Should I buy Tesco shares now?

first_img I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Should I buy Tesco shares now? Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks?If so, get this FREE no-strings report now.While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead.And the performance of this company really is stunning.In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends.We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen.Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31%In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!)Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick.What’s more, it deserves your attention today.So please don’t wait another moment. Image source: Getty Images. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. This stock could grow faster, though. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Harvey Jones has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Enter Your Email Address Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Tesco (LSE: TSCO) shares have had a solid pandemic, by and large. Not fantastic, or amazing, but solid. They trade at roughly the same level they did one year ago, just before the nightmare began. By comparison, the FTSE 100 as a whole is down around 14%.Shares in Tesco have also beaten the index measured over five years, and rather easily. Its stock is up more than 50% in that time, while the FTSE 100 grew just 12%. Past performance is no guide to future returns, but this is still impressive, given the troubles that affected the UK’s largest grocery chain before Dave Lewis took the helm in 2014.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Many investors now buy Tesco for dividend income, rather than share price growth. This happens when big blue-chips get to a certain size. Getting bigger gets harder. Previously, management tried to get round this by conquering the world, but that strategy came to grief in the US and Asia. So now it depends primarily on the hard-pressed British consumer for growth.Still the UK’s top grocerTesco and the other supermarkets deserve plaudits for feeding the country, keeping shelves stacked and deterring panic-buying. That doesn’t automatically make them good investments, though. So before deciding whether to buy Tesco shares, I’ll put that aside and look at the fundamentals.Tesco is still the UK’s largest supermarket, by a long chalk. It has market share of 27.3%, according to latest Kantar research, well ahead of second-placed Sainsbury’s at 15.3%. Better still, Aldi and Lidl’s breakneck growth has flattened over the last 18 months, although they remain a major threat to the dominance of the UK’s ‘big four’.New boss Ken Murphy has inherited a well-run company, in contrast to the chaos Dave Lewis had to sort out. The group had a good Christmas, with online sales up 80% year-on-year. The trend is set to continue and as a leader in the field, Tesco should capitalise on this. Lidl still does not do home delivery, although Aldi does.I’d buy Tesco shares todayTesco’s ‘finest’ range of premium own-brand products is also growing strongly, which suggests to me that that consumers are still willing (and able) to pay a little extra to treat themselves. One concern I have is that Tesco’s sales will fall once the lockdowns are finally over, as people buy more food and drink in pubs and restaurants, hitting its shares.Tesco shares are not exactly expensive today, trading at 12.5 times forward earnings. It also pays a rather good dividend of 4%, covered 1.9 times by earnings.Management plans to use proceeds from its recent disposals in Malaysia and Thailand to fund a £5bn special dividend. But operating margins are thin at 3.9%, and forecast to get even thinner, falling to 3.1%. Sadly I suspect there is little Tesco can do to improve them substantially, given tough competition in the grocery sector.The big long-term worry is whether Amazon will steam into food home deliveries and create havoc with established players. Investors have been fretting about this for years, and the big day has yet to come. I think Tesco has the size and scale to fight back, though, and would buy its shares for long-term income and with luck, a little share price growth too. Harvey Jones | Friday, 29th January, 2021 | More on: TSCO See all posts by Harvey Joneslast_img read more

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England tour: Is captaincy overrated?

first_imgDylan Hartley’s captaincy has been a fundamental part of England’s revival under Eddie Jones – what makes a good captain or is it all a load of hokum? Back in 2013 Wales battered England into submission, 30-3, in Cardiff ending the Grand Slam dreams of Stuart Lancaster’s team and claiming the Six Nations title for themselves. The result had far-reaching ramifications.It put the kibosh on the ambitions of several English players going on the British & Lions tour to Australia later that summer, including then-captain Chris Robshaw, and it sealed Sam Warburton’s appointment as skipper of that trip.Three years on and Lancaster’s replacement, Eddie Jones, has been talking up the chances of Dylan Hartley being made leader of the Lions when they head to New Zealand in 2017. He has done his cause no harm by leading England to a Slam and a series win in Australia eight months after it looked as if he could be out with the international washing after missing the World Cup.So is Hartley some kind of alchemist who has helped, with some major assistance from Jones, turn a bunch of flops into the second highest-ranked team in the world, has he just got lucky or is it a bit of both?Martin Johnson, England’s greatest on-field leader, always told us that captaincy was over-rated and the mystique attached to it was all media nonsense.The greatest: Martin Johnson is widely considered the greatest England captain of all timeHe said you had to have leaders all over the pitch and his side, that won the World Cup in 2003, was chock-a-block with them.He had Lawrence Dallaglio, Matt Dawson, Will Greenwood, Jonny Wilkinson, Phil Vickery, Neil Back and co around him to help out. But Johnson was King of the Jungle, even if he did not want to say it publicly.Hartley has a similar back-up team. He has three vice-captains in Mike Brown, Owen Farrell and Billy Vunipola, James Haskell and Robshaw have extensive captaincy experience, George Ford calls the shots from No 10 and George Kruis runs the line-out. But Hartley is still the boss on the pitch.As captain you have to be in touch with the lads but you cannot be one of the lads – there is a line. After the second Test win in Australia, Jones told us that Hartley had pulled up one of the squad for being late for a meeting, by two minutes. The boss loved that because he reckons that if standards slip, even little ones, then the whole operation can go awry. You can’t do that if you have staggered in at 5am with them the night before. Will Carling once recalled being given an earful by Rob Andrew for having one over the eight at a post-match dinner when he was a young England captain. Carling was 22 and an amateur at the time – but as Andrew reminded him, he was still England captain.Role model: Rob Andrew was said to have reminded Will Carling of his responsibilities as England captainOn the pitch in Melbourne, towards the end of the first half, when England were staging their rearguard action and a couple of players started putting their five pennyworth in with referee Craig Joubert. Hartley jumped on that one pretty quickly reminding them to put a sock in it because it could cost England a penalty. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Leading from the front: Dylan Hartley has been roundly praised for his leadership role center_img When Mike Brearley was recalled as England cricket captain in 1981 and started to turn the series that would become known as ‘Botham’s Ashes’ he receive a letter. In his book, The Art of Captaincy, Brearley recalls that it read: “Dear Brearley, There is an old Italian proverb; if you want to know that a fish is bad, look at its head…..” It looks like England have got their heads right, in more ways than one.Having a gifted team is handy though, there is no substitute for that. As Big Billy says: “He will always put the team first. If he thinks you aren’t pulling your weight he will tell you, and if you are doing a good job he will tell you. He is very inspirational, and a lot of boys follow him in that respect.”So communication is a big part of being a captain – talking to your team and to the referee. Warren Galtand said the thing that clinched the Lions captaincy for Warburton in 2013 was the way he managed the referee, Steve Walsh, in that game in Cardiff.Respect: Richie McCaw was trustred by all the players around him as skipperNext up is you have got to be worth your place. Hartley ticks the boxes on that score, like all the great captains from David Kirk to Richie McCaw, through Johnson, Paul O’Connell, Jean Pierre Rives and Willie John McBride. He is not quite on their level as a skipper yet, but he is getting there.Then you have to be a motivator – and this is where the Johnson theory gains some credence. If you need your captain to motivate you to play Test rugby then you really are in the wrong job.Johnson was not a tub-thumper, in fact as the players were in the tunnel ahead of the 2003 World Cup final he didn’t say a word. He just looked back at his team, knew they were ready to rumble and got on with it.The most important factor in captaincy is decision-making, especially when you are under the pump in a high-octane international. Johnson, McCaw and John Eales, the great Wallaby, and all the rest of the great captains had the knack of making the right call at the right time.Contender: Sam Warburton has a rival in Dylan Hartley as Lions captainEngland had an infamous leadership wobble against Wales during the World Cup but there have been no signs of that so far under Hartley’s – or his leadership team’s – watch.last_img read more

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Texas priest pays tribute to legendary church planter with 70-mile…

first_imgTexas priest pays tribute to legendary church planter with 70-mile prayer walk around Austin TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service By David PaulsenPosted Oct 30, 2020 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA The Rev. David Peters in front of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Austin, Texas. Courtesy photo[Episcopal News Service] On a mild but windy morning in Austin, Texas, the weather prompted no complaints from the Rev. David Peters, who was “ambling along” west of downtown. But gusts of up to 30 mph were making it difficult for the priest to describe his 70-mile prayer walk to the reporter who had reached him by phone.“Let me get to a little quieter spot here,” Peters told Episcopal News Service. He hung up, ducked into a Whole Foods supermarket and called back. Audio clarity was established. Taking a break from his travels, Peters explained why he is spending several days on foot honoring the Rev. Malcolm Riker, the legendary Diocese of Texas church planter.Riker, who died in 2002, is renowned locally for establishing eight new churches in the Austin area starting in the late 1950s. His admirers attribute that success partly to his seemingly boundless energy and stubborn determination. He also had a good sense for timing and location, Peters said, in an era when Austin was starting to boom.“The way Malcolm planted a lot of churches, he would get 20 people together from other churches that lived in a certain area, and then they would just buy land,” Peters said. “He had a pretty good sense for where the neighborhoods were about to be built.”Here’s Malcom the year before he moved to Austin to plant churches. #malcolmswalk pic.twitter.com/8wKf63v7NI— David W.(erewolf) Peters (@dvdpeters) October 29, 2020Peters’ admiration also derives from his own experience as a church planter. He leads the congregation of St. Joan of Arc, which meets at a wine and beer bar called the Three Legged Goat in Pflugerville, about 10 miles north of Austin. The coronavirus pandemic this year initially forced Peters to suspend in-person gatherings, but the congregation has since resumed Sunday worship services on the bar’s outdoor patio. Peters also leads daily worship services online through Zoom.On Oct. 29, he had just finished leading Morning Prayer from the road when ENS caught up with him. It was Day 2 of his prayer walk, and he was on his way from St. Mark’s to St. John’s Episcopal Church. Those church’s biblical names were no accident, Peters said. Riker’s church planting started with the Gospels.“Matthew, Mark, Luke and John,” he said. “Those were his first four churches.”Peters had another, more personal reason to set out this week on a long prayer walk. He is a long-distance runner who completed the 2020 Austin Marathon in February while wearing a floor-length cassock – “I’ll never do that again, probably,” he told ENS – and in May, he completed a marathon distance again by looping his house over and over. On Oct. 30, he turns 45, and for previous birthdays, his goal was to run as many miles as his age. The pandemic, however, has disrupted his training, so running 45 miles wasn’t realistic.Instead, he chose to walk to each of Riker’s eight churches, starting in the afternoon Oct. 28 at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church on Austin’s far south side. On the first day, he traced a route of about 10 miles to St. Christopher’s Episcopal Church. Then, he stopped and caught an Uber home for the night. “I’m not roughing it at all,” he said.Peters was up before sunrise the next morning to resume walking. He plans to complete the journey in segments, either on his birthday or on Oct. 31, with a final stop at St. Richard’s in Round Rock, north of Austin.Ending day 2 at St. John’s—founded in 1960. Each small volunteered to build an altar and communion rail. Malcolm ran all four gospel congregations at once for several years. He drove 104 miles every Sunday. #malcolmswalk pic.twitter.com/SibJbc03B9— David W.(erewolf) Peters (@dvdpeters) October 29, 2020Peters navigates the city’s sidewalks and paths while wearing his cassock. Clipped to the robe is a blinking light, for safety. He tops himself with a Roman hat, or a “saturno,” a circular-brimmed clergy hat. His pack doesn’t contain much more than some water and a battery charger for his phone, a necessity for this prolific Twitter user. “I’m doing a lot of posting, and GPS drains batteries real fast,” he said. For food, he stops at eateries along the way.Peters also is using the pilgrimage to call attention to the Diocese of Texas’ three newest church plants.Huge moon for the start of Day 2 of #MalcolmsWalk. I’m raising $ for church planting in central Texas—consider donating:https://t.co/yFGdkQomBehttps://t.co/[email protected] pic.twitter.com/fRBZ4Z7MaU— David W.(erewolf) Peters (@dvdpeters) October 29, 2020A new congregation doesn’t establish lasting roots overnight, he said. “I’m hoping this prayer walk pilgrimage will help me, and hopefully others, see that this is a long journey,” he said. “It was a long journey for Malcolm.” Riker spent years getting his churches off the ground, though in some ways, the church planter’s true role is that of the cheerleader, Peters said. To find success, “it’s real people showing up, sharing the vision and working hard, inviting people who don’t go to church.”Riker, an Austin native, was something of an “enigma” who approached the priesthood like a military commander, Peters said. During World War II, Riker enlisted in the Navy and saw combat in the South Pacific. As a priest, he was known as a traditionalist who opposed fundamentalism but also opposed women’s ordination, and he insisted on following Rite I in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer. “He was definitely a very stubborn and determined leader,” Peters said, and that personality sometimes turned people off. Even Riker’s family obituary alluded to his “egocentric” reputation.“It’s a similar problem to most startups. There’s the determination that people have to keep going. Hopefully in church planting, it’s fueled by the Holy Spirit. … But I think the Holy Spirit works with our personality to say, ‘I’m not going to quit,’” Peters said. At the same time, he doesn’t see Riker as the norm. “Most church planters are not big, bombastic figures. They just love people and love God.”The pandemic has been particularly challenging for priests like Peters who are growing new congregations that aren’t based at traditional worship spaces. “Most of my job was mingling, showing up, getting to know people,” he said. “That’s something that’s not impossible right now, but it sort of has to be rethought and redone. … God’s calling people, even in pandemics, to a life of community.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York People Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more

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Simon Collings to leave Resource Alliance for energy access charity

first_img Simon Collings, Chief Executive of the Resource Alliance, is to leave the organisation to take up a new position with the Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) International, a UK-based charity that seeks to reduce poverty through access to modern energy services.Collings joined the Resource Alliance in 2003 from Oxfam, where he had been director of fundraising.Collings said:“Working with the Resource Alliance has been like a vocation for me. I am incredibly proud of the strides we have made in the last few years.“The International Fundraising Congress is bigger and better than ever, and its sister event in the Global South, the International Workshop on Resource Mobilisation, is also going from strength to strength.“And, of course, I am immensely proud to have been instrumental is setting up the Fundraisers Fund”.Steve Thomas, co-chair of the Resource Alliance, said: Advertisement Tagged with: International Fundraising Congress Management Recruitment / people Resource Alliance Howard Lake | 22 January 2009 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  109 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis “Simon has provided exceptional leadership during his tenure as chief executive. He has given us a new vision and set us on the road to being the world’s leading advocate for civil society sustainability.“He will certainly be missed not just by the staff and trustees of the Resource Alliance but by everyone who he has had contact with over the past six years.”Collings, who blogs on UK Fundraising, will leave the Resource Alliance at the end of March. Simon Collings to leave Resource Alliance for energy access charity  110 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Stop attacks on Indigenous Peoples, Bangsamoro instigated by the US-Duterte Regime

first_imgMonica Moorehead, a juror at the tribunal, with Pya Macliing Malayao, a witness representing Mora and Indigenous Peoples.The following testimony was presented at the International Peoples’ Tribunal on economic, political and social crimes against the people of the Philippines.  The tribunal took place Sept. 18-19 in Brussels, Belgium. To read about the tribunal, go to tinyurl.com/y9jn8mxq/. I am Pya Macliing Malayao, a member of the council of leaders of SANDUGO, the Movement of the Moro and Indigenous Peoples for Self-Determination. I am also secretary general of Katribu Kalipunan ng Katutubong Mamamayan ng Pilipinas, or Katribu. Katribu is the national alliance of indigenous peoples’ organizations in the Philippines.  It was founded in 1987 in response to escalating violation of our collective rights to our ancestral lands and self-determination.I am an Igorot from the Bontok tribe in Mt. Province. Under the US-Duterte regime, I was a victim of attempted murder and illegal arrest during the violent dispersal of a protest action by Moro and indigenous peoples in front of the US Embassy in Manila demanding an independent foreign policy.Just to give a brief introduction on the Moro and indigenous peoples in the Philippines: The indigenous peoples comprise approximately 15 percent of the country’s total population.  They are composed of more than 100 major groups, a majority of which are in Mindanao, collectively called Lumad; the rest are in different parts of Luzon and the Visayas. The Moro people are 13 ethnolinguistic groups in the Philippines, most of whom embraced Islam and fiercely resisted Spanish and US colonialism. They comprise five percent of the Philippine population and are found mainly in Central Mindanao, Basilan, Sulu and Tawi-Tawi.The Moro and indigenous peoples face the distinct problem of national oppression, the systematic and institutionalized denial and violation of our right to self-determination — to freely pursue our social, economic and cultural development and determine our political status.National oppression instigated by the state and the ruling elite includes the historical denial of our territorial rights; misrepresentation and subversion of our socio-political systems; institutionalized discrimination; Christian chauvinism, and Islamophobia; commercialization of culture; social neglect or denial of basic services; and fascist attacks and militarization.We have been asserting our right to self-determination for decades by defending our territories and continuously developing our economic, political and cultural systems. We have launched legal mass struggles for self-determination and national democracy, as well as armed struggle.  We use our traditional defense systems and participate in the armed resistance for self-determination waged by the Communist Party of the Philippines, Moro Islamic Liberation Front, Moro National Liberation Front, Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Movement and even rising extremist groups.We have been criminalized and targeted for attacks because of our resistance and assertion of our collective rights against state policies that encroach and plunder our ancestral territories, counterinsurgency policies and the “war on terror.”Under the prevailing neoliberal economic policies, the territories of Moro and indigenous peoples are encroached by big foreign corporations, bureaucrats, local businesses, and the government itself. Among the ancestral territories targeted by the U.S.-Duterte regime are the Andap Valley; the mountain ranges of Pantaron, Daguma, Zambales, Sierra Madre, Cordillera, the Liguasan Marsh; and indeed the entire Bangsamoro homeland. This has led to further destruction of our sacred ancestral sites, poverty, displacement and loss of our ancestral territories.To ensure full control over these ancestral territories and their resources, President Rodrigo Duterte continued implementing the U.S. war on “terror” against the Bangsamoro and indigenous peoples. He expanded the counterinsurgency programs of past regimes through Operation Plan Kapayapaan, a program patterned after the U.S. Counterinsurgency Guide.Duterte, Trump work hand in handFollowing the dictates of the US imperialists, the Duterte regime has committed to support Operation Pacific Eagle Philippines, a U.S. counterinsurgency program that also targets the Bangsamoro. The Duterte regime further intensified its repression of the Moro and Lumad by its all-out war and martial law in Mindanao.The Duterte regime continued the National Internal Security Program Application on Indigenous Peoples and the Indigenous Peoples Centric Approach in its counterinsurgency program.  These focus in particular on the role of indigenous communities in neutralizing insurgency in the countryside.By “neutralizing” our communities, the Armed Forces of the Philippines hopes to cripple the expansion and mobility of the New People’s Army in remote areas. Duterte takes an interagency approach by actively involving government agencies in the counterinsurgency program in specific regions and on the national level, including agencies on the indigenous peoples, social welfare, education, justice and others. Duterte exploits traditional culture and defense systems to augment the state’s armed forces and its counterinsurgency operations.The communities and territories targeted for counterinsurgency and economic programs are severely affected by militarization. Among the strategies employed is the recruitment of indigenous peoples into paramilitary groups, especially in the Lumad communities in Mindanao.These paramilitary groups sow terror, divisiveness and disintegration of traditional socio-political structures in our communities. Other manifestations of the counterinsurgency program focused on indigenous peoples are the filing of trumped-up charges against indigenous community leaders; destruction of community livelihood and facilities; and forcible closure of Lumad community schools, which express our right to self-determination.Threats and harassment are made against teachers, parents and students. On Sept. 5, 2017, Obello Bay-ao, a Manobo youth leader and grade-7 student at the Salugpongan Lumad community school, was killed by paramilitary group members who were recruited, armed and trained by state forces.When we organized an action demanding an independent foreign policy in front of the U.S. Embassy in October 2016, the police dispersed our protest because they didn’t want to be embarrassed before US embassy officials.Just as a police mobile unit wantonly mowed down dozens of Moro and indigenous peoples during that brutal dispersal, the Duterte regime ruthlessly tramples on the rights of the Moro and indigenous peoples.Duterte’s all-out war, war on “terror” and imposition of martial law in Mindanao have resulted in massive violations of the Moro and indigenous peoples’ rights and international humanitarian law.Among the reported cases are 67 victims of extrajudicial killings, 27 bombing incidents affecting 353,988 individuals, 58 incidents of forced evacuation affecting 401,582 individuals, 140 incidents of attacks on Lumad community schools, forced closure of 70 Lumad schools affecting more than 2,600 students, and hundreds of victims of illegal arrest, detention and filing of trumped-up charges.The siege of the city of Marawi has resulted in the devastation of the principal center of the Moro people, causing their diaspora into other regions and loss of their cultural heritage. Other Moro communities are consistently militarized under the Duterte regime. From July 2016 up to the end of May 2018, at least 15,757 evacuees have been reported in the province of Maguindanao alone.U.S. imperialism under President Donald Trump actively supports the fascist Duterte regime by providing orientation, training, funds, arms and intelligence information to state forces.  It also provides direct military intervention under the cover of one-sided treaties with the Philippine government. The U.S. government has extensive economic and geopolitical interests in the territories of the Moro and indigenous peoples. These areas host U.S. military camps, multinational oil exploration in the Sulu Sea and Liguasan Marsh,and foreign energy projects, mining and agribusiness plantations.Trump said during his visit in November 2017 that the Philippines is “the most prime piece of real estate from the military standpoint.” On August 31, the U.S. reaffirmed its support for Duterte’s war on “terror,” martial law and Oplan Kapayapaan by saying that the “U.S. Special Operations Forces will continue to assist the Armed Forces of the Philippines in Mindanao through support that helps AFP commanders in their fight against militants.” US support is to “increase intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities” of the AFP. Over the past three years the Philippines has been the biggest recipient of U.S. military aid in the Indo-Pacific region.A recent 10-day series of airstrikes and indiscriminate bombings by the AFP in Maguindanao that was directed by U.S. Special Forces on the ground killed one civilian, severely wounded three and displaced over 7000 Moro people, including 400 children and 50 pregnant women.  On Sept. 14, seven Tausug Moro youth farmers were tortured and massacred by the military in Sulu. In addition, Trump’s Muslim Ban in the US subjected our co-chairperson, Jerome Succor Aba, to torture by US state forces in California.The displacement of Moro and indigenous communities — resulting from so-called development programs and fascist attacks against our struggles for collective rights to ancestral territories and self-determination — would ultimately lead to ethnocide, the death and extinction of our lives, culture and identity.The U.S.-Duterte regime is hell-bent on crushing any forms of resistance. Faced with these ethnocidal attacks, the Moro and indigenous peoples are even more determined to heighten our struggle for our collective and democratic rights. The crimes against the Moro and indigenous peoples must stop, and Duterte and the U.S. government must be made accountable.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Women’s basketball wins final home game of the season over OU

first_imgReddIt Sam Fristachi Sam Fristachihttps://www.tcu360.com/author/sam-fristachi/ Women’s Basketball falls in regular-season finale against Texas Linkedin Previous articleBasketball blows halftime lead to top-ranked KansasNext articleThe Skiff: March 5, 2020 Sam Fristachi RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Sam Fristachihttps://www.tcu360.com/author/sam-fristachi/ ReddIt Samantha Fristachi is a senior from Massapequa, New York. She is a journalism and sports broadcasting major and a business minor. She hopes to be a sports broadcaster on ESPN one day. Sam Fristachihttps://www.tcu360.com/author/sam-fristachi/ Women’s basketball falls in Big 12 Championship quarterfinals to Baylor Sam Fristachihttps://www.tcu360.com/author/sam-fristachi/ Women’s Basketball on three-game skid after loss to Oklahoma TCU women’s basketball’s senior class. Photo by Haeven Gibbons. Women’s Basketball falls to Kansas State in overtime loss Twitter Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Linkedin Facebook Facebook + posts printTCU women’s basketball’s senior class. Photo by Haeven Gibbons. TCU women’s basketball scored their highest point total of conference play Wednesday to defeat Oklahoma on senior night, 96-71.The six seniors accounted for 54 of the 96 points.“It was really important for us to come out and play well and play to our identity,” head coach Raegan Pebley said. “We took care of the boards, we did a good job on the defensive end and really shared the ball offensively.”Junior guard Lauren Heard scored the first eight points of the game as the Horned Frogs got out of the gates strong. Guard Lauren Heard scored 23 points on senior night. Photo by Haeven Gibbons. The teams then traded baskets, but Oklahoma would then go on its own 8-0 run to come within two.The Sooners pulled ahead of the Frogs to go into the second quarter with a two-point lead, 25-23.The Horned Frogs responded by going into the half with a seven-point lead, 42-35.Heard scored 17 of her 23 points in the first half. She also had four rebounds and three assists in the first half.TCU picked up right where they left off in the second half, opening the third quarter with another 8-0 scoring run to increase the lead to 52-37.The win marks TCU’s 21st of the season. Photo by Haeven Gibbons. The Horned Frogs went into the final quarter with a 26-point lead over the Sooners.TCU led by as many as 37 points with seven minutes to go in the game.With the win, TCU snaps a two-game losing streak and moves to 21-7 overall.The Horned Frogs will close out the regular season by traveling to Morgantown Sunday to take on West Virginia. TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Twitter TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hellolast_img read more

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Wiley Lott challenges students to ‘help folks’

first_img Book Nook to reopen Sponsored Content Email the author You Might Like SCALING BACK Teams prep for annual ‘Scale Back’ challenge Individual prizes may be the latest addition to Scale Back Alabama, but organizer… read more Wiley Lott challenges students to ‘help folks’ By Jaine Treadwell Skip Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration As the president of the College Republicans at Troy State University, Lott had the opportunity to work with Guy Hunt’s gubernatorial campaign and later to work with Governor Hunt in Montgomery as his assistant director of human affairs.Lott’s dream of attending the University of Alabama’s School of Law was not realized. So, he took advantage of the opportunity to attend the University of Arkansas. There he earned a degree in law, fell in love and married and went to work for a $50 billion and growing company, Wal-Mart.“All that time, I knew if I was ever lucky enough, I would get the opportunity to come back home,” Lott said. “I love Alabama and I love home.”When Wal-Mart was considering Lott as the one to lead the company’s real estate division, they asked if he knew anything about real estate. By The Penny Hoarder Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Published 10:45 pm Wednesday, January 15, 2014 “I’m just an ol’ country boy,” Lott told the students. “I grew up on a farm and we didn’t have a lot of money but we worked hard. I’d get up at 4:30 in the morning to feed the hogs, the chickens and the cows. When I wasn’t in school, I was in the field. The livestock always had to be fed at night before I ate.“Farm life was hard but I was laying the foundation for my life and career. I learned the value of hard work and the benefits of making good grades. And it paid off.”And, it didn’t hurt that Lott also had the benefit of being in the right place at the right. When all is said and done, it’s only people and place that really matter.That’s the message that Wiley Lott brought to the students of the Business and Finance Academy at Pike County High School Wednesday.Lott is director of external affairs and economic development for the Southeast Alabama Gas District. He is a Brundidge native whose family has been in Pike County for eight generations. “I said ‘I grew up farming. I know dirt,’” Lott said laughing.In that position, Lott had the opportunity to help the people in Pike County.Lott was responsible for finding locations for Wal-Mart Distribution Centers and his granny Sara Lott encouraged him to locate one of “those things” in Pike County. “Our people need jobs,” she said.The Wal-Mart DC became a reality, not just in Pike County, but also in Lott’s hometown Brundidge. The highway to the DC is named in memory of in granny, Sara Lott.In time, Lott said he realized that he was spending more time away from his wife and two children than with them.“I want to be there as my children were growing up,” he said. “It was time to go back home.”He came home to work with Alabama Power and now for the Southeast Alabama Gas District.“I’m right where I want to be,” he said.In closing, Lott challenged the students to strive for a PhD – which is achieved by being poor, hungry, driven.“Each one of us has a purpose and a talent,” he said. “Find your purpose. Use the talent God has given you and be passionate about it. Do what you love and always be prepared for opportunities.”Lott told the students that they should work for the long term, not the short term.“And always live beneath your means. Give the Lord 10 percent of what you earn. Save 10 percent and you’ll never be broke. Surround yourself with happy people. Be motivated by love and most of all, help folks.”He gave the students two rules for a happy and successful life.“Treat people the way you want to be treated — that’s the Golden Rule – and do what your say you’re going to do,” he said. “Life’s not perfect … but it’s good.” Print Article Latest Stories Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Patisserie Valerie buys Paul’s transport outlets

first_imgPatisserie Valerie has acquired seven sites based at London railway stations from rival retail bakery business Paul.The Birmingham-based BB75 retailer, part of Patisserie Holdings, revealed it had taken over the former Paul sites, previously operated on a franchise basis with contract caterers Elior, on 1 March.It includes locations such as Euston, Marylebone, Paddington, Waterloo and Victoria, in addition to two outlets in St Pancras.Paul May, chief executive of Patisserie Valerie, said: “The inclusion of these new takeaway stores in seven prime locations in London is a significant development for us as a company, as it will see thousands of visitors who are not familiar with the Patisserie Valerie brand now being introduced to the fantastic, freshly made products on display at our stores, on a daily basis.”Patisserie Valerie, owned by Risk Capital, said it had increased its estate by over 50% in the last two years, with more than 100 shops and the launch of its first site in Scotland during the last 12 months.May added: “The last 12 months has seen some significant achievements for us. Incredibly, despite being in a time of economic crisis, we have continued to bring investment and new jobs to the UK’s high streets, and reaching this milestone is a brilliant achievement.”Patisserie Valerie saw turnover rise by almost a quarter to £49.5m in the year to 30 September 2012.Read more about the move in British Baker’s 8 March issue of the magazine.last_img read more

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Capasso receives prestigious European Physical Society prize

first_img Read Full Story The European Physical Society (EPS) will award its most prestigious prize in quantum electronics and optics to Federico Capasso, Robert L. Wallace Professor of Applied Physics and Vinton Hayes Senior Research Fellow in Electrical Engineering at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.The prizes are awarded only once every two years, and recognize the very highest level of achievements in applied and fundamental research in optical physics. The awards will be presented in a special plenary ceremony on May 14, 2013, during the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) Europe, held during the World of Photonics Congress in Munich, Germany.Capasso joined Harvard University in 2003 after 27 years at Bell Labs where he was member of technical staff, department head and vice president for physical research.In announcing the 2013 Prize for Applied Aspects of Quantum Electronics and Optics, EPS cited Capasso’s “seminal contributions to the invention and demonstration of the quantum cascade laser.”His research has also focused on nanoscale science and technology encompassing a broad range of topics including band-structure engineering of semiconductor nanostructures and quantum devices, the investigation of attractive and repulsive Casimir forces, plasmonics, and flat optics based on metasurfaces.last_img read more

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Climate Change: The Absolute Truth Revealed (Video)

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York For decades, the climate change controversy has dominated scientific, political, religious and kindergarten class discussion, as those who believe that man-made activities have almost-irreparably affected global atmospheric conditions battle those who think that instead, it’s because Inspector Gadget has yet to topple Dr. Claw’s weather machine.Because let’s face it, those are the only two possibilities.Despite, like, science and stuff, there are those who still believe the Dr. Claw theory. Many of them, somehow were able to rise to a position of relative power in our country. Politicians for example.They will be very interested in this proposal to change the naming convention which has been in use by the World Meteorological Organization since the 1950s to name violent storms and extreme weather events.ClimateNameChange.org believes that this naming convention might be better suited to help pay homage to those who believe in the Dr. Claw theory.Oh, and the title of this post, “Climate Change: The Absolute Truth Revealed”? That was a lie. Ha! Gotcha. It’s the internet. I can say whatever I want to.But while you’re here, check out the proposed naming convention. And don’t worry, Dr. Clawians. He’ll get Gadget next time.Next time.last_img read more

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