Eurozone employment stagnates

first_img whatsapp Eurozone employment stagnates Wednesday 15 December 2010 8:30 pm Tags: NULL Show Comments ▼ Share Employment failed to grow across the Eurozone in the three months to September, it was revealed yesterday. The Eurostat office estimated no change in job rates across the single currency area, yet revised up rates for the second quarter of the year. Employment grew by 0.1 per cent in the three months to June, it said. For the third quarter, falls of 0.7 per cent were recorded in Greece and Spain. whatsapp Read This Next’A Quiet Place Part II’ Sets Pandemic Record in Debut WeekendFamily ProofHiking Gadgets: Amazon Deals Perfect For Your Next AdventureFamily ProofBack on the Rails for Summer New York to New Orleans, Savannah and MiamiFamily ProofIndian Spiced Vegetable Nuggets: Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofAmazon roars for MGM’s lion, paying $8.45 billion for studio behind JamesFamily ProofYoga for Beginners: 3 Different Types of Yoga You Should TryFamily ProofNew England Patriots’ Cam Newton says no extra motivation from Mac Jones’SportsnautChicken Bao: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily ProofCheese Crostini: Delicious Recipes Worth CookingFamily Proof KCS-content last_img read more

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Kindred repurchases 138,000 shares as buy-back programme continues

first_img Topics: Finance Kindred repurchases 138,000 shares as buy-back programme continues Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter 15th March 2021 | By Robert Fletcher Announced in February, the initiative will see the operator repurchase up to 2,000,000 of its own shares for as much as SEK190m (£16.0m/€18.7m/$22.3m). Share repurchases as part of the initiative are being made on Sweden’s Nasdaq Stockholm, with the operator permitted to spend up to SEK190m. Following the programme, Kindred said it intends to cancel the repurchased shares, subject to approval at its annual general meeting in May. Tags: Kindred Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Since the programme launched in 1 March, Kindred has repurchased a total of 842,000. Finance In its latest round of repurchasing, which ran from 8-12 March, Kindred bought back 138,000 shares fro SEK18.6m. Kindred Group has repurchased a further 138,000 shares as part of a buy-back programme that is due to run until the end of April. Regions: Sweden Email Addresslast_img read more

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National Bank of Kenya Limited (NBK.ke) 2013 Annual Report

first_imgNational Bank of Kenya Limited (NBK.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2013 annual report.For more information about National Bank of Kenya Limited (NBK.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the National Bank of Kenya Limited (NBK.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: National Bank of Kenya Limited (NBK.ke)  2013 annual report.Company ProfileNational Bank of Kenya (NBK) Limited is a financial services institution providing banking products and services for the retail, commercial corporate and Islamic banking sectors in Kenya. Its full-service offering ranges from transactional banking products to term deposits, personal loans and overdrafts, insurance premium finance, liquidity management, treasury services, custodial services and asset finance services. National Bank of Kenya offers mortgage products to salaried and business customers under the National Homes brand. The company also offers account relationship management and bancassurance products. It operates through a wide network of branches and ATMs in the major towns and cities of Kenya. Its head office is in Nairobi, Kenya. National Bank of Kenya Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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Lafarge Africa PLC (WAPCO.ng) HY2019 Interim Report

first_imgLafarge Africa PLC (WAPCO.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2019 interim results for the half year.For more information about Lafarge Africa PLC (WAPCO.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Lafarge Africa PLC (WAPCO.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Lafarge Africa PLC (WAPCO.ng)  2019 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileLafarge Africa Plc is a cement manufacturing company in Nigeria offering high quality concrete and aggregates for the home building and construction sectors. The company is one of the oldest cement manufacturing companies in Nigeria and is a member of the LafargeHolcim Group, the largest building and concrete solutions company in the world. It also diversified interests in manufacturing paint, repairing electric motors, transport services and Kraft bag production. Lafarge Africa Plc has plants in Ewekoro and Sagamu in the South West district; Mfamosing in the South-South district; and Ashaka in the North East district of Nigeria. The company has installed cement production capacity of 10.5MTPA and has plans to increase its production capacity. Its product range includes cement, aggregates, ready-mix concrete and pulverized fly ash. Cement solutions are marketed under the brand names Elephant, Ashaka, Supaset, PowerMax and Unicem. The company’s head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Lafarge Cement WAPCO Nigeria Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Keeping Samoan-qualified players for Samoa

first_imgQualification game: Nathan Hughes can play for Fiji, Samoa, New Zealand and after a few years, England There are a lot of intangible aspects to Richie McCaw’s greatness. He exudes an aura that compels teammates to dig deeper than they ever believed possible. You only need to look at the All Blacks’ last outing – an incredible heist from 19-0 down in Dublin – for that to hit home.The numbers are staggering too, and underpin the success of a 13-year international career that has a few furlongs to run. There have been 110 wins from 124 matches including just three losses from 49 clashes with Six Nations sides. One Webb Ellis trophy crowns a gleaming mountain of silverware. But dwell on this for a second: the magnificent openside has never faced Samoa.Getting stuck in: Richie McCaw in the thick of the actionOf course this is not his fault – an injured rib ruled him out of the last meeting, a one-off at New Plymouth in 2008 – but neither is it an innocent quirk of New Zealand’s fixture list. Since 1924 when the Western Samoan Rugby Football Union was formed, there have been just five full Tests between the countries.Others do not exactly possess a rich history of competition against Samoa. Boosted by World Cup fixtures, Scotland and Wales lead the way with nine encounters each. South Africa have had eight, England six with another to come at Twickenham in November.Before Richie Gray, Ross Rennie and co. won 17-16 at Apia in June 2012, the last ‘Tier One’ outfit to travel to Samoa was Ireland in 2003 – 11 long years ago. That is a sad state of affairs, forged out of an odd situation where burgeoning, brilliant talent has comfortably surpassed infrastructure.The recent words of Bundee Aki, the muscular Chiefs centre who will join Connacht after the current Super 15 campaign, spoke volumes for the predicament of Pacific Islanders.“Hopefully when the time is right and if I’m playing good footy, I can play for the Ireland international team,” he told Fairfax News in an interview that was probably too honest.“If I play three years over there and it doesn’t go well, I can always go back to Samoa.“They are a good international team as well but I’m just trying to look after my family and myself. It’s a long commitment. I put a lot of thought into it, looking at my options in terms of international rugby. Having signed for Wasps and Bristol respectively, Leuia and Lam will become household names in England before Christmas. But this is not merely about wanting to see these superb players more. It is about giving a passionate rugby country something to rally behind more regularly.Keep your eyes on future editions of Rugby World Magazine to read about our recent visit to Samoa to assess the state of rugby in the Pacific nation. Follow this link to subscribe. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img “Obviously the All Blacks have got their midfielders and with Sonny [Bill Williams] coming back, it’s a not a bad thing for me to go.”Winner: Bundee Aki in 2013Auckland-born Aki may feel little allegiance to the blue shirt, but his explicit ranking of Samoa behind Ireland and New Zealand in order of preference highlighted the allure of a move abroad in pursuit of financial stability and – when the ludicrously short three-year residency period is fulfilled – Test rugby for an adopted nation.Nathan Hughes, the exciting Wasps No. 8 and Aviva Premeirship flavour of the month, qualifies for both Fiji and Samoa. However, they are fall-backs. Having already served a residency period in New Zealand and given up hope of usurping Kieran Read, Liam Messam, Steven Luatua, he will now bide his time and see if England come knocking.Some difficulties are easing slowly, at least. Japan and Italy are visiting Samoa in June, with the Azzurri also heading to Suva for a Fijian showdown. At the 2015 World Cup, ‘Tier Two’ sides will not be subjected to the same crammed schedule as 2011 – an injustice an outspoken Eliota Fuimaono-Sapolu angrily likened to “slavery, the holocaust and apartheid” rolled into one.More meaningful matches would be fantastic though, and surely the best way to achieve that is for more established neighbours to step up. You have to believe Samoa and Fiji – even Tonga with time – would put up a decent fight in an expanded Rugby Championship. Granted, the southern hemisphere calendar is already saturated, but some re-jigging, maybe to reduce the format to one match each, would help. Failing that, how about an annual home-and-away fortnight of games against the All Blacks? Mouth-watering. Given their current crop, Samoa might get close to winning as well.All-action Samoan: Jack Lam for the HurricanesLeicester Tigers behemoth Logovi’i Mulipola is hugely dynamic and hard-hitting prop. Just ask Clermont’s stellar names. Tightheads James Johnston of Saracens and big brother Census at Toulouse can mix it with the most destructive scrummagers. Scrum-half Kahn Fotuali’i of Northampton is a class act. Hurricanes’ back Alapati Leuia is a prodigiously strong, elusive runner, while franchise teammate Jack Lam has proven himself as perhaps the planet’s form breakdown forward. For a population of around 188,000, to be consistently churning out such quality is simply amazing. TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

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Anatomy of a rugby transfer: The curious case of Johan Goosen

first_img New home: Montpellier’s full-back Johan Goosen attacks La Rochelle It has been labelled one of the sorriest transfer sagas in modern rugby history, but what have we learnt from Johan Goosen’s move to Montpellier? This feature first appeared in Rugby world magazine in October. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Unimpressed: Former Racing 92 talisman Yannick NyangaAdding a counter to Nyanga’s stated scepticism is Gerbrandt Grobler. He was also at Racing at the time and had a history of playing against Goosen during their high-school years in South Africa.“He is a good human being,” the now Gloucester lock says, providing a character reference. “Obviously his (retiring) was not the right decision,to breach contract, but I support him. He’s my friend. It’s tough because he is a great man and he only did what is best for his friends and family. Lifeis too short to be unhappy.“He wanted his freedom. He wanted his son to grow up on a farm. He wanted his space. He is a man who grew up on a farm, but we are not talking about a small place with a few goats and a sheep. It’s Africa, man!”Focusing on the rugby, does Grobler believe the deadly kicker will be a star at Montpellier? “Of course. He’s a great player who makes things happen. You are more confident with him in your team than playing against him.”For all of the drawn-out drama here, a few select sources within the game give a sense that this saga was a one-off.Rugby World understands that Goosen signed a lucrative contract extension with Racing between March and April 2016 that was worth a minimum of €500,000 a year, rising potentially to €600,000 with performance bonuses. Having then sought some outside counsel after his award win and playing in the 2016 Rugby Championship for South Africa, the player took the decision to ‘retire’.Related: Top 14 transfers for season 2018/19According to an informed source, who wishes to remain anonymous: “Goosen had a €1m ‘transfer fee’ written into his Racing agreement then, so if anybody wanted to sign him they had to pay Racing €1m. That became the sticking point.“Then there was all the stuff about him going to take off 18 months and going to the farm and retiring from rugby, which was just obviously bulls***. Montpellier eventually paid the transfer fee. It was around €1.5m in the end – that’s gross, which is close to €1m net.”As mentioned above, Goosen has hit back at any challenge that he did not yearn for a return to rural life by stating that he returned to South Africa and then headed over to Montpellier for “the sun, the space and the nature”.However much the move may sound to you like football dealings, though, there are big differences. Traditionally in rugby, players sign shorter-term contracts – of two to three years – so that they can play out the duration of the contract, move on to another team and start again. In football, longer contracts add value to transfer fees.As it stands in England at the moment, due to the current standard Premiership Rugby contracts, clubs cannot begin courting recruits before 1 January – the standard contract ends on 30 June. In France the rules are different and it is actually 12 months before the end of a contract when you can begin negotiating with another party.Big move: Gaël Fickou made a transfer to Stade FrancaisWhile an agreement of fees between clubs for a transfer before a contract runs its course does happen in the UK and Ireland, a lot comes down to club finances. There simply is not a lot of money flying around. While in France, there has been a quick rise in indemnity clauses in young players’ contracts due to the high demand for JIFF players (French-qualified youngsters of which clubs need a minimum number in their squads). So ‘transfer fees’ are included in a number of young French stars’ contracts. It is also known to happen in South Africa, which is player rich but where franchises are cash poor.We have seen big moves for star players in France before. It was reported that Louis Picamoles joined Montpellier from Northampton for around €1m. This summer, Gaël Fickou went from Toulouse to Stade Français for a reported €800,000 following club negotiations.Yoann Maestri also joined Stade but his situation was different. He’d signed a pre-contract agreement with La Rochelle and if any side pulls out of such a deal, the transgressor must front up ‘damages’ as specified in the Ligue Nationale de Rugby (LNR) contracts. The default fee is normally the yearly wage set forth in the contract, so it is likely Stade simply paid that fee to get Maestri.Changes are afoot in France. It was announced by LNR that the salary cap – which had been set at €10m – will be shifted upwards to €11.3m and fixed at that cap for the next three seasons.While two sources interviewed for this article have been preparing for a future in which big transfer fees like Goosen’s would also be included in a team’s final cap, this has not come to pass for the time being. Something that will be included in the cap is pay-off amounts for players being asked to leave a club.Transfer fees are clearly more common than many realise – ProD2 sides and those facing relegation will hope JIFF talent is still attractive to other teams – and Goosen’s case highlights issues in this area. Yet if you take all of this into account, have Goosen’s manoeuvres actually changed the business of rugby?As our source says: “If Goosen got away with this deal I think we’d see more (players retiring), but he didn’t. At the end of the day, Montpellier have had to pay a large sum of money.”center_img IN A REPEAT of last season’s Top 14 final, reigning champions Castres faced Montpellier in round one of this season’s competition. Again, Castres triumphed. Yet there was something different this time.At 15 for Montpellier was Johan Goosen. The South African, who can play ten, full-back and centre, shot back into the international consciousness in 2015-16. Having starred for Racing 92 that season, he was picked by the Springboks in August 2016 – earning his seventh cap and his first since November 2014. He would end up playing six more times for them before the year was out.In October that year, Goosen was also named as the best player of the Top 14’s 2015-16 season, beating Racing team-mate Dan Carter, and Toulon’s Fijian wing Josua Tuisova to the title.Yet these career-high moments are not what he has become famous for – or should that be infamous. It was his actions in mid-December 2016 when he announced he was retiring from rugby, and thus leaving Racing, aged just 24. He was quitting the game, it was announced, so he could become a commercial director at a saddle-horse stud farm back home in Bloemfontein.It was something of an open secret in France that Goosen wanted out of his freshly-signed deal, but few could have predicted he’d step away from the game of rugby entirely to escape it.At the time Racing’s president Jacky Lorenzetti publicly said: “We regret that so obviously talented a young player has been misguided and abandoned professional rugby.“Racing 92 reserves the right for a judicial follow-up to both Johan Goosen and those who advise him.”Try time: Goosen celebrates scoring for the Springboks in 2016How long did the exile from rugby last? By February 2018, French publications reported that a deal had been done between Racing and Montpellier, the latter club – owned by mega-wealthy Mohed Altrad – paying €1.5m (£1.3m) to secure Goosen’s services for the following season.In March 2018, he was in training kit, running around with the Cheetahs of Bloemfontein – where he had previously played 27 times in Super Rugby – with the franchise announcing that he would train with them until June.By April, Goosen played for them in a Guinness Pro14 fixture against Munster.In all, thanks to this fleeting retirement, there were 15 months between games for Goosen and more than 18 months between Top 14 fixtures.The dust may never truly settle on this transfer affair, but some are taking stock. In a recent interview with Midi Olympique in France, Goosen said of his ‘retirement’ move: “It was madness. I made a mistake. But that’s life. Paradoxically, I have also grown a lot over the past two years. I emptied my head and allowed my body time to recover…“I went through bad times. I was very sad. I thought all of this would never end. Sometimes I said to myself, ‘Maybe I should go back to Racing?’ And at other times, I was persuaded that going back wouldn’t do me any good. I was lost.“If a player is in my situation, I would say to him, ‘Do not do it, you will regret it. The price to pay is too heavy.’”Past colours: Goosen during his time with Racing 92Goosen went on to say that he yearned for wide, open spaces: “I am South African, I need space and, in the suburbs of Paris, the buildings are so close to each other that I felt like I was choking. I had the uncomfortable feeling of living in a box. The worst part is that my son was also very unhappy.“Because I was very unhappy off the pitch, I could not have stayed for five more years (at Racing)… Money has nothing to do with it. I wanted another life, the sun, the space and the nature. I’ll have all this in Montpellier.”Responding to the comments, recently retired Racing and France back-row Yannick Nyanga has his doubts about it.Nyanga tells Rugby World of Goosen’s stated reasons for leaving Paris: “I think it’s a farce. Nobody believed it. It was all quite ridiculous and retiring cost him a lot. One year (plus) without playing is huge – it’ll take time for him to get back on to his best level of playing.“At first we were all surprised when he left because we didn’t expect that. He had a big deal with Racing and he had only just finished his first year.“I perfectly understand anyone’s reasons for leaving because high-level sport is also a business. I’m a football fan too. I see players leaving clubs every season because they double their pay, the club get money from the transfers and then other players raise their pay. That’s the business.“But I don’t know if other players will use this (retiring like Goosen has) because it means not playing for a year. It will cost a lot, and at the end of the day I’m not sure that it is worth it.” This feature first appeared in Rugby world magazine in October.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter for the latest news in rugby.last_img read more

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Spanish charity says no to Big Brother money

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Spanish charity says no to Big Brother money Caritas, a charity in Zaragoza, Spain, has turned down around £3,000 offered by a Big Brother-type TV show. The charity states that it was not informed in advance and did not want to condone the programme’s “voyeurism.” Read Spain charity turns down Big Brother cash at cnn.com.UK charities were not so troubled. Childline, Centrepoint and Focus E5 shared the proceeds from last months’ auction of the set of the UK Big Brother TV series. “Nasty Nick” Bateman’s bed went for £2,000, and comic Alan Davies paid £30,000.01 for a chair.  11 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 4 October 2000 | News Advertisement read more

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The Law of FundRaising (Nonprofit Law, Finance & Management)

first_img  15 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Law of FundRaising (Nonprofit Law, Finance & Management) Howard Lake | 26 October 2007 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Guess2Give adds sweepstake to online events fundraising

first_img Tagged with: Digital Events Gaming Howard Lake | 9 June 2011 | News  45 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Guess2Give adds sweepstake to online events fundraising Guess2Give adds a new twist to online events fundraising by offering a sweepstake function to individuals’ sponsored events, giving people an opportunity to chip in, make a donation and stand a chance of winning a cash prize.Mark Chandler, co-founder of Guess2Give, said: “Anything that can be measured can become a fundraising event using Guess2Give. Whether it’s about guessing the length of a best-man’s speech, the weight of all the fish on a fishing weekend, how far a paper plane will fly or even the number of worms found in a square metre of earth. The possibilities are endless and we’re looking forward to seeing how inventive everyone can be”.It costs £3 to make a guess and participants are kept in touch via social networks and email. A fixed 50p from each guess goes into a prize fund and up to £2.51 (including Gift Aid) goes to the charity.“We see an opportunity to help charities engage with more people and provide an opportunity to make more activities have a fundraising capability” added Chandler.Parkinsons UK is the first charity to sign up and get their supporters involved. Fundraising Director, Paul Jackson-Clark said: “For me it was a simple decision to make when I was introduced to Guess2Give, as it will provide a new income stream without any cost or risk to the charity. It also brings a new, fun element for supporters to be more involved with an event”.Guess2Give, which is is licensed and regulated by The Gambling Commission, is currently one of three finalists for the London region who stand to win £50,000 of investment from Barclays.www.guess2give.com AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Journalist flees town following threat from coca growers

first_img RSF_en Latin America’s community radio – a key service but vulnerable December 4, 2019 Find out more News PeruAmericas Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders voiced concern today about the fate of journalist Miguel Carpio Tananta of Radio Marginal and the municipal TV station Frecuencia 5 in the northwestern city of Tocache who had to flee the city after receiving death threats on 5 April. Local coca leaf growers accused him of being a government agent after the prime minister screened one of his TV reports at a press conference.”We firmly condemn the threats that forced Miguel Carpio to stop working and we call for a thorough investigation and the punishment of those responsible,” the press freedom organization said.Reporters Without Borders added: “Bearing in mind the extreme tension in this region of drug trafficking, we appeal to the leaders of the coca growers to maintain calm within their movement and we urge them to distinguish between a journalist’s work and the use others make of it.”Carpio fled after a phone call warning him that he would be “the next to be murdered” and that the order for his execution came from the National Grouping of Coca Leaf Growers. He told the Instituto Prensa y Sociedad (IPYS), a Peruvian press freedom organization, that he feared reprisals against his wife and three children.The producer and presenter of the programme “El Informe” on Frecuencia 5, Carpio covered a public meeting of coca growers on 14 November at which they elected their local leaders. Four days later, the station broadcast the entire report.At a news conference on 27 February, Prime Minister Carlos Ferrero Costa screened a section of the report in which the deputy leader of the coca growers, Nancy Obregón, acknowledged that much of their coca crop ended up being used for cocaine production and trafficking. Ferrero told the press that he had received the video footage from the intelligence services.Outraged at being branded as drug traffickers, the coca growers accused Carpio of defaming them and of being an agent in the pay of the government. Carpio has all along insisted that he never distributed or sold any copies of the report. News to go further Organisation February 10, 2017 Find out more China’s diplomats must stop attacking media over coronavirus reporting April 13, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist flees town following threat from coca growers Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Peru April 1, 2020 Find out more Latin American media: under control of families, economic and political elites PeruAmericas News Reporters Without Borders is very worried about Miguel Carpio Tananta of the local TV station Frecuencia 5 in the northwestern city of Tocache who has had to flee the city after receiving death threats on 5 April. Coca leaf growers have accused him of being a government agent. Reporters Without Borders calls on them to calm down. Newslast_img read more

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