafford club said the penalty should not have been given.“I don’t care what any referee tells me, that just isn’t handball,” ex-United defender Rio Ferdinand said on BT Sport.“I love it that it is handball but I don’t get it. The law is wrong.”On the same channel, Michael Owen, another ex-United player, said: “I know there’ll be people who will say it’s a penalty but for me it’s not one in a million years.”UEFA bowed to pressure by bringing forward the introduction of Video Assistant Referees into the Champions League from this season’s knockout rounds.Back in September, they had announced it would come in from next season, but it was widely a success at the World Cup and is now used in many domestic leagues, including the top flights in Spain, Italy, Germany and France.However, at the very least there remain teething problems when it comes to the interpretation of handball — only last weekend changes were announced to the law from next season, saying it will no longer have to be “deliberate”. – Roma denounce ‘robbery’ –In the meantime, there remained widespread disagreement over Wednesday’s crucial calls.“What we’re finding with VAR is every ex-footballer thinks something is not a penalty but every referee thinks it is. There’s a huge disconnect and that is the worrying thing,” added Owen.A year ago, Gianluigi Buffon was in goal for Juventus when they were knocked out by Real Madrid after a debatable, late penalty.The Italians demanded the introduction of VAR on the back of that, but Buffon, now at PSG, will wish it had not been in place as he was beaten by Rashford’s kick.Meanwhile, Roma were left with the same bitter taste as they went out in extra time to Porto, losing 3-1 on the night, and 4-3 on aggregate.The tie hinged on a decision by Turkish referee Cuneyt Cakir to point to the spot late in extra time upon reviewing an incident in which Alessandro Florenzi hauled back the Porto player Fernando.Alex Telles converted the spot-kick, and Roma were then denied a penalty at the other end following a review, after Patrik Schick tumbled to the ground.“Last year we asked for VAR in the Champions League because we got screwed in the semi-final and tonight, they’ve got VAR and we still get robbed,” raged Roma president James Pallotta.“Patrik Schick was clearly clipped in the box, VAR shows it, and nothing is given. I’m tired of this crap. I give up.”Back in Italy, newspaper headlines talked of “a disgrace”, and said Roma had been “robbed”. Contrast that with the view in Portugal, as Porto advanced to the quarter-finals.“Blessed be the VAR that detected a penalty that was barely visible on the field but was very real,” said sports daily A Bola.How can VAR possibly be a satisfactory solution when interpretations of the rule continue to vary so wildly?Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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Madoya wins June/July Player of the Month

first_img0Shares0000Zoo Kericho midfielder Michael Madoya was named the June/July SportPesa SJAK Player of the Month.NAIROBI, Kenya, Sep 26 – Zoo Kericho’s diminutive midfielder Michael Madoya on Tuesday bagged the SportPesa Sports Journalists Association of Kenya (SJAK) Player of the Month for the combined June/July.The award comes as a motivation boost for the club that was promoted to the top flight this season after the Kenyan Premier League body suspended them alongside Nakumatt FC pending hearing of Football Kenya Federation’s appeal on Justice Mativo’s ruling that the league should feature 16 teams. Madoya, fondly referred to as ‘Dogo’ found favor among the SJAK Football Commission who voted him June/July’s best ahead of team-mate Nicholas Kipkirui, Sofapaka’s Ezekiel Okare and John Mwita of Chemelil Sugar.Madoya bagged a 49 inch LG television set and Sh100, 000 for his heroics while the rest of squad shared Sh50, 000.The panelists resulted to combining the two months after having only one match played in June.His midfield mastery helped the top flight debutants grind six points from draws with Kariobangi Sharks, Mathare United, Kakamega Homeboyz and victory over Chemelil Sugar.Madoya garnered 27 votes followed by Okare who got 25 while Kipkirui and Mwita polled 14.Madoya and the entire Zoo fraternity expressed optimism following the crowning of Madoya. He is the local king of assists having helped create seven goals and boast of seven goals to his name and is the creative force in Zoo Kericho FC.“I have played for a very long time but this is the first award I’m getting. It comes at a time when things are not good for the club and I hope it’s the beginning of better tidings for Zoo.” the 26 year-old said.-Zoo to go to court-Michael MadoyaClub chairman Ken Ochieng is planning to stop the league through the court in a bid to get the issue resolved. Zoo had played 25 rounds up until the high court instructed the league to revert to sixteen teams.“It is not fair at all for the players who have worked hard to get the team promoted and through the premier league rounds. We don’t know where we are supposed to play because the high court didn’t say where we are going. Nonetheless, we will try to get redress so that we be allowed to finish our debut season.” Ochieng said.“We did not commit any mistakes and the federation and league body should address this issue so that the players don’t suffer.” he added.Zoo and Nakumatt were struck off the league on Monday when KPL issued updated standings without them.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Clerical changes and a retirement announced in Raphoe Diocese

first_imgBishop of Raphoe Alan McGuckian SJ, has announced several clerical appointments for the diocese this summer.The following changes will be made during the months of July and August:Rev Danny McBrearty, CC of Clar, will retire after 43 years service to the Diocese.  Rev Stephen Gorman CC (Catholic Curate) of Convoy and Drumkeen will become CC of Milford and Kerrykeel. Rev Liam Boyle, CC, Arranmore Island has been appointed to the role of Chaplain at Letterkenny Institute of Technology and Priest in Residence Convoy.The outgoing LYIT chaplain Rev John Boyce will take on the role of CC at Arranmore Island.It was also announced that Rev Luckasz Przewieslik, of the Society of Christ Fathers for Poles Living Abroad has been recalled by his Religious Order. Rev Pat Davis, SJ will become Assistant Priest pro-tem in Tamney.Bishop McGuckian has wished every blessing on those who have received new appointments.Clerical changes and a retirement announced in Raphoe Diocese was last modified: July 4th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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49ers mailbag: What to make of Garoppolo’s completion rate?

first_imgSANTA CLARA – After four straight days of applying sunscreen, rotating notepads and studying 49ers practices, it’s safe to break out the first mailbag of training camp (questions submitted via Twitter and Instagram):Is Jimmy G struggling as much as his completion percentage may indicate? (@DalmatianDiva)First, be happy his left knee looks healthy. He’s enduring a lot of reps after September’s ACL Armageddon. His 50.0 completion percentage (24 of 48) reflects more than rusty passes sailing …last_img read more

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Allan Donald: White Lightning

first_imgKnown affectionately as “White Lightning”, he was feared and respected by batsmen the world over, and was one of the main reasons why South Africa’s return to international cricket was so successful.Early in his career, he captured 12 for 139 against India in Port Elizabeth in December 1992 to help the Proteas to victory on a pitch that was not recognised as conducive to fast bowling. (Image: Wikimedia Commons)Brand South Africa ReporterThe first Protea to capture 300 test wickets, Allan Donald was for some time the most successful Test bowler in South African cricketing history, and ranks among the best in the history of the game.His sensational strike rate says it all: he picked up a est wicket in just under every 47 balls, or every eight overs he delivered. By the time he announced his retirement from the Test arena in early 2002, he had taken 330 wickets at an average of 22.25 runs per wicket.Donald captured five wickets in an innings on 20 occasions and took 10 or more on three occasions. Known affectionately as “White Lightning”, he was feared and respected by batsmen the world over, and was one of the main reasons why South Africa’s return to international cricket was so successful.Stunning debutSouth Africa’s return from isolation began with the country’s first official one-day international, against India in November 1991. Donald made a stunning debut before more than 90 000 Indians at Eden Gardens, claiming 5 for 29 in an exhibition of fast bowling that made the rest of the world sit up and take notice. His international test career began against the West Indies five months later.Early in his career, he captured 12 for 139 against India in Port Elizabeth in December 1992 to help the Proteas to victory on a pitch that was not recognised as conducive to fast bowling. He later tallied 11 wickets in a one-off test against Zimbabwe in October 1995, knocking over eight wickets in the Zimbabwean second innings as South Africa again claimed victory.Donald didn’t always enjoy the same success in limited overs cricket, and was sometimes left out of the South African one-day team. He was controversially dropped from the team at the quarterfinal stage of the 1996 World Cup. South Africa, who had easily beaten all opposition up to that point, were defeated by the West Indies and exited the competition.Greater ControlIn the latter part of his career, Donald chose to shorten his run up. While this cost him some speed, it gave him greater control, and the loss of pace did little to curb his effectiveness. In fact, if anything, it helped him become a better and more effective bowler. The change probably also prolonged his career.Besides appearing for South Africa, Donald was also an extremely successful performer on the English county circuit, spearheading Warwickshire’s bowling attack during a period in which they dominated the English game under former Protea coach, Bob Woolmer. In fact, Donald played more cricket for Warwickshire than for his South African province, Free State, and he is married to an English woman, Tina, from Birmingham.After missing the 2000 limited-overs Super Challenge Series against Australia, the tour of Sri Lanka, the Singapore Challenge and the ICC Knockout Tournament, and serving out his contract with Warwickshire, Donald once again set his sights on playing for his country. That was excellent news for South African cricket, especially in a year that had been a difficult one with the match-fixing scandal involving three Proteas, including former captain Hansie Cronje. Donald’s return once again sharpened the South African bowling attack, which in his absence had lacked a cutting edge.Last TestBut charging in and bowling consistently in excess of 140 kilometres an hour took its toll on Donald’s body, and he pulled up injured in his final Test, against the Australians at the Wanderers in February 2002.Donald missed the entire one-day series against Australia because of that injury and returned to the South African team in August only at the Morocco Cup tournament that also featured Pakistan and Sri Lanka. It was a triumphant return as, playing on wickets that offered little help to seamers, he finished at the top of the bowling averages in the competition, and also captured the second most wickets. His performances included a man of the match winning 4 for 43 against Pakistan in a crucial contest that South Africa won by just eight runs.Definitely back in favour after his performances in Morocco, Donald played in all three ODIs against Bangladesh in South Africa, and did a decent job as the Proteas crushed their opponents easily.In formIn the following series against Sri Lanka, a good one-day team, Donald performed superbly, capturing 10 wickets in the five-match series, second by just one wicket to Shaun Pollock. His average was a highly impressive 18.60.He also showed that although he might have lost some speed, he had certainly learnt many lessons along the path of his cricket career and could still remove the opposition’s top batsmen. In fact, eight of his 10 victims were specialist top-order batsmen. In the series-clinching victory in the fourth ODI in Kimberley Donald was exceptional, capturing 3 for 18 in his 10 overs.In South Africa’s final action before the World Cup Donald played in four of the five one-dayers against Pakistan. Again he enjoyed success against top-order batsmen and in two of his four outings he succeeded in stifling the Pakistani challenge with economic, wicket-taking spells.Unfortunately for “White Lightning” he struggled in the World Cup, failing to find his rhythm, something that was so pivotal to his success. He came in for severe criticism from the press and the much longed for winning swansong didn’t materialise as South Africa was eliminated without reaching the Super Six stage of the tournament.It was an ending unbefitting a great and passionate servant of South African cricket. It brought to an end the career of one of the greatest fast bowlers of his era, a man who could have achieved untold success had his international career not started at the relatively advanced age of 24.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Ep. 124 | Frost and the Fairfield County Fair

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Dale, Matt and Kolt in today on the Ohio Ag Net Podcast powered by AgriGold. Matt gives us an update on his thirty animals that his two kids exhibited at the Fairfield County Fair. In between his estimated 70 miles walked, Matt found time to catch up with Trish Preston of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The crew talks about the frost and what that means for the crops. We get an update from Dale who visits with Corey Cockerill of Wilmington College on their visit day. Matt and Dale catch up with two ladies from John Deere on the opportunities for ladies in Agriculture.last_img read more

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Just not cricket! Govt and BCCI draw flak for proposing India-Pakistan series in December. Opposition parties, even cricket legends slam the decision

first_imgThe BCCI’s initiative to host the Pakistan cricket team for a series on Indian soil after five years has caused a massive uproar in political circles, divided opinion in the cricket fraternity and pushed the government on the back-foot. Opposition parties, such as the BJP and the Shiv Sena, were quick to slam the decision to resume cricketing ties despite Islamabad’s inaction against the perpetrators of the 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks. Even the Mahrashtra unit of the Congress lashed out at the BCCI for being insensitive towards terror victims. Cricketers too were critical, with legendary batsman Sunil Gavaskar saying: “Being a Mumbaikar I feel what is the urgency when there is no co-operation from the other side.” Faced with severe criticism, the government quickly distanced itself from the BCCI’s announcement. Officials in the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) said that the cricket body was “yet to seek permission for the series”. The statement was in contract to senior BCCI functionary Rajiv Shukla’s indication that there was “no problem with the government”. Politicians questioned the need for cricket diplomacy at this juncture, especially since such attempts have failed miserably in the past. In 1987, Pakistani dictator Zia-ul-Haq visited Jaipur to watch a match featuring the two arch-rivals and promote peace between the country. But soon after, in 1989, there was outbreak of Islamabad-sponsored terrorism in the Kashmir valley. In 2005, Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf witnessed the Indo-Pak cricket match at New Delhi’s Ferozshah Kotla stadium. But a series of terror attacks in India again derailed the peace process. More recently, during the 2011 World Cup, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh invited the then Pak premier Yousuf Raza Gilani to watch the semi-final match between the two countries in Mohali. But this peace initiative failed too as Islamabad took no action against 26/11 perpetrators despite it’s promises. The BCCI on Monday announced that it had decided to invite Pakistan to play three one-dayers and two Twenty20 games in December this year.advertisementlast_img read more

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10 months agoMan Utd fullback Shaw: I’ll repay contract faith

first_imgMan Utd fullback Shaw: I’ll repay contract faithby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLuke Shaw is determined to repay Manchester United’s faith in signing him to a lucrative five-year contract. A strong start to the season earned the 23-year-old a brand new contract.After falling out with Jose Mourinho towards the end of his rein, Shaw wants to become a regular contributor under new manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer.”I signed a new contract and I want to be playing every game and trying to help the team as much as possible,” he said. “Hopefully I keep playing games and keep myself in the team.”I haven’t had many injuries recently so that’s good. I need to stay fit and keep helping the team and maybe win a cup this season.”We are not where we want to be and not where we should be, so we have a very important second half of the season. Our aim is to get back into the top four because United without Champions League isn’t good. That’s where we want to be and what we are fighting for.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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BCCI must solve issue Tendulkar tells Ombudsman

first_imgNew Delhi: The Supreme Court-appointed Committee of Administrators (CoA) calling Sachin Tendulkars alleged conflict of interest issue as one which falls under the “tractable” category has irked the maestro. Just like V.V.S. Laxman, Tendulkar too has written through his lawyer about how he wasn’t provided clarity on his position as member of the Cricket Advisory Committee (CAC) when he was already an icon for Mumbai Indians. “Without prejudice to the aforesaid, the Noticee submits that it is surprising that the BCCI, being the very authority responsible for the Noticee’s empanelment to the Cricket Advisory Committee (CAC), is presently taking a position that the Noticee is exposed to an alleged conflict of interest. Also Read – We will push hard for Kabaddi”s inclusion in 2024 Olympics: Rijiju “It is reiterated that the Noticee was declared as the Mumbai Indians’ ‘ICON’ post his retirement in 2013, which was much prior to his appointment to the CAC in 2015,” Tendulkar’s lawyer wrote in the letter to BCCI Ombudsman D.K. Jain, which was accessed by IANS. “The Noticee has time and again sought clarification from the BCCI on the scope of his role in the CAC – but has not received a response from BCCI till date. BCCI is aware that the CAC merely performs an advisory/recommendatory role — and therefore, the Noticee’s role as a Mumbai Indians Icon (which in fact has always been in the public domain) cannot, in any practical way, conflict with his involvement in the CAC,” the letter said. Also Read – Djokovic to debut against Shapovalov at Shanghai Masters It also mentioned how Tendulkar had recused himself when his son Arjun was a contender for a place in the India U-19 team. “It is critical to note that the Noticee had specifically written to the BCCI in respect of the potential conflict of interest that could have arisen in the aforesaid scenario,” the letter read. The former India skipper’s surprise at the whole turn of events was further visible when the letter mentioned how the BCCI, after appointing him in the CAC, was now saying that he was in a position of “tractable” conflict. “The Noticee fails to understand how the BCCI (after having appointed him to the CAC) can now maintain its current stand that he is in a position of “tractable” conflict of interest. The BCCI response does not clarify this variance in its stance and the Noticee requests the Hon’ble Ethics Officer to call upon BCCI officials Rahul Johri and Vinod Rai to clarify this position,” the letter read. Just like Laxman, Tendulkar’s letter too speaks about how his only effort has been to serve Indian cricket. “The Noticee has served the Indian cricket team for more than 2 decades and accepted empanelment with the CAC to help and contribute towards the growth of Indian cricket. It is unfortunate that the Noticee has to clarify the questions raised in the complaint and the BCCI response. The Noticee repeats that BCCI is responsible for the situation created in terms of the Noticee’s honorary empanelment to the CAC even though he was a Mumbai Indians Icon at the relevant time. The BCCI shall be called upon to clarify the issue,” the response said.last_img read more

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Texas AM Pulled Off A 1in3000 Comeback

When the dust cleared on those 35 seconds, the Aggies had scored six times — for 14 points — in the span of six possessions; they’d also forced four Northern Iowa turnovers in five possessions. They’d tied the game, forcing overtime, and would eventually win in double OT to complete the most bewildering comeback in the history of March Madness.In a certain sense, if each possession is a coin flip to score or not, the Aggies basically flipped heads 10 times in 11 tries — the likelihood of which is about 1 in 171.1That’s maybe even a little generous. According to data from Synergy Sports Tech, the Aggies scored on just 43.5 percent of their possessions this season. But even that vastly understates Texas A&M’s comeback probability, because some of its field goals needed to be 3-pointers, and the pressure exerted by the clock cannot be understated. Even as the Aggies had the ball, trailing by just 2 points with five seconds to play, Northern Iowa was still very likely to win because they only had to avoid giving up the tying bucket.In our database of 15,139 men’s college basketball games since the 2012-13 season,2That’s as much play-by-play data as we have access to in the ESPN database. nine games (including Sunday’s) saw a team come back to win from down 10 or more points with less than two minutes remaining. None of the other eight comebacks was executed in fewer than 62 seconds — nearly twice as much time as Texas A&M had to work with. And in terms of deficits overcome with exactly 35 seconds remaining, 12 points is by far the largest in our database; the previous high had been 8 points, when Canisius fought back against Louisiana-Monroe in December. In more than 570 tries apiece, no team had come back from down 9, 10, 11 or 12 points in 35 seconds over the past four years of Division I men’s basketball. And yet, in those final 35 seconds of regulation, as the turnovers started mounting for Northern Iowa and the points began adding up for Texas A&M, the tide began to turn: Fresh off a miraculous buzzer-beating win over Texas on Friday, the Northern Iowa men’s basketball team had pretty much capped off another upset over a Lone Star State school Sunday night when it led Texas A&M by 12 points with 35 seconds to play in the teams’ second-round NCAA matchup.Sure, the Aggies figured to play out the string hard, gambling for steals and committing fouls, but the game was essentially over — teams simply don’t come back from deficits so large with so little time remaining. In fact, you could have spotted the Panthers half that lead, and victory still would have been practically assured.That’s why our win probability chart considered the Panthers’ victory about as certain as it gets, well above 99.9 percent likely: It was enough to make other historic college basketball comebacks, such as Illinois over Arizona and Duke over Maryland, look downright pedestrian by comparison.In cases like this, it’s difficult to estimate the exact probability of a comeback, just because the model is verging on the realm of hypothetical possibilities instead of observed realities. (It also can’t account for specific, meaningful factors such as the Panthers’ top inbounder, Matt Bohannon, leaving the game with an injury right before his team’s meltdown began.) But based on all of the things our model does take into account, we assigned Texas A&M a 1-in-3,333 chance of winning when its deficit was 12 with 35 seconds left.In other words, you could play out Sunday night’s end-game scenario thousands more times and never once see the Aggies move on to the Sweet 16.For the sake of context, it’s important to remember that a few points are enough to make a very big difference, and that difference is much of what makes Sunday’s comeback so impressive. (For instance, Tracy McGrady’s 13 points in 33 seconds began with the Rockets down 8.) At the season level, the biggest collapses in baseball history have happened over glacial time scales compared with an NCAA Tournament game, and only one might be on the same level as Northern Iowa’s loss: when the 1995 California Angels missed the playoffs despite what FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver estimated to be 8,332-to-1 odds against it. Likewise, in his book “Mathletics,” statistician Wayne Winston estimated the odds against the Buffalo Bills beating the Houston Oilers when they trailed 35-3 with 28 minutes to play in their infamous 1993 playoff game and arrived at 1-in-3,825.Texas A&M’s performance Sunday has joined those games on the outer edge of the probability spectrum, and it’s difficult to imagine any comeback being much more improbable. Then again, in a crazy NCAA Tournament such as this, maybe the Aggies have simply given the next few rounds something to shoot for.Check out FiveThirtyEight’s 2016 March Madness Predictions. read more

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